Lecture 7
Download
1 / 21

Lecture 7 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 152 Views
  • Uploaded on

Lecture 7. The Corporate Brand: An Organization’s Covenant. Objectives. An introduction to different branding types The characteristics of corporate brands Differences between corporate brands and product brands Differences between corporate brands and corporate identities

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Lecture 7' - keran


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Lecture 7

Lecture 7

The Corporate Brand: An Organization’s Covenant


Objectives
Objectives

  • An introduction to different branding types

  • The characteristics of corporate brands

  • Differences between corporate brands and product brands

  • Differences between corporate brands and corporate identities

  • Similarities between corporate brands and corporate identities

  • Corporate Branding Relationships (corporate branding architecture)

  • “Model of the Moment”: Adjusting the AC2ID TestTM so as to accommodate the corporate brand p.251


Understanding branding types i
Understanding Branding Types: i

  • Brands, in their various guises, have become a lingua franca

  • Traditionally, two types of branding have been identified:

  • ERSTWHILE BRANDS

  • ESTABLISHED BRANDS


Understanding branding types ii
Understanding Branding Types: ii

  • Erstwhile:in its simplest sense a brand is a name, logotype, or trademark. Often used as a mark of ownership.

  • Established:refers to the added values that a brand brings to a product. For the main, such values are synthetic in that they are superimposed on the product by marketing and communications managers and creatives


Understanding branding types iii
Understanding Branding Types: iii

  • However, there a new, and quite distinct, type of brand has emerged over recent years. This refers to those brands which refers to brands as applied to corporate entities. This branding category is called

    EMERGENT


Understanding branding types iv
Understanding Branding Types: iv

  • Emergent:equally applicable to countries, regions, cities etc it is most often applied to corporations and to their subsidiaries

  • Corporate brand values(unlike product brands) are not contrived but are bona fide.

  • The corporate branding philosophy, at itscore, represents an explicitCOVENANT between an organization and its key stakeholder groups, including customers


Corporate and product brands the differences i
Corporate and product brands: the differences: i

PRODUCT CORPORATE

MANAGEMENT middle manager CEO

RESPONSIBILITY middle manager all personnel

COGNATE marketing strategy/multi

DISCIPLINE discplinary

COMMUNICATIONS marketing total corporate

MIX communications corporations

FOCUS/FOCI mainly customer multiple internal and

external groups and

networks

VALUES mainly contrived those of founder(s)

+ mix of corporate

+ other sub cultures

Balmer (2001)


Corporate and product brands the differences ii
Corporate and product brands: the differences: ii

Of particular importance to the establishment, maintenance, and comprehension of corporate brands are company personnel and company culture(s).


Lecture 7

Corporate and product brands: the differences: iii

Moreover, corporate brands often boundary-span organizations.

Consider the Rolls Royce corporate brand. The Rolls Royce brand is, on the one hand linked to(a) an aero engines group, and (b) an automotive manufacturer. Two companies, sharing the same, quintisentially British corporate brand name: the latter is a subsidiary of the German automobile group BMW.


Corporate brands and corporate identities the differences i
Corporate brands and corporate identities: the differences: i

  • The identity concept is applicable to all entities in a way that the corporate branding concept is not.

  • A corporate brand will, almost certainly, have its origins in an identity.

    However, once a corporate brand has been established an organization’s identity elements need to be in alignment with the corporate brand covenant (the promise that is explicit in a corporate brand).


Corporate brands and corporate identities the differences ii
Corporate brands and corporate identities: the differences: ii

  • In addition corporate brands differ from identities in that they typically have a:

    Longer gestation

    External foci

    Higher profile

    Particular reliance on corporate communications, and strong verbal and visual identifiers

    Portability (can be bought, sold, and may be extended to other corporations, products, and services)

    Financial value that may be independent of the corporation itself.


Similarities between corporate brands and corporate identities
Similarities between corporate brands and corporate identities

  • The importance of:

  • Personnel and of sub cultural groups in their formation, maintenance, and comprehension.

  • Their multidisciplinary roots

  • The necessity for ongoing CEO/Senior Management support and sensitivity.


