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American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Signed February 17, 2009. Opportunities for Federal R&D funding Frank Calzonetti Diane Miller Office of Research Development Jan Schoonmaker and Keith Morrison Van Scoyoc Associates. Overview of the Act. $792,000,000,000

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American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Signed February 17, 2009


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    1. American Recovery and Reinvestment ActSigned February 17, 2009 Opportunities for Federal R&D funding Frank Calzonetti Diane Miller Office of Research Development Jan Schoonmaker and Keith Morrison Van Scoyoc Associates

    2. Overview of the Act • $792,000,000,000 • To create 3.5 million jobs over two years • Includes: • Federal Elements • Helping Students and Families • Research Funding • Infrastructure • Job Training • State Fiscal Relief

    3. Federal R&D Funding • $21.5 billion total federal R&D funding • Conduct of R&D $18,000,000,000 • R&D facilities and capital equipment $3,506,000,000

    4. Distribution of Funds by Federal R&D Agencies • NIH: $10.4 billion • NSF: $3 billion • NASA: $1 billion • NIST: $600 million • DOD: $300 million • DOE $2 billion, + EERE $2.5 billion • NOAA $830 million • USGS $140 million

    5. Federal R&D Infrastructure • Academic research facilities: • NIH: $1.3 billion • Construction, repairs, alterations, shared instrumentation, capital equipment • NSF: $900 million • Facilities construction, major research equipment, academic research facilities modernization and the Major Research Instrumentation program • NIST: $180 million • competitive construction grant program for funding science research facilities

    6. National Institutes of Health (NIH) • National Institutes of Health: $10.4 billion (all available for two years) • Criteria for Spending (According to Acting Director Raynard Kington) • Short-term economic impact of funding (number of jobs created and preserved) • Long-term investment of funding

    7. NIH Funding Plans • $8.2 billion in support of scientific research priorities • $7.4 billion the Institutes and Centers and Common Fund (CF) to support cross-cutting, trans-NIH projects, based on a percentage-based formula • $800 million to the Office of the Director (OD) (not including CF)(For example, support for Challenge Grants), a program designed to focus on health and science problems where progress can be expected in two years. • To support additional scientific research-related activities that also align with the overall purposes of the Act • $1 billion to support Extramural Construction, Repairs, and Alterations • Allocated to the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) in support of all NIH funded research institutions • $300 million Shared Instrumentation and other capital equipment • Allocated to NCRR to support all NIH activities • So ~$9.5 billion to colleges and universities

    8. NIH Funding Mechanisms and Process • Choose among recently peer reviewed, highly meritorious R01 who are able to make progress with a 2-year grant • Fund new R01 applications that can make good progress with a 2-year grant • Provide targeted supplements to current grants • Jump start the new NIH Challenge Grant program with $100-$200 million to focus on health and science problems where progress expected in 2-years ($500K/yr for 2-years) • Other mechanisms and processes to be developed and used

    9. NIH: What you need to do • Monitor web sites for institutes in your interest, http://www.hhs.gov/recovery/ • Bring information from your contacts to Office of Research Development, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Provost Gold and Provost Haggett, or the Office of Government Relations • Watch for emails from the Office of Research Development for further opportunities • For those with existing NIH grants develop case for supplementary funding with deliverables within 2-years • Evaluate job creation impacts of existing and proposed projects • Prepare for Challenge Grant RFA • All projects will be peer reviewed

    10. National Science Foundation (NSF) • National Science Foundation (NSF) $3 billion • $2 billion for research grants • “research and related activities” • $900 million for infrastructure • facilities construction, major research equipment, academic research facilities modernization and the Major Research Instrumentation program • $100 million for education • ‘‘education and human resources’’

    11. NSF: Funding Mechanisms and Process • No supplements to existing grants proposed • 24,000 proposals on hand will be considered for support • “Dear Colleague” letter to be distributed soon • New solicitations expected for some programs • May consider proposals previously declined (after 10/1/08) but scientifically meritorious

    12. NSF: What you need to do • Monitor the NSF website and programs in your interest, http://www.nsf.gov/recovery • Watch for new solicitations • Bring information from your contacts to Office of Research Development, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Provost Gold and Provost Haggett, or the Office of Government Relations • Watch for emails from the Office of Research Development for further opportunities

