the fuchsia brands initiative and the living countryside the impact on farm households n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Fuchsia Brands Initiative and the Living Countryside The Impact on Farm Households PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Fuchsia Brands Initiative and the Living Countryside The Impact on Farm Households

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 21

The Fuchsia Brands Initiative and the Living Countryside The Impact on Farm Households - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 138 Views
  • Uploaded on

The Fuchsia Brands Initiative and the Living Countryside The Impact on Farm Households. Dr. Deirdre O’ Connor and Siobhan Cahalane Dept. of Agribusiness, Extension and Rural Development Faculty of Agriculture, UCD . Study Context. Ongoing change in agricultural and rural policy in Europe

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'The Fuchsia Brands Initiative and the Living Countryside The Impact on Farm Households' - kathie


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
the fuchsia brands initiative and the living countryside the impact on farm households

The Fuchsia Brands Initiative and the Living Countryside The Impact on Farm Households

Dr. Deirdre O’ Connor and Siobhan Cahalane

Dept. of Agribusiness, Extension and Rural Development

Faculty of Agriculture, UCD

study context
Study Context
  • Ongoing change in agricultural and rural policy in Europe
  • Increasing recognition of more diverse model of rural economies compared to productivist agricultural model
  • Production of food and fibre just one among other activities to contribute to rural areas
  • Need to deliver high quality and varied foodstuffs, green services and amenities
study context1
Study Context
  • Changing societal and consumer demands also profound impact on context in which agricultural and rural policy operates
  • Farm households response to this changing context has been to embark on a range of development paths
  • i.e. engaging in a range of “broadening, deepening and regrounding” activities at farm level
study context2
Study Context
  • Regrounding – reconfiguring the way in which on-farm resources are used, changing farming systems, pluri-activity
  • Broadening – Farm enterprise becomes involved in markets for non-food products and services; non-agricultural activities realised within the farm; agritourism, sports, energy production
  • Deepening – reposition the farm within the agri-food supply chain – organic farming; regional quality food products; on-farm processing; direct sales
purpose of study
Purpose of Study
  • To determine nature and extent of broadening/deepening activities within farm households in WCLC/Fuchsia Brands initiatives
  • To ascertain role of WCLC/Fuchsia Brands in development of these activities
  • To assess members’ views re involvement with WCLC/Fuchsia Brands
study methodolgy
Study Methodolgy
  • Interviews with WCLC staff and Brand Members
  • Telephone Questionnaire
  • 96% response rate from survey!!
  • Key involvement of WCLC staff in facilitating the study
study findings
Study Findings
  • In mid-2003, 11 of 40 food enterprises within Fuchsia Brands were farm-based (28%).
  • 15 of 71 tourist establishments within the Brand are farm-based (21%).
  • Overall, farm-based operators represent 26 of 111 businesses with Fuchsia Brands (23%).
profile of farm households
Profile of Farm Households
  • Questionnaire answered by the owner of the business in 80% of cases.
  • 56% of respondents were female
  • 8% of respondents younger than 40 years of age
  • 44% between 40 and 50 years
  • 4% older than 65 years
profile of farm households1
Profile of Farm Households
  • Vast majority working full time on farm work with full time assistance of family members in many cases
  • 36% employing full time or part time labour to run the farm
  • On-farm activities (farming plus others) account for total family income in 2/3 of cases
  • Off-farm incomes features in less than 1/3 of cases
engagement in on farm activities
Engagement in On-Farm Activities
  • Over 2/3 of respondents engaged in “broadening” activities, with over half engaged in agri-tourism
  • Remainder engaged in landscape management schemes
  • 48% engaged in on-farm food processing
  • 32% engaged in direct selling of produce
  • N.B. Households engagement in multiple activities
interest in on farm activities
Interest in On-Farm Activities
  • None engaged in organic farming, but 28% interested
  • 12% engaged in agri-environment or landscape management activities but 44% interested
  • None engaged in energy production on-farm but 52% interested
contribution of rural development rd activity to family income
Contribution of Rural Development (RD) Activity to Family Income
  • Activities appear to make a substantial contribution to family incomes of respondents
  • 20% reported it constituted more than 80% of total farm-based family income
  • 20% said it contributed less than 20% of total income generated from “farm-based” activities
contribution of rd activities to employment
Contribution of RD Activities to Employment
  • In all cases, RD activity requires full time family labour input with between 1 and 4 family members involved
  • In 60% of cases, additional family labour is involved on a part-time basis
  • 76% of those surveyed take on hired labour on a full-time, part-time or casual basis.
  • 52 people employed full time, 15 part time and 12 casuals.
other effects of new rd activity
Other Effects of New RD Activity
  • 80% of respondents said it had a positive effect on the farm
  • Reasons included additional income generated
  • Allowed the family to stay on the farm
  • Farm would not be viable in the absence of the activity
driving forces constraints on rd activities
Driving Forces/Constraints on RD Activities
  • Following were described as “very important” drivers
  • Identified area as suitable for the activity (84%)
  • Needed the income (80%)
  • Personal interest/skills (68%)
  • Saw a market for the product/service (60%)
principal constraints
Principal Constraints
  • Lack of access to grant aid/financial support (20%)
  • Problems in building up markets (16%)
  • Picture with respect to drivers quite similar to results from EU IMPACT study which included analysis for Ireland
role of institutions in enabling rd activities
Role of Institutions in Enabling RD Activities
  • Role of WCLC/Fuchsia regarded by 72% as favourable
  • Teagasc regarded favourably by 68% of respondents
  • European Union seen favourably by 64%, closely followed by national governments at 60%.
  • Local governments/county councils regarded favourably by 36% of respondents
comparison with irish impact results
Comparison with Irish IMPACT Results
  • European Union seen favourably by 84%
  • Teagasc regarded favourably by 75% of respondents
  • Development agencies favourably regarded by 68% of respondents
  • Nationa/local governments/county councils regarded favourably by 45% of respondents
respondents views re fuchsia brands initiative
Respondents Views re Fuchsia Brands Initiative
  • High level of satisfaction with initiative evidenced by 92% of respondents who wish to continue involvement with the brand
  • 80% of respondents rated themselves as having a high level of awareness of other Brand products and services
  • Over 90% recommend and promote other Fuchsia products and services on a “very frequent” basis
  • High level of satisfaction with quality criteria standards for Brand membership – seen as the main benefit of the Initiative
respondents views re fuchsia brands initiative1
Respondents Views re Fuchsia Brands Initiative
  • Access to Training considered next most important benefit
  • Extra sales of products identified by 36% of respondents
  • Development potential within the Initiative identified with respect to establishing more individual and group-based marketing initiatives
  • Especially relevant for tourism providers
  • Marketing coverage of the Brand extended
concluding remarks
Concluding Remarks
  • Evidence of “localisation” effects
  • Evidence of “synergy effects” especially with respect between components of the brand but also with environmental quality
  • Evidence of multiplier effects through employment and through backward and forward linkages