greek soup secular sacred divide n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
GREEK SOUP Secular-Sacred Divide PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
GREEK SOUP Secular-Sacred Divide

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 30

GREEK SOUP Secular-Sacred Divide - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 128 Views
  • Uploaded on

GREEK SOUP Secular-Sacred Divide. Dr. Gwen Dewey. Early Church Christians (33AD-325AD). They were Jews from Judea, who had retained their Hebrew worldview They were called Christians (Christ followers) and “The People of the Way” (who lived like Jesus taught and lived)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'GREEK SOUP Secular-Sacred Divide' - keiji


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
early church christians 33ad 325ad
Early Church Christians (33AD-325AD)
  • They were Jews from Judea, who had retained their Hebrew worldview
  • They were called Christians (Christ followers) and “The People of the Way” (who lived like Jesus taught and lived)
  • Their lives were highly integrated
    • Work, community, worship all flowed together
    • Church leaders had businesses (fishermen, farmers, carpenters, masons, ten makers, government workers, etc)
early church christians cont d
Early Church Christians (cont’d)
  • A minority group of Christian Jews were Greek-educated who had returned from Diaspora
  • Often there were violent confrontations between Judean Jews (retained their Hebrew worldview) and Diaspora Jews (adapted to the Greek worldview)
  • Stephan was a Diaspora Jew who was martyred by the Judean Jews
gentiles in early church increased in number and judean jews decreased
Gentiles in early church increased in number and Judean Jews decreased
  • Judea defeated by Rome in 70AD
    • temple destroyed
    • Many lives lost
  • By 130AD, all Jews had been violently eliminated from Judea
    • Unimaginable slaughter
    • Remaining Jews escaped to Egypt, Spain, other
  • Gentile portion of Church faired a little better, escaping the Judean slaughter
  • But, all Christians (Jew and Gentiles) suffered until Constantine in 325AD
major worldview difference within christianity
Major Worldview Difference Within Christianity
  • Eastern, where most people hold primarily to a metaphysical wholeness

(Old Testament and most of the New Testament)

  • Western, where most people hold primarily to a metaphysical dualism

(Can be seen In a few parts of the New Testament)

  • This worldview difference has caused us to be confused theologically
why did christianity change in the 3 rd century
Why did Christianity change in the 3rd Century?
  • Church became the official religion of Roman Empire (3rd Century)
    • Constantine became Emperor of Rome from 306-337; first Christian Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire
    • Creeds developed; emphasis on “life style” became secondary
  • Early Church Fathers were trained in Platonism prior to becoming Christians, and carried Greek philosophy over into Christian thought.
    • To make Christianity a respected & logical religion
    • To counter “learned” scholars attacks on Christianity
why did christianity change in the 3 rd century cont d
Why did Christianity change in the 3rd Century? (cont’d)
  • Through Platonism, work was compartmentalized into two parts
    • “Sacred” (the work of Church leaders and especially the monks)
    • “Secular” (mundane work of laity and peasants)
  • To be “spiritual” one needed to separate oneself from the material world as much as possible.
metaphysical dualism
Metaphysical Dualism

The perfect, eternal, unchanging non-

physical realm of ideas

Form

The imperfect, temporal, changing

physical realm

Matter

Assumptions that Affect our Lives, pg 111

metaphysical dualism applied to religion
Metaphysical dualism applied to religion

Sacred

Things pertaining to the spiritual, eternal, and unchanging upper realm of God in heaven

Secular

Things pertaining to the physical, temporal, and changing lower realm of humans on earth

Assumptions that Affect our Lives, pg 111

adverse impact of platonism on christianity
Adverse Impact of Platonism on Christianity

Worthy, everlasting work

Spiritual

Direct church-related work by missionaries, ministers, pastors, evangelists, etc.

Secular

Home, school, health services, business, marketplace, the trades, the arts, sports, government, labor, sex, money, etc.

