slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
PennDOT Strategic Recycling Program Highlights PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
PennDOT Strategic Recycling Program Highlights

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 53

PennDOT Strategic Recycling Program Highlights - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 161 Views
  • Uploaded on

PennDOT Strategic Recycling Program Highlights. Background. Apex holds multiple contracts with PENNDOT Technical Assistance to Strategic Environmental Management (SEM) Program Office.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'PennDOT Strategic Recycling Program Highlights' - karik


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

PennDOT

Strategic Recycling Program

Highlights

0

background
Background
  • Apex holds multiple contracts with PENNDOT
  • Technical Assistance to Strategic Environmental Management (SEM) Program Office.
  • PENNDOT Strategic Recycling Plan: Research, specifications, project development, communications, contracting.
  • Use of recycled materials on maintenance and construction projects

1

objective of srp
Objective of SRP

The objective of the SRP is “to realize economic savings and environmental enhancement to PENNDOT and the Commonwealth through the continued development of pollution prevention, recycling, energy efficiency, and sound environmental management practices”.

2

srp key focus areas
SRP Key Focus Areas

Five key focus areas will be targeted to achieve and sustain PENNDOT’