act prep rules wks 8 17 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
ACT PREP Rules Wks 8-17 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
ACT PREP Rules Wks 8-17

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

ACT PREP Rules Wks 8-17 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 109 Views
  • Uploaded on

ACT PREP Rules Wks 8-17. Pronoun use. Nominative Pronoun use. These are the pronouns that are usually the subject of a sentence – and they do the action in that sentence. A few examples of these nominative pronouns acting as the subject of a sentence are as follows: 

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'ACT PREP Rules Wks 8-17' - kerri


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
nominative pronoun use
Nominative Pronoun use
  • These are the pronouns that are usually the subject of a sentence – and they do the action in that sentence. A few examples of these nominative pronouns acting as the subject of a sentence are as follows: 
  • I went to the store today.
  • She talked to her brother on the phone.
  • You ran five miles yesterday.
  • They are not very happy about what happened.
  • We work together as a team.
  • It is my favorite color.
pronoun use1
Pronoun use
  • NOTE: if you are confused about which pronoun to use in a compound subject, try each pronoun individually with the verb.
    • Examples: He will sing the National Anthem.
    • They will sing the National Anthem tonight.
    • He and they will sing tonight.
pronoun use2
Pronoun use
  • A predicate nominative is a noun or pronoun that follows a linking verb and renames or explains the subject of the sentence.
  • EXAMPLES: The woman on the phone was she. (She renames woman)
  • I was afraid it was she on the telephone.
  • I am looking for to Mr. Jeffers; are you he?
pronoun use3
Pronoun use
  • Objective case:Adirect object is a noun or pronoun that receives the action of the verb.
  • INCORRECT: Shannon paid Leland and I for the tickets.
  • BETTER: Shannon paid Leland and me for the tickets.
  • **It wouldn’t make sense to say Shannon paid I for the tickets, so it is incorrect to use I when paired with Leland.
indirect object
Indirect Object
  • Indirect objects tells to whom/ for whom.
  • Example: Raoul handed me the money.
  • The object of the preposition should be in the objective case. The OP is the noun/pronoun that ends a prepositional phrase.
  • Example: I wrote the letters (to my parents and her).
pronoun use4
Pronoun use
  • POSSESSIVE: Pronouns that show ownership
  • Example: The notebook is mine.
            • The jet ski is ours.
pronoun antecedent
Pronoun & antecedent
  • The word to which the pronoun refers is called its antecedent. In the following sentence, the noun book is the antecedent of the pronoun it.
  • Example: Janice handed the book to the librarian so that it could be replaced.
pronoun antecedent1
Pronoun & antecedent

A pronoun agrees with its antecedent in number and gender.

Examples: The boy is looking for his truck

All students will be getting their diplomas.

pronoun antecedent2
Pronoun & antecedent

Two or more antecedents joined by and are considered plural; two or more singular antecedents joined by or or nor are singular.

Examples: Juan and Julia will present their papers.

Neither Jon nor Ray left his phone.

If one is singular and one plural, the pronoun should agree with the closest antecedent.

Examples: Neither Mary nor her friends gave up their seat.

Will Kelly or Lee type his or her paper?

pronoun antecedent3
Pronoun & antecedent

Now your turn! Please complete the worksheet(s) over pronoun and antecedent agreement.

pronouns who and whom
Pronouns (Who and Whom)
  • To choose the correct form, you must identify the use of the pronoun in the clause. If it is the subject use who; if is is the direct object or object of a prep., use whom.
    • Examples: Mr. Tilley knows who hit the homerun. (Use who because it is the subject of the underlined clause.)
    • My older brother, to whom I sent the card, is 10. (Use whom because it is the object of the preposition to.
pronouns who and whom1
Pronouns (Who and Whom)
  • An easy way to determine if a pronoun is correct is to replace who with he and whom with him. If it sounds correct, you have chosen correctly.
  • Now your turn! Please complete the worksheet(s) over pronoun use.
comma usage i ii
Comma Usage I-II
  • Set off independent clauses in a compound sentence when they are joined by a coordinating conjunction.
    • (The planes were delayed by rain), but (they succeeded in safe takeoffs).
    • ***Do NOT use a comma to separate independent and subordinate clauses
      • I stayed up last night because I wanted to see the end of the scary movie. (no comma needed)
comma usage i ii1
Comma Usage I-II

****NOTE: Compound sentences may be punctuated with a comma and coordinating conjunction or semicolon.

comma usage i ii2
Comma Usage I-II

Set off words, phrases, and clauses that are not needed (nonessential). Use commas around nonessential, or contrasting information.

Examples:

Intense preparation, then, is known to produce high scores.

Robert Frost, a Pulitzer Prize winner, is an amazing poet.

Shakespeare, not Marlowe, is my favorite playwright.

comma usage i ii3
Comma Usage I-II

Now it’s your turn! Please complete the worksheet(s) over comma use.

comma usage iii iv
Comma Usage III-IV

Use a comma after an introductory phrase, clause, and adverb.