Mundane, temporal & unworthy work

Assumptions that Affect our Lives, pg 111

this gap creates
This Gap Creates
  • Idea in the West that only the work of cardinals, bishops, priests, pastors, missionaries, etc. is “God’s work”

(Christianity in the east did not did not fully move into the Platonic thought)

did christianity ever correct this worldview
Did Christianity ever correct this worldview?
  • YES! Priesthood of the laity a major issue during the Reformation (1517-1540)
  • The Reformation affirmed the concept of work as worship and ordained by God
  • Martin Luther and the rest of the champions of the reformation believed that the laity were on a par with liturgists and preachers
  • People groups such as the Puritans were responsible for bringing on the Industrial Revolution

(Max Weber: Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism-1905)

greek thought came roaring back in the 18 th 19 th centuries
Greek thought came roaring back in the 18th & 19th Centuries
  • The Western “Enlightenment” movement (18th C) equated enlightenment to pure logic and reason (Greek thought)
    • Eastern enlightenment remained equated to revelation
    • Western educational systems completely embraced Greek thought
  • The Industrial Revolution (19th C) split the activities of family, work, church, government apart
    • Fathers left families to work
    • Churches were no longer integrated into work activities
greek thought came roaring back in the 18 th 19 th centuries continued
Greek thought came roaring back in the 18th & 19th Centuries (Continued)
  • Heavy emphasis on mission work by the Church
  • Materialism: Wide spread financial success led to loss of interest in the things of God.
  • Reduced role of the Church (education, health care, etc.)
biblical worldview of human activity
Biblical Worldview of Human Activity

Business

School

Art

Home Music

Sports

Church

law order

Human sexuality

Medicine

Banking

In harmony with God’s design (“good”)

In conflict with God’s design (“evil”)

Assumptions that affect our Lives, pg 112

nash mclennan study church on sunday work on monday 2001
NASH & McLENNAN STUDYCHURCH ON SUNDAY, WORK ON MONDAY (2001)
  • Institutional church ineffectively bridges between Sunday and Monday
  • Christians in business report less-than-satisfactory connections between their faith and work
nash mclennan study church on sunday work on monday 2001 cont d
NASH & McLENNAN STUDYCHURCH ON SUNDAY, WORK ON MONDAY (2001) cont’d
  • Problem appears at both ends:
    • Christians in business comments:
      • “The clergy are the last people to go to for guidance on business”
      • “We don’t speak the same language”
      • “They can’t manage themselves, how can they advise others”
    • Most clergy “felt” they had made no impact and had no mandate to do so
adverse impact of platonism on christianity1
Adverse Impact of Platonism on Christianity

Worthy, everlasting work

Spiritual

Direct church-related work by missionaries, ministers, pastors, evangelists, etc.

Secular

Home, school, health services, business, marketplace, the trades, the arts, sports, government, labor, sex, money, etc.

Mundane, temporal & unworthy work

Assumptions that Affect our Lives, pg 111

metaphysical dualism applied to religion1
Metaphysical dualism applied to religion

Sacred

Things pertaining to the spiritual, eternal, and unchanging upper realm of God in heaven

Secular

Things pertaining to the physical, temporal, and changing lower realm of humans on earth

Assumptions that Affect our Lives, pg 111

this gap creates1
This Gap Creates
  • Idea in the West that only the work of pastors or missionaries is “God’s work”
  • Christians have been sprinkled like salt in the workplace but are often ineffective

(Eastern Christianity did not fully move into the Platonic thought)

what went wrong
What Went Wrong?
  • Priesthood of the laity a major issue during the Reformation (1517-1540)
  • Reformation affirmed the concept of work as worship and ordained by God
  • Luther and the rest of the champions of the reformation believed that the laity were on a par with liturgists and preachers
  • People groups such as the Puritans were responsible for bringing on the Industrial Revolution

(Max Weber: Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism-1905)

what went wrong continued
What Went Wrong? (Continued)
  • Work as mission was lost in West, because:
    • Heavy emphasis on mission work - redemption
    • Government took over the role of social support – no need for church
    • Educational systems based on Platonic thought
    • Wide-spread financial success has led to loss of interest in the things of God