if we knew then what we know now adapting to meet challenges n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
If we knew then what we know now….Adapting to meet challenges PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
If we knew then what we know now….Adapting to meet challenges

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

If we knew then what we know now….Adapting to meet challenges - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 104 Views
  • Uploaded on

If we knew then what we know now….Adapting to meet challenges. Gulf Coast. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. A surrogate species approach, why is it something we need to do? Only a fraction of the landscape is devoted to species conservation (prioritize conservations lands)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'If we knew then what we know now….Adapting to meet challenges' - keely-holman


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A surrogate species approach, why is it something we need to do?

Only a fraction of the landscape is devoted to species conservation (prioritize conservations lands)

Finite resources are allocated to conservation as it competes with other socioeconomic objectives ($$ = best conservation value)

The vast majority of species habitat requirements remain unknown (utilize data rich areas)

Noon et al. 2009

slide3

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Dimension II

Dimension I

slide4

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

PARTNERSHIPS & COLLABORATION

slide5

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

USFWS strategic growth initiative for prioritizing sustainable habitat in the Gulf Coastal Prairies Conservation Region

slide6

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Key threats to multiple species

Human footprint

Sea-level rise

Intense drought

slide7

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A starting point:

Mottled Duck (irregularly flooded marsh)

Redhead Duck (estuaries)

Whooping cranes (saltwater marsh)

land use land cover change lulcc

Land use land cover change (LULCC)

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Present & Future

LC/LU

Past

LC/LU

Wetlands

Future (?)

Contemporary trends

slide9

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

NOAA C-CAP Landcover

Baseline?

Housing boom?

Energy development?

Mexico?

conservation planning

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Conservation Planning
  • Aransas NWR - Potential acquisition boundary
  • Where to expand and how much?
  • Need to understand the impact of sea level rise
slide12

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

What do cranes like now?

what does sea level rise mean for cranes

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

What does sea-level rise mean for cranes?

Initial conditions

2100 at 2m sea level rise scenario

slide14

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Potential habitat for whoopers with sea level rise

Initial conditions

2100 at 2m sea level rise scenario

slide15

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Coastal LiDAR to greatly enhance sea level predictions

Points in space = 3D vegetation and terrain

Work by Luke Beasley SCA intern

slide16

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Complementary data and tools needed for a surrogate species approach for:

  • Baseline information to determine habitats vulnerable to change, and areas less vulnerable
  • Prioritize areas for sustainableconservation
  • ID candidate sites for refuge expansion, mitigation banking, and other conservation approaches

Wetlands

Urbanization