Examples: To be able to compete on the collegiate level, many high school athletes practice their sport all year.

If you are counting on a college scholarship, pay attention to your grades.

Occasionally, the person actually responsible for the vandalism will be caught and will pay the damages.

comma usage iii iv1
Comma Usage III-IV

Use a comma to separate items in a series.

Examples:

I selected my Shih Tzu because of her color, her attentiveness and her disposition.

Sue was infatuated with the tall, attractive stranger.

**Now it’s your turn! Please complete the worksheet(s) over comma use

semicolon use
Semicolon use
  • Use a semicolon to join independent clauses in a compound sentence without a coordinating conjunction. (Remember: a coordinating conjunction needs a comma.)
    • Examples: After winter break, John was happy to see Mary; Mary was not so happy to see John.
semicolon use1
Semicolon use
  • Use a semicolon to join two independent clauses joined with a conjunctive adverb.
    • Example: Seats in the front row are expensive; however, balcony seats usually cost much less.
semicolon use2
Semicolon use
  • Use a semicolon to join two independent clauses combined with a transitional expression.
  • Examples: Jill would be thrilled to shoot two over par on the front nine of the golf tournament; on the other hand, Tiger Woods would not.
semicolon use3
Semicolon use
  • Use a semicolon to join independent clauses or items in a series that contain commas.
  • Example: The nominees for Sportsman of the Year did not include John Daly, professional golfer; Dennis Rodman, ex-professional basketball player; or John McEnroe, retired professional tennis player
  • Now it’s your turn! Please complete the worksheet(s) over semicolon use.
colon use i ii
Colon use I-II
  • Use a colon to set off a summary sentence. A summary amplifies, restates, explains or emphasizes the meaning of the previous sentence.
  • Examples: His explanation for not having his homework was believable: He had had his car towed away with his schoolwork in the back seat.
colon use i ii1
Colon use I-II
  • Use a colon to introduce a list following a complete though (independent clause) or a formal or lengthy quote or appositive.
  • Examples: I have three reasons for being angry: my coach, my teacher and my parents.
  • He ended his patriotic speech by quoting JFK: “Ask not what your country can do for you…”
  • Now it’s your turn! Please complete the following worksheet(s) over colon use.
the dash and apostrophes
The dash and apostrophes
  • Use a dash or a pair of dashes to show an abrupt change of thought or dramatic effect or to set off an introductory list or series.
  • Examples: The dilapidated truck shook and rumbled its way slowly up the hill – it must have been at least thirty years old.
  • Suave, debonair, athletic, irreverent – Jose is all of these.
the dash and apostrophes1
The dash and apostrophes
  • Use an apostrophe to show possession and mark omissions in contradictions. (3 rules)
  • 1. Use apostrophe and s to singular and plural nouns that do not end in s.
  • Jill’s skirt
  • Hemingway’s novels
  • Women’s clothes
the dash and apostrophes2
The dash and apostrophes
  • 2. Add only an apostrophe to a plural noun that ends in s.
  • Kids’ trophies
  • Students’ homework
  • Teachers’ lounge
the dash and apostrophes3
The dash and apostrophes
  • 3. Make both nouns possessive to signal individual possession; make only the final noun possessive to show joint possession.
  • Butch’s and Ben’s coats were both dirty. (individual)
  • Luann and Mia’s project won. (joint possession)
the dash and apostrophes4
The dash and apostrophes
  • Contractions: Add an apostrophe to indicate letters omitted in contractions.
  • Don’t
  • They’ll
  • Should’ve
  • Now you try! Please complete the worksheet(s) over dash and apostrophe rules.
dangling misplaced modifiers
Dangling & Misplaced modifiers
  • Dangling modifiers are modifiers that either appear to modify the wrong word or modify a word that is not included in the sentence. Dangling modifiers can be phrases, clauses or single words.
  • Dangling: Walking down the street, the wind blew me over. (sounds like the wind is walking)
  • Correct: Walking down the street, I was blown over by the wind.
dangling misplaced modifiers1
Dangling & Misplaced modifiers
  • Dangling: Melinda heated up the bottle of milk as he cried loudly in the other room. (The phrase doesn’t modify anything in the sentence.)
  • Correct: Melinda heated up the bottle of milk for the baby as he cried loudly in the other room.
dangling misplaced modifiers2
Dangling & Misplaced modifiers
  • Misplaced modifiers are modifiers that have been placed incorrectly; therefore, they appear to modify words that they should not.
  • Misplaced: Josh only wanted a hamburger.
  • Correct: Josh wanted onlya hamburger.
  • Misplaced: The teacher returned the essays to the students marked with her comments.
  • Correct: The teacher returned the essays marked with her comments to the students.
dangling misplaced modifiers3
Dangling & Misplaced modifiers
  • Now it’s your turn! Please complete the worksheet(s) over dangling and misplaced modifiers.