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Conference on “Calamities: Nature or Human Action? Challenges and Responsibilities ” March 05, 2014, New Delhi Ris PowerPoint Presentation
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Conference on “Calamities: Nature or Human Action? Challenges and Responsibilities ” March 05, 2014, New Delhi Rising Calamities: Impact and Challenges G. Padmanabhan, UNDP. Global Assessment Report -2013.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Conference on

“Calamities: Nature or Human Action?

Challenges and Responsibilities”

March 05, 2014, New Delhi

Rising Calamities: Impact and Challenges

G. Padmanabhan, UNDP

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Global Assessment Report -2013

  • Total direct losses in 40 low and middle income countries amount to US$305 billion over the last 30 years; of these more than 30 percent were not internationally reported.
  • The impact of disasters travel across boundaries in a globalised world - EQ/Tsunami in Japan and Floods in Thailand
  • Insurance may enable businesses to compensate for both direct loss as well as supply chain interruption
  • When disaster strikes the impact on business is much larger - skilled workers, market share, relationships with suppliers and partners.
  • Risks to natural capital compromise future wealth
  • The required shift to anticipate risks in public and private investment remains a challenge
  • Tourism investment comes with high levels of disaster risk
  • Out of trillions of dollars to be invested in future development, around 70% will come from non – Government partners
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Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction

  • Assessing risk: Economic losses of hundreds of billions of dollars are projected to double by 2030. Everyday local events and chronic stresses involving multiple risks are making communities vulnerable.
  • Urban risk needs to be more fully understood.
  • Leading at the local level: Disasters happen locally and solutions are to be found locally. National governments to establish a framework and enabling environment for local action.
  • Recognizing the private sector as actor and partner: Steering private investment towards greater resilience makes good business sense.
  • Strengthening scientific and technical support.
  • There is an unmet demand for data, tools, methods and guidance on implementing risk reduction, and a shortage of specialists educated and trained for the task. There is a critical need to include disaster risk across all disciplines.
states needing attention

Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Gujarat, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal need special attention.

  • Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Rajasthan, West Bengal, and Uttar Pradesh accounted for 83 % of NDRF release over the last 16 years.
States needing attention
challenges

CHALLENGES

Changes in climate presenting new trends and patterns

Capacity of functionaries and institutions not adequate to understand risk and address mitigation through sectoral activities

How do we reduce existing risk

Rigid guidelines on unit costs prevent approval of incremental costs required for incorporating safety features

Partnership with non-Government development partners not adequate, and Government alone cant reduce risk

Weak legal provisions

Overcoming inadequate enforcement capacities

Last Mile connectivity still a distant possibility

Dearth of professionals and inadequate training capacities

Addressing specific requirements of the vulnerable people

Inadequate platforms for sharing of knowledge and information

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Emerging Trends

  • Development and resilience are unlikely to be sustained unless disaster risk is explicitly addressed in all development initiatives.
  • Target the root causes of risk (Priority 4 of the Hyogo Framework for Action): Tackle risk drivers
  • Connect mutually reinforcing agendas: Both the accumulation and reduction of disaster risk are closely intertwined with the fields of sustainable development, environmental protection and climate change as well as human mobility.