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Elms Road Elementary School Mission Statement PowerPoint Presentation
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Elms Road Elementary School Mission Statement

Elms Road Elementary School Mission Statement

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Elms Road Elementary School Mission Statement

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  1. Achieving School Improvement with the Three R’s:Rigor, Relevance, and RelationshipsElms Road ElementarySwartz Creek Community Schools2010-2011

  2. Elms Road Elementary School Mission Statement • At Elms Road Elementary we will commit ourselves to learning and respecting others. Everyone will be responsible, safe and kind. • C ommit to Learning • R especting Others • E veryone Is Responsible • E veryone is Safe • K indness Counts

  3. Vision Statement The Elms Road Elementary Staff is dedicated to educating all children in a positive learning environment to achieve lifelong success. The educational staff will provide an atmosphere which fosters a love of learning while promoting children’s increased self-esteem, self-respect and mutual respect of others. While promoting a clean, safe, and healthy environment for all to enjoy, the employees will provide the tools for students to become productive, responsible citizens. • The educational team strives to address each student’s individual learning style through differentiated instruction and curriculum. • The staff promptly addresses concerns of students and parents. • The employees encourage and foster open communications between school and home.

  4. Educational Beliefs • Learning is our highest priority. • Each child has worth and is capable of learning at higher levels. • Family and community involvement is essential for student learning. • Diversity is considered a strength. • Education is a life-long process. • Teachers are committed to prepare students for success in the 21st century. • Each child has a right to a quality education.

  5. Demographics Swartz Creek City Population: 5,100 96 % Caucasian 1% African-American 3% Native American, Asian and other races Elms Road Elementary K-5 Building Population: 412 80% Caucasian 14% African-American 6% Native American, Asian, and other races 2% of Elms Road Elementary students are from non-English speaking homes 47% Free and Reduced Lunch rate 2008-2009 Targeted Title I School 2009-2010 Schoolwide Title I School 2010-2011 Schoolwide Title I School

  6. Enrollment Data

  7. Percent of Students Receiving Free or Reduced Lunch

  8. Differentiated Instruction Specialist Model • Work with students • Push in intervention groups • Ketchup room • Response to Intervention groups: 90:30:30 • Model instruction/provide coverage while staff observe peers • Resource gathering • Professional development for staff • Support for staff • Child studies • Data analysis • Research of best practices

  9. “If special education is the only significant intervention tool available in a school, it is inevitable that the school will come to rely upon that intervention too frequently.  A school with a multi-step system of interventions arms itself with a variety of tools for meeting the needs of its students and thus is more likely to find the appropriate strategy” - Taken fromWhatever it takes:How a professional learning community responds when kids don’t learn

  10. Special Education Evaluation Final Child Study After School and Before School Tutoring Child Study Response to Intervention 90:30:30 Ketchup Lunch Classroom Intervention Plan Response to Intervention Model- Criteria Fast Forward AM//PM Tutoring On-site Tutoring • 90 Minute ELA • 90 minute uninterrupted English Language Arts block all grade levels • 30 minute additional ELA intervention all students • 30 minute direct instruction intervention for all Special Education students-implementation Fall 2010 Tier Review Grades 1,2,3,4,5 Incomplete assignments • DRA/MLPP • Report Cards • Teacher Referral • DIBELS

  11. Expulsion Indefinite Suspension Zero Tolerance Suspension Quiet Lunch By Referral Only Behavior Plan- Parents, Teacher/Student Success Coordinator Child Study Team Parent Phone Calls (logged) Classroom Interventions Positive Behavior Support Pyramid

  12. Reading Goal • Elms Road Elementary students will increase their MEAP scores by 3% on the reading portion of the 2010-2011 MEAP test • 90:30:30 Response to Intervention Strategies • Data Analysis • Implementation of MEAP toolbox items

  13. Writing Goal • Elms Road Elementary students will increase their MEAP writing scores by 3% on the writing portion of the 2010-2011 MEAP test • Implementation of common writing process K-5 • Implementation of writing process specific to assisting males • Guided Study Groups • Modeling by Differentiated Instruction Specialist • Response to Intervention (RtI) • Implementation of MEAP toolbox items

  14. Math Goal • Elms Road Elementary students will increase their MEAP scores by 3% on the math portion of the MEAP test. • Response to Intervention (RtI) • Implementation of MEAP toolbox items • Implementation of concrete and virtual manipulatives focusing on problem solving

  15. 3rd Grade MEAP Data Analysis • 3rd Grade Data: Comparison of Data from 2005-2009 • Reading: Student achievement increased by 5% in reading. • Mathematics: Student achievement increased by 10% in mathematics.