    13. Department of Energy • $1.6 billion (Office of Science) • $400 million (ARPA-E) • $ 2.5 billion (EERE) • including: • $800 million for Biomass • $400 million for Geothermal • $50 million for IT and Communications • $300 million for an Alternative Fueled-Vehicles Pilot Grant Program • http://www.energy.gov/recovery/index.htm

    14. DOE: What you need to do • Monitor the DOE website and programs in your interest, http://www.eere.energy.gov/http://www1.eere.energy.gov/financing/ • Watch for new opportunities • Bring information from your contacts to Office of Research Development, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Provost Gold and Provost Haggett, or the Office of Government Relations • Watch for emails from the Office of Research Development for further opportunities

    15. NASA • $550 million • Science: $400,000,000 • to accelerate the development of the Tier 1 set of Earth Science climate research missions recommended by the National Academies • Aeronautics: $150,000,000 • to undertake systems-level research, development and demonstration activities related to aviation safety, environmental impact mitigation, the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) • http://www.nasa.gov/recovery/index.html

    16. NASA: What you need to do • Monitor the NASA website • Watch for new opportunities • Contact appropriate program managers • Bring information from your contacts to Office of Research Development, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Provost Gold and Provost Haggett, or the Office of Government Relations • Watch for emails from the Office of Research Development for further opportunities

    17. NIST • Construction of Research Facilities • $180,000,000 shall be for the competitive construction grant program for research science buildings, including fiscal year 2008 and 2009 competitions • UT submitted a proposal in summer 2008 for new Chemistry/Environmental Sciences Building

    18. Department of DefenseEnergy Efficiency Technology and ResearchOffices of the Assistant Secretaries for Research, Development and Acquisition • Research, development, test and evaluation projects, including pilot projects, demonstration projects and energy efficient manufacturing enhancements. • Funds are for • improvements in energy generation and efficiency • transmission, regulation, storage and for use on military installations and within operational forces, to include research and development of energy from • fuel cells • wind • solar • other renewable energy sources to include biofuels and bioenergy

    19. Department of Defense Funding Level: $300 million • Army: $75,000,000 • Navy: $75,000,000 • Air Force: $75,000,000 • Defense Wide: $75,000,000 http://www.defenselink.mil/recovery/

    20. DOD: What you need to do • Eligible Applicants: Contractors, government laboratories and facilities, universities and nonprofit organizations • http://www.arl.army.mil/www/default.cfm?Action=29&Page=29 • http://www.wpafb.af.mil/AFRL/afosr/ • http://www.onr.navy.mil/ • http://www.dod.mil/ddre/index.html • http://www.darpa.mil/ • Bring information from your contacts to Office of Research Development, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Provost Gold and Provost Haggett, or the Office of Government Relations • Watch for emails from the Office of Research Development for further opportunities

    21. State Portion • State Stabilization Fund: $53.6 billion • $48.3 billion (population formula) • $39.5 billion to education (K-12 and public colleges) • $8.8 billion to Governors • $87 billion for Medicaid • http://www.recovery.ohio.gov/

    22. State: What you needed to do • Persons interested in submitting a proposal shall follow the following steps: • Complete template and email it to one of six members of the UT senior leadership in order to obtain official authorization label in order for the project to advance: Dr. Lloyd Jacobs, President; Rosemary Haggett, Main Campus Provost; Dr. Jeffrey Gold, Health Science Campus Provost; Scott Scarborough, Senior Vice President Finance; Charles Lehnert, Vice President Facility; and Frank Calzonetti, Vice President Research.  Failure to obtain approval will threaten university support of the project at later stages. • Use “The University of Toledo authorizes….” as the beginning words of the narrative description. • Fill in all questions on the form as accurately as possible and submit the form to the State of Ohio. • Keep a copy of the submission and give an electronic AND hard copy to both the approving administrator and the Office of Government Relations (3510 University Hall, MS 926). • Keep the approving administrator and the Office of Government Relations informed of all correspondence from the State. • Consideration • This is a State form.  It is not a federal form. • The “job creation” category is very important and should be a realistic number. • Collaboration is encouraged.  However, a project with collaborators is only submitted by one of the partners.  If you are a partner but not submitting, inform your approving administrator and UT Government Relations of your participation. • Timing is critical. Please submit your abstracts to one of the six members --------------------------- of senior leadership by Wednesday, February 25, 2009.