The MOOCs Arrive: How Will Extensive Monetization Impact Open Educational Resources? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The MOOCs Arrive: How Will Extensive Monetization Impact Open Educational Resources?

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  1. The MOOCs Arrive: How Will Extensive Monetization Impact Open Educational Resources? Robert E. Cummings University of Mississippi, USA Online Educa 29 November 2012 Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  2. Q: Why is there a sudden wave of U.S. interest in OER and Online Education? A: University of Virginia. On 11 June 2012, UVA’s Board of Visitors removed its President. On 26 June 2012, after roughly two weeks of student and faculty demonstrations, the Governor of Virginia ordered the Board to reappoint the President. The squabble was triggered by MOOCs – Massive Open Online Courses. Image Source: Inside Higher Ed Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  3. “Building A Search Engine” Sebastian Thrun Former Stanford Research Professor. Currently Google Fellow. Developed Google’s self-driving car, Project Glass. Image Source: Charlie Rose David Evans Associate Professor of Computer Science University of Virginia Image Source: University of Virginia Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  4. Motivation was “Taking the University to the world,” and inspired by Khan academy. • Took a traditional class and put it online by flipping it: all content was placed on Youtube the form of short lectures, linked by quizzes. • 160,000 students enrolled beyond Stanford. • 170 of 200 traditional Stanford students stopped coming to class, citing the fact that videos were a “safer place to fail,” could be rewound, and were a more interactive way to learn. • Digital media experience is structured around the learner, who doesn’t advance without mastery (compare to “C” grade in traditional education). Thrun says he received thousands of e-mails from students who “feel good about themselves” compared to traditional higher education experience. • Communities of users spring up around courses to translate content, discuss, and tutor. • Graduated 23,000 at Stanford level quality. Midterm and final exams. • Cost students outside Stanford 1 -2% of enrolled students’ cost. Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  5. Unbundling of Multiple Elements • Learning theory: First OER were simply filming lectures and placing them online, c.f., placing an early film camera in front of a play. Now we see the application of self-directed web interface. • Credentialing: Earlier projects such as MIT Open Courseware, offered no credentials. Thrun broke that mold with his certificates. • Costs: The world wants higher education, but only a slight percentage can move to a traditional campus. • What is higher education? A chance to be mentored by a professor, wash your own laundry, make lifelong friends, and enter a new social club? Or a chance to learn skills for a better job? Image Source: http://liangsun.org Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  6. Characteristics of University Teaching(Adapted from Unlocking the Gates by Taylor Walsh) Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  7. Example Projects(Adapted from Unlocking the Gates by Taylor Walsh) Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  8. The Big Questions Michael Saylor, CEO of Microstrategy and author of The Mobile Wave: How Mobile Intelligence Will Change Everything, comments: “In the fourth wave of computing, the internet wave, about 5% of the economy was automated. In the fifth wave, we’ll see 50% of the economy de-materialize. Things like a video camera, a tape recorder, a magazine . . . they used to be products. Now they’re icons on a screen. An education used to be a service provided by people. Education is now de-materializing to become something off Wikipedia, or Kahn Academy, or off of Youtube. And as those products and services de-materialize, there is a corresponding rise in software application networks, most of them emanating out of the United States, in English, denominated in dollars, oftentimes reflecting American or Western values.” Image Source: Charlie Rose Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  9. The Big Questions Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  10. The Big Questions Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  11. The Big Questions But are those results replicable? Will it promote non-traditional learning over traditional Is the emergence of MOOCs the first example of Saylor’s 5th wave, or the complete “de-materialization” of education? Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  12. The Big Questions The current state of OER is similar to that of a community who has experienced a radical scientific breakthrough. One researcher -- Thrun , in our case -- has solved the OER to OEP problem with seemingly spectacular results. He has published these results. Now, we are in the position of trying to duplicate his experiment. And in so doing, we are learning what is replicable, and what is not. Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  13. What Questions do MOOCs Create for the Traditional OER Community? Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  14. What Questions do MOOCs Create for the Traditional OER Community? Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

  15. Works Cited Daniel, Sir John. “Making Sense of MOOCs: Musings in a Maze of Myth, Paradox, and Possibility.” Web. 1 Oct 2012. Saylor, Michael. Interview by Charlie Rose. Charlie Rose. PBS. 17 Oct. 2012. charlierose.com. Web. 18 Oct 2012. Sun, Liang. “My Certificates for CS101 And CS373 @ Udacity.” Next Spaceship: Computer, Technology, and Something Else.N.p. 24 April 2012. Web. 18 Oct. 2012. Thrun, Sebastian. Interview by Charlie Rose. Charlie Rose. 25 April 2012. charlierose.com. Web. 18 Oct 2012. Walsh, Taylor. Unlocking the Gates: How and Why Universities are Opening Up their Courses. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 2011. Weller, Keith. Alchemist. n.d. Wikimedia Commons. jpeg file. Preliminary Draft Publication 18 October 2012. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License