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Mapping Census Infrastructure in Pacific Islands: Institutional and Capacity Building Issues. United Nations Expert Group Meeting on Contemporary Practices in Census Mapping and Use of Geographical Information Systems 29 May – 1 June 2007 United Nations, New York.

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mapping census infrastructure in pacific islands institutional and capacity building issues
Mapping Census Infrastructure in Pacific Islands: Institutional and Capacity Building Issues

United Nations Expert Group Meeting on

Contemporary Practices in Census Mapping and Use of Geographical Information Systems

29 May – 1 June 2007

United Nations, New York

Scott PontifexStatistics and Demography/Population ProgrammeSecretariat of the Pacific Community

slide2

Pacific Islands region

CNMI

Guam

Marshall Islands

Federated States of Micronesia

Palau

Papua New Guinea

Nauru

Kiribati

Tuvalu

SolomonIslands

Tokelau

CookIslands

Wallis etFutuna

Samoa

AmSamoa

Fiji

Vanuatu

French Polynesia

TEXT LAYER

Niue

New Caledonia

Tonga

MAP LAYER

PitcairnIslands

  • Three main sub-areas of Micronesia, Melanesia Polynesia.
  • 22 member countries (15) and. territories (7)
  • 9,1 million people over 34 million square kilometers of ocean
population and housing censuses 2010 round
Population and Housing Censuses, 2010 round

CNMI

Guam

Marshall Islands

Federated States of Micronesia

Palau

Papua New Guinea

Nauru

Kiribati

Tuvalu

SolomonIslands

Tokelau

CookIslands

Wallis etFutuna

Samoa

AmSamoa

Fiji

Vanuatu

French Polynesia

TEXT LAYER

Niue

New Caledonia

Tonga

MAP LAYER

PitcairnIslands

KiribatiPalau

Cook IslandsNiueSamoaTokelauTonga

Fiji

Marshall IslandsSolomon IslandsVanuatu

Am. SamoaCNMIFSMGuam

Kiribati

PalauPNG

Cook IslandsNiueSamoaTokelau

Nauru

Tuvalu

slide4

Context: 2000 round of census

  • Many Islands experienced difficulties financing their census operations in 2000 round.
  • Other resource constraints such as skill shortages and limited external technical assistance lead to short cuts being made which affected quality of coverage and census outputs.
  • Many countries (particularly small island states) had to start from scratch (in terms of trained personnel) and conduct the census with staff that had no previous census experience.
  • The main problem is retaining experienced and trained personnel after census the operation.
financial constraints
Financial constraints

Lack of funds

Census and census mapping is an expensive exercise.

Many island countries experienced some difficulties in financing their census operations during the last census (2000) round.

Technical assistance

Limited external technical assistance was available.

Priority in budget allocation

Another problem is that governments do not always give census a priority which results in PICs relying on donor support to adequately fund census activities

Budgetsfrom selectedPIC Censuses(2010 Round)

human resources
Human resources

Lack of skilled personel and loss of experienced staff

  • Several NSO are understaffed
  • Experience staff turnover
  • If there is continuous change of staff it impacts on the sustainability of census activities.

Where do staff go?

  • Other government agencies (associated with higher prestige)
  • Better pay or career advancement
  • Private sector
  • Overseas migration
  • Training overseas (study leave)
  • Voluntary redundancy due to political reform
human resources how do nso retain staff
Human resources –How do NSO retain staff?

1. Implement NSO staffing structure parity with that of other Government departments.

 E.g.- Government Statistician at same level (and pay) as Director of Planning Agency (otherwise people move)

2.    Set up career structure, which is conducive to people staying

This allows people to see a professional future in the organization

Greater need to recognize long-term benefits of developing new staff

Provide ongoing training and the possibility of study leave (to promote professional development)

3.   Give staff greater responsibility and meaningful tasks

Greater delegation of responsibility to younger staff is needed to provide them with variety of work and an environment to show their skills, take on challenges

slide9

Census mapping in the Pacific:

  • Pre census mapping is usually done late in the planning phase of the census cycle (often ad-hoc and too late).
  • Most censuses in the past were planned and collected without a clear GIS capability in mind and lack of geographic identifiers.
  • Traditionally census mapping is given low priority by most NSOs with several PICs lacking automated mapping systems
  • The most common use of GIS is the use of thematic maps to disseminate and communicate their census data (post census).
  • Collaboration with other government agencies has been challenging
no digital maps used in ea definition
No digital maps used in EA definition

Blacksands 835

Port Vila, Vanuatu

Blacksands (peri-Urban) Enumeration Area

In the 1999 Census this area was enumerated with

: 943 Households

: 4818 Population

slide12

(cont)

Port Vila, Vanuatu

Freshwota (peri-Urban) EA 840

In the 1999 Census this area had

: 492 Households

: 2715 Total Population

1999

2005

gis for data dissemination and utilization
GIS for data dissemination and utilization
  • There was a need to simplify population data, and to make these data more accessible at levels of geography below simply national levels.
  • The SPC developed a customized software (Population GIS) for statisticians and planners, to improve the effectiveness of census (and other socio-economic) data dissemination and utilization
  • So far 8 national systems have been developed covering the Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Samoa, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Cook Islands, Marshall Islands and Wallis et Futuna

Two distinct groups of intended users

  • The producers of data and statistics (NSO)
  • The main users of this data (Planning)
satellite imagery and gps case republic of the marshall islands
Satellite Imagery and GPSCase : Republic of the Marshall Islands
  • 2006 the Economic Policy, Planning and Statistics Office conducted socio-economic Community Survey on six Atolls to investigate basic living conditions and economic situation.
  • Used small hand held mobile Global Positioning System (GPS) units and high resolution satellite imagery
  • The team surveyed 1,205 households across 6 Atolls with data collected on 9,491 individuals (roughly 20% of the estimated population of the RMI.

Majuro Survey Team being trained in GPS

case republic of the marshall islands data collection
Case : Republic of the Marshall IslandsData Collection

Survey map provided to Ebeye

Survey Team

GPS coordinates, and selected

households

conclusion
Conclusion
  • Censuses and surveys need to be planned and collected with a clear GIS capability in mind.
  • Census mapping needs to be properly planned and resourced and given higher priority by Pacific Island NSOs and become an ongoing process.
  • While adoption of GIS in the Pacific has been sluggish. A growing local and regional capacity is being established in the region through the use of technology and long term training attachments
  • Wider collaboration within countries, innovative solutions and a coordinated regional approach is needed for sustainable utilization of GIS for census mapping in the Pacific Islands
slide21
Tank yu tumas Meataki ma’ata Malo aupito Ko raba Thank you Vinaka vakalevu Tangio tumas Sulang Faafetai tele lava Merci