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Early Kings of Rome - Word Analysis. Max Fenton Isabel Martin. Cum his agunt reges, ut hi soli pro sua patria exercitue pugnent. “so that they alone might fight for their country and army” “pugnent” in the present subjuctive tense, because this is a purpose clause

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early kings of rome word analysis

Early Kings of Rome- Word Analysis

Max Fenton

Isabel Martin

cum his agunt reges ut hi soli pro sua patria exercitue pugnent
Cum his agunt reges, ut hi soli pro sua patria exercitue pugnent.
  • “so that they alone might fight for their country and army”
  • “pugnent” in the present subjuctive tense, because this is a purpose clause
  • “ut” introduces purpose clause and means “so that”
  • “sua” possessive adjective meaning “their” referring to an antecedent that is not in the sentence, “the brothers”.
  • “pro” preposition taking the ablative case. It’s objects are “patria” and “exercitu”. “que” means “and”
huic successit tullus hostilius
Huic successit Tullus Hostilius.
  • Translated as “this [one]”
  • Demonstrative pronoun
  • Dative Case
  • Singular
  • Referring to Numa Pompilius, who was succeeded by this Tullus Hostilius
  • Masculine
  • Object of verb “successit” which always takes the dative case.
duo romani vulneratis tribus albanis interfecti sunt
Duo Romani, vulneratis tribus Albanis, interfecti sunt.
  • “…after being wounded by the Alban tribe”
  • Ablative absolute, all in ablative case
  • “vulneratis” is the past perfect participle of vulnero, and in the ablative case.
tum respiciens videt eos magnis intervallis sequentes unus non multo abest
Tum respiciens videt eos magnis intervallis sequentes; unus non multo abest.
  • “…sees them following with great distance…”
  • Ablative of manner “magnis intervallis” which is “with great distance”
  • “sequentes” is a present participle formed from the infinitive translated as “following”
  • “eos” is the accusative, plural form of “is” which is “he” so is translated as “them”
cum horatius ad urbem accederet soror eum vidit gerentem paludamentum curiati quod ipsa confeceret
Cum Horatius ad urbem accederet,soror eum vidit gerentem paludamentum Curiati quod ipsa confeceret.
  • “When the Horiati came to the city…”
  • “accederet” in the imperfect subjunctive tense, shows this is a cum clause
  • “cum” translated as “when” in this cum clause
  • “urbem” takes the accusative after the preposition “ad”. Means “to the city”