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Considerations for the use of RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) Devices. Friedhelm Runge +49 221 89990 4084 Friedhelm.Runge@easa.europa.eu. Technical Principle. A „Tag“ contains information associated to object A „Reader“ collects information from object

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considerations for the use of rfid radio frequency identification devices

Considerations for the use of RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification) Devices

Friedhelm Runge

+49 221 89990 4084

Friedhelm.Runge@easa.europa.eu

29. May 2006

technical principle
Technical Principle
  • A „Tag“ contains information associated to object
  • A „Reader“ collects information from object
  • A application links object to further information

29. May 2006

different technologies
Different Technologies
  • Passive RFID:Energy is provided by interrogator trough demodulation of the received signal. No internal power source.
  • Battery Assisted Passive (BAP):Power from internal battery => grater distance possible; transmission only from reader
  • Active RFID: active transmission from the RFID device

29. May 2006

potential use
Potential Use
  • Aircraft parts marking
  • Freight, trolley identification
  • Baggage identification
  • Duty Free selling assistance
  • Access control
  • Security applications

29. May 2006

structure of the document
Structure of the Document
  • Certification related matters + technical details in EASA Memorandum attached as Annex to clearly identify and separate responsibilities.
  • Operational aspects in TGL 41.

29. May 2006

boundaries
Boundaries
  • Policy only for purely passive devices. All others not permitted unless part of a certified installation.

29. May 2006

easa position general
EASA Position General
  • System comply with telecommunication regulation (may differ in various countries)
  • Emission of Radio Frequency Energy within the limits of ED-14E , Section 21 Category M
  • Frequency used outside aviation frequency band
  • No fire hazard

29. May 2006

aircraft part marking outside any airworthiness approval
Aircraft Part Marking outside any airworthiness approval
  • Marking done only by experienced personal
  • Label not to change the component functionality
  • Label not to attract the attention of the cockpit crew
  • Label to be affixed under the applicable environmental conditions to avoid loose parts
  • Additional RFID labelling is not considered as change to an already approved part and does not invalidate the airworthiness approval.
  • Interrogation only on ground

29. May 2006

approved rfid systems
Approved RFID systems
  • RFID is not the only means for marking
  • A demonstration of the system functionality is required under all operational conditions
  • The Reader may not adversely affect the proper function of any other aircraft system.

29. May 2006

operational safety aspects general
Operational Safety Aspects (general)
  • Purely passive devices, not permanently affixed to the aircraft = switched-off devices => TGL 29 => no specific requirements, if passengers belonging
  • RFID Devices to be used by the operator must meet EASA principles. A written confirmation of the vendor is requested , that they are purely passive devices, contain no batteries, conform to appropriate EN standard.

29. May 2006

operational safety aspects for permanently affixed devices
Operational Safety Aspects for Permanently Affixed Devices
  • Meet additional EASA requirements
  • Not to attract attention of occupants
  • When used for parts identification, a failure of the RFID device will not require unscheduled component removal as all required marking is still available.

29. May 2006

operational safety aspects for reader operation
Operational Safety Aspectsfor Reader operation
  • Reader conform to EN standard and easily to be switched off.
  • If not certified as part of the aircraft operation, use guidelines for portable transmitting devices (TGL 29, DO-294A)
  • For installed readers see manual
  • Risk to erase data from magnetic data storage.

29. May 2006

operations manual
Operations Manual
  • Procedure for the affixing of devices
    • Where and how to place on aircraft parts
    • Identify instances of improperly affixed devices within the Quality System
  • Procedures for the use of readers
    • Where and when to be used
    • Deactivation and stowage

29. May 2006

training considerations
Training Considerations
  • Background of use
  • Affixing aspects
  • Interrogation aspects
  • Intended function
  • Use on-board aircraft
  • Use on board aircraft in flight safety aspects

29. May 2006