  16. 4th Grade MEAP Data Analysis • 4th Grade Data: Comparison of Data from 2005-2009 • Reading: Student achievement increased by 3% in reading. • Mathematics: Student achievement increased by 6% in mathematics.

  17. 5th Grade MEAP Data Analysis • 5th Grade Data: Comparison of Data from 2005 to 2009 • Reading: Student achievement increased by 7% in reading. • Mathematics: Student achievement increased by 12% in mathematics.

  18. Keys to Creating Change Getting started: • Collaborative Culture • Degrees of Change • Emphasis on Learning • Essential Learning's • Assessments • Belief shift • ‘Must do’ list • WE WILL!

  19. *Supporting the Under Supported… • Identify needs • Define goals • Create intervention • Non-negotiables • Defining the system • Identify discussions • Identify roles • Develop timeline • Public relations • Response to Intervention • Positive Behavior Support * Taken from Gayle Karhanek 2007

  20. Standards-Based Report Cards • Implementation of Standards-based report cards in Kindergarten –Fifth grades • English Language Arts content area • Math content area

  21. What is a standards-based report card? • A standards-based report card sets expectations and communicates student progress toward meeting specific academic standards to parents and students.

  22. How does a student benefit from a standards-based report card? • Students and parents will have additional information on what students should know, do and understand to help them be successful in a rigorous academic program. • Standards-based report cards help ensure students have mastered specific content and provide information on areas of strengths and weaknesses allowing for acceleration and remediation opportunities.

  23. What performance indicators will be used onthis report card? • SCCS teachers decided to utilize a 4, 3, 2, 1 performance scale to communicate the level of mastery for each descriptor on the report card where a “3” indicates a student consistently meets a standard, a “2” indicates a students is progressing toward meeting a standard, and a “1” indicates the student is not meeting the standard.

  24. How does a teacher know when a student hasmet a standard ? • Criteria for determining performance are outlined in teacher developed rubrics for each descriptor on the report card. Teachers are in the process of developing multiple assessments for each element. A student has not met a standard until they have consistently provided evidence in a variety of assessments.

  25. Professional Development Ron Ritchhart: Project Zero, Harvard Intellectual Character Dr. Rod Rock and GeralynMyczkowiak: Cultures of Thinking Dr. Muhammad: Achieving School Improvement Through PLC’s Gayle Karhanek: How Professional Learning Communities Respond when Kids Don’t Learn Ruth Culham, 6 + 1 Writing Traits Gail Boushey & Joan Moser, The Daily 5 & Daily Café Otter Creek Math, Rocket Math

  26. Elms Road ElementarySchool Improvement Team • Cook, Sandy Differentiated Instructional Specialist • Deschaine, Mary Ann Principal • Harnden, Terrianne 1st grade Teacher • McGrady, Laura Building Secretary • Love, Jeremy 3rd grade Teacher • McCullough, Kay 4th grade Teacher • Stewart, Tracy Special Education Teacher • Schultz, Susan Speech Pathologist • Tylus, Valerie Title I Para-professional • Vanderlip, Michael Title I Coordinator • Vander Laan, Jennifer Kindergarten Teacher • West, Kevin 5th grade Teacher • Wood, Jamie Student Success Coordinator • Ray, Paul Parent • Smith, Lois Parent

  27. Bibliography • DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & Karhanek, G. (2004). Whatever it takes:How a professional learning community responds when kids don’t learn. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree (formerly National Educational Service • DuFour, R., DuFour, R., & Eaker, R (1998) Professional Learning Communities at Work: Best practices for enhancing student achievement. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree • DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & Many, T. (2006) Learning by Doing. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree (formerly National Educational Service • Eaker, R., DuFour, R., & DuFour, R. (2002). Getting started: Reculturing schoolsto become professional learning communities. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree (formerly National Educational Service). • Reeves, D. (2004) Accountability for Learning: How teachers and school leaders can take charge. Alexandria, VA: ASCD • Ritchhart, Ron (2002) Intellectual Character: What it is, Why it Matters, and How to Get it. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass • Marzano, Robert (2009) Getting Serious about School Reform Conference. Genesee Intermediate School District, Flint