NLS User Workshop Columbus, Ohio July 2007 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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NLS User Workshop Columbus, Ohio July 2007

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  1. Family and Parent Relationships in the NLSY97RT Michael and AR Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago NLS User Workshop Columbus, Ohio July 2007

  2. Scope of this topic/session • Family and parent relationships • Does not include key family relationships addressed elsewhere: marriage/cohabitation and fertility/children • Touches briefly on household composition • Focused on the NLSY97, brief discussion of contrasts with other NLS data sets, even briefer comparisons with non-NLS data sets NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  3. NLSY97 Family and Parent Relationship Data can support analyses of: • Family as the topic of interest • Family as a determinant or mediator of other outcomes • Family as an independent control variable when studying other topics NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  4. Who is a parent? What is a family? • NLSY97 has taken an inclusive and detailed approach to collecting family and parent data • Data are available about: • Parents: biological, adopted, step, foster, grandparents who are primary custodians, etc. • Family: people you live with, biological parents and siblings, half-siblings, step-siblings, step-parents NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  5. Exercise #1: Defining family • [See handout.] • Any NLSY97 project on family and parent relationships needs to grapple with what codes to use to define families and parents. • Looking at the 1999 household roster, determine which youth you would classify as living in two-parent households, one-parent households, or independently. Do all youths fit into one of these categories? NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  6. Types of Data about Families/Parents • Family composition • Dynamics of family composition • Family behaviors (co-residence, communication, migration) • Family relationships (quality, activities, subjective assessment) • Attitudes and expectations about families NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  7. Sources of Family/Parent data in the NLSY97 • Household Screener • Youth Interview • Household Information, Childhood Retrospective, Self-Administered Questionnaire • Schooling, Income, Assets, Health, Child Care • Parent Interview • Family Background, Calendar, SAQ, & “About Youth Info” • Created variables from Youth Interview • Siblings in the sample NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  8. Household Screener • Rostered: • All members of HH from which youth was selected • The following people if non-resident: • Biological parents of youth • Full and half-siblings of youth (living and deceased) • Anyone co-resident with the youth’s biological parents • Youth’s biological children, spouses • For all of these people, captured their relationship to youth, and basic demographic characteristics such as race, ethnicity, age, education, gender NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  9. Youth Interview • HHI, CHR, SAQ sections • SCH (college finance), INC (allowances and gifts), AST (inheritances and loans), CCA (childcare provided by Rs parents), HEA (major events: parent’s death or divorce), migration NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  10. Exercise #2: Using the Self-Administered data on parent-youth relationships • Compare data for different types of mothers (biological, adoptive, step, foster, other?) on the 1999 item ‘I think highly of [my mother figure].’ NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  11. YSAQ-002 R34825.00 ([age as of 12/31/96] <= 14); /* R's age on Dec 31, 1996 was less than or equal to 14 */ 1 CONDITION APPLIES (Go to YSAQ-003) Go To: YSAQ-055 YSAQ-013 R34832.00 ([R lives with mother] >= 1); /* R lives with mother or mother figure */ 1 CONDITION APPLIES (Go to YSAQ-017) Go To: YSAQ-034 YSAQ-017 Please tell us whether you strongly disagree, disagree, are neutral, agree, or strongly agree with the following statements about the person referred to below. ([mother or mother figure]) YSAQ-018 R34833.00 I think highly of her. 0 STRONGLY DISAGREE 3 AGREE 1 DISAGREE 4 STRONGLY AGREE 2 NEUTRAL OR MIXED NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  12. Parent Interview • Completed by a co-resident parent of the youth (preferred mothers); one parent could respond for multiple youths • Completed for 87% of youths in sample • Covers child’s early schooling and residence experience, and health • Covers responding parent’s background/employment history/marital history, background of child’s biological parents, expectations for child NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  13. Created Variables • Family process • Distances between parents and youth and prior addresses • Characteristics of youth’s biological mother and father (e.g., education, age at first marriage) NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  14. Siblings in the survey • Forty-five percent of NLSY97 youths (n=4035) have a sibling in the survey sample. Together, there are 2511 pairs of siblings in the data • Use variable ‘R1193000 SIDCODE 1997’ to identify siblings. NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  15. Exercise #2: Examining a single case • Tracing through the Parent Interview, the Childhood Retrospective, and any other relevant parts of the Youth Interviews, describe the youth's co-residence with parents and parent figures from age 0 to 14, and determine what 'mother figure' the R spent the most time with between the ages of 0 and 14. NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago

  16. Comparison with C/YA of NLSY79 • NLSY97 • Limited differentiating between co- and non-resident parents; also non-parent adults (e.g., mom’s partner) • Symmetrical (to mothers) information about youths’ fathers, especially non-coresident or estranged • Behavioral dimensions of youth-parent relationship (migration, co-residence,etc.) • Child/Young Adult of the NLSY • Extensive data on qualitative dimensions of youth-parent relationship • Unparalleled data on mothers (NLSY79 youth) • Prospective information on early childhood and pre-adolescence NLS User Workshop 2007 -- Michael and Datta, NORC at the University of Chicago