Corporate branding relationships i corporate branding architecture
Corporate Branding Relationships: i identities (corporate branding architecture)

  • Olins’s categorization of the three principal types of branding relationship remain influential.

  • Monolithic:the use of a single (corporate) brand name. This is used to identify the organization in addition to its’ products and/or services.

    Example: Shell

  • Endorsed:the use of a distinct brand name by a subsidiary (corporate brand) is accompanied by explicit reference to the the holding corporation’s brand (the same may occur for a product and/or service.)

    Example: General Motors.

  • Branded:the use of a distinct brand name by a subsidiary, product or service which makes no reference to the holding corporation’s brand.

    Example: Jaguar, a subsidiary of the Ford Group.


Corporate branding relationships ii
Corporate Branding Relationships: ii identities

  • It is important to note, however, that:

  • the aforementioned categories (monolithic, endorsed, and branded) primarily relates to the degree of profile they wish to give to their corporate brand/corporate brand. The focus is very much on the corporate brand/name as a VISUAL IDENTIFIER.

  • Most large corporations do not ascribe solely to one of the three branding categories.


Corporate branding relationships iii
Corporate Branding Relationships: iii identities

  • In recent years, it has become apparent that there are other types of corporate branding relationships. As such, behind a single corporate brand may lurk a variety of strategic arrangements. Thus, in addition, to monolithic, branded, and endorsed branding categories the following, additional, categories may be added:

  • FAMILIAL

  • SHARED

  • SURROGATE

  • MULTIPLEX

  • FEDERAL

  • SUPRA


Corporate branding relationships iv
Corporate Branding Relationships: iv identities

  • FAMILIAL: the adoption of the same corporate brand by two entities within the same industry. Example: HILTON

  • SHARED: as above, but with companies operating in distinct, markets.

  • Example: ROLLS ROYCE

  • SURROGATE: a franchise arrangement whereby one organization’s products/services are branded as those of another.

  • Example: British Regional Airways use of the BRITISH AIRWAYS brand


Corporate branding relationships v
Corporate Branding Relationships: v identities

  • MULTIPLEX: the muliple use, and sometimes multiple ownership/rights, of a corporate brand among a variety of entities in a variety of industries.

  • Example: VIRGIN

  • FEDERAL: the creation of a new corporate brand by separate companies that pool their resources in a joint venture.

  • Example: AIRBUS

  • SUPRA: a quasi, “arch” brand used to supra-endorse any number of corporate brands. Common in the airline sector (airline alliances)Examples: ONE WORLD/STAR/QUALIFIER


Model of the moment the ac 3 id test tm i
“Model of the Moment”: the AC identities3ID TestTM: i

  • Building on the AC2ID TestTM pp.15-30 a corporate brand can be viewed as an independent organism and, as such, may be viewed as a sixth identity type. This identity type we call the

  • COVENANTED IDENTITY.

  • (underpinning any corporate brand is an explicit covenant, or promise, that acts as a standard by which an organization or group organizations interact with key internal and external groups and networks.)


Model of the moment the ac 3 id test tm ii
“Model of the Moment”: the AC identities3ID Test TM: ii

  • See page 251

    The same principles relating the AC2ID TestTM can be applied to the AC3ID TestTM as shown on page 251 (including the REDS2 methodology for operating the model.

    Note that the covenanted identity is depicted as a five pointed star OUTSIDE the original pentagon. This reflects some of the abiding characteristics of corporate brands in that they can be applied to:

    other identities and entities

    shared with other organization

    have a life, reputation, and financial worth of their own.


Lecture 7

C identities3

THE AC3ID TESTTMSection V Exhibit One

AACTUAL

C3

C3

CCOMMUNICATED

C2CONCEIVED

C3 = Covenanted Identity

DDESIRED

IIDEAL

Balmer 2002 [28]

C3

C3


Decus et tutamen an ornament and a safeguard

Decus et tutamen identities“An ornament and a safeguard”

This Latin inscription is used as one of the inscriptions on the rim of British pound coins.

To us it epitomizes the worth of another currency: that of corporate branding.