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Engaging your Community to Eliminate the Opportunity Gap. Trise Moore, Federal Way Schools Theresa Jahangir, Education Northwest. ASCA Competencies.

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engaging your community to eliminate the opportunity gap

Engaging your Community to Eliminate the Opportunity Gap

Trise Moore, Federal Way Schools

Theresa Jahangir, Education Northwest

asca competencies
ASCA Competencies
  • I-A-6: Collaborations with stakeholders such as parents and guardians, teachers, administrators and community leaders to create learning environments that promote educational equity and success for every student
  • I-B-1e: Describes the benefits of a comprehensive school counseling program for all stakeholders, including students, parents, teachers, administrators, school boards, department of education, school counselors, counselor educators, community stakeholdersand business leaders
  • I-B-2: Serves as a leader in the school and community to promote and support student success
  • I-B-4: Collaborates with parents, teachers, administrators, community leaders and other stakeholders to promote and support student success
  • I-C-5: Effective school counseling is a collaborative process involving school counselors, students, parents, teachers, administrators, community leaders and other stakeholders
family and community engagement
Family and Community Engagement
  • What does it mean to you? What quote speaks to you? Which one represents your school of thought?
  • Gallery Walk (10 min)
  • Quote, Introduction, Discussion (10 min)
  • Group Share-Out (5 min)
family and community strengths
Family and Community Strengths

Identifying Surface Level

•Facts

•Assumptions

•Beliefs

•Norms

•Resources (in the community/family)

•Celebrations and Challenges

family and community strengths1
Family and Community Strengths

Discovering Deeper Level

•Strengths

•Assets

•Hopes

•Norms (spoken and unspoken from the perspective of staff and families)

•Resources (in the community/family)

•Celebrations and Challenges

what are your community s strengths
What are your community’s strengths?
  • Choose a postcard that represents your community’s strengths
  • Find someone in the room you don’t know
  • Explain why you chose the postcard, and how it represents your community’s strengths
reaching the critical parent
Reaching the Critical Parent

Identifying Surface Level

•Facts

•Assumptions

•Beliefs

•Norms (spoken and unspoken

from the perspective of staff and families)

•Resources (in the community/family)

•Celebrations and Challenges

reaching the critical parent1
Reaching the Critical Parent

Discovering Deeper Level

•Strengths

•Assets

•Hopes

•Norms (spoken and unspoken from the perspective of staff and families)

•Resources (in the community/family)

•Celebrations and Challenges

scenarios walking a mile in their shoes
Scenarios: Walking a Mile in their Shoes

Identifying Surface Level

•Facts

•Assumptions

•Beliefs

•Norms (spoken and unspoken

from the perspective of staff and families)

•Resources (in the community/family)

•Celebrations and Challenges

scenarios walking a mile in their shoes1
Scenarios: Walking a Mile in their Shoes

Identifying Surface Level

•Facts

•Assumptions

•Beliefs

•Norms (spoken and unspoken

from the perspective of staff and families)

•Resources (in the community/family)

•Celebrations and Challenges

plan for community engagement
Plan for Community Engagement
  • Small Groups/Individually
  • Discuss and write an Action Plan
  • Group Share-Out
  • Next Steps
resources
Resources

Definition of family engagement

Weiss, H., & Lopez, M. E. (2009). Redefining family engagement in education.FINE Newsletter, 1(2). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, Harvard Family Research Project. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/redefining-family-engagement-in-education

Family engagement enhances student achievement

Henderson, A.T., & Mapp, K.L. (2002). A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family, and community connections on student achievement [Annual synthesis]. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED536946

Kentucky Department of Education. (2007). The missing piece of the proficiency puzzle: Recommendations for involving families and communities in student achievement. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://education.ky.gov/CommOfEd/adv/Documents/PACtheMissingPiecev2.pdf

Family engagement protocols and rubrics

Connecticut State Department of Education, Turnaround Office. (n.d.). School improvement plan template and school audit tool. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/word_docs/rfp/csde_school_improvement_plan_template.doc

Kentucky Department of Education. (2007). The missing piece of the proficiency puzzle: Recommendations for involving families and communities in student achievement. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://education.ky.gov/CommOfEd/adv/Documents/PACtheMissingPiecev2.pdf

Spielberg, L. (2011). Successful family engagement in the classroom. What teachers need to know and be able to do to engage families in raising student achievement. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, Harvard Family Research Project. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED517975

resources1
Resources

Family engagement strategies for ethnically/racially diverse and low-income families

Boethel, M. (2003). Diversity: School, family & community connections [Annual synthesis]. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED483003

Henderson, A.T., & Mapp, K.L. (2002). A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family, and community connections on student achievement [Annual synthesis]. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED536946

Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund & National Education Association of the United States. (2010). Minority parent and community engagement: Best practices and policy recommendations for closing the gaps in student achievement. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://www.maldef.org/assets/pdf/mco_maldef%20report_final.pdf

Vanneman, A., Hamilton, L., Anderson, J. B., & Rahman, T. (2009). Achievement gaps: How Black and White students in public schools perform in mathematics and reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (Statistical Analysis Report, NCES 2009-455). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED505903

Family engagement strategies for the secondary years

Hill, N. E., Castellino, D. R., Lansford, J. E., Nowlin, P., Dodge, K. A., Bales, J. E. et al. (2004). Parent academic involvement as related to school behavior, achievement, and aspirations: Demographic variations across adolescence. Child Development, 75(4), 1491–1509. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ685626

Hill, N. E., & Chao, R. K. (Eds.). (2009). Families, schools, and the adolescent: Connecting research, policy, and practice. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Hill, N. E., & Tyson, D. F. (2009). Parental involvement in middle school: A meta-analytic assessment of the strategies that promote achievement. Developmental Psychology, 45(3), 740–763. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ838541

resources2
Resources

Needs assessments

Multnomah County, Countywide Working Group for Latino Success. (n.d.). Connecting families and schools: An assessment tool for educators working with culturally and linguistically diverse students. Portland, OR: Author. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from https://web.multco.us/sites/default/files/sun/documents/connectingfamilyandschool.pdf

National PTA, National Standards for Family-School Partnerships. (n.d.). The Power of Partnerships Family Survey. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from https://www.pta.org/files/Power_Of_Partnerships-survey.pdf

Organizing schools for improvement focusing on the aspects of the framework of essential support that relate to family engagement

Bryk, A. S., Sebring, P. B., Allensworth, E., Luppescu, S., & Easton, J. Q. (2010). Organizing schools for improvement: Lessons from Chicago. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED518995

Weiss, A., DeDeo, C.-A. (Eds.). (2008). Seven takeaways about the future of family involvement. Evaluation Exchange,14(1/2), p. 40. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED501338

Westmoreland, H., Rosenberg, H. M., Lopez, M. E., & Weiss, H. (2009). Seeing is believing: Promising practices for how school districts promote family engagement [Issue brief]. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, Harvard Family Research Project. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED505989

school counseling resources
School Counseling Resources
  • CESCAL: http://www.cescal.org/
  • ASCA: www.schoolcounselor.org
  • WSCA: http://www.wa-schoolcounselor.org/
  • Other sites:
    • www.advocacy.collegeboard.org
    • http://www.elementaryschoolcounseling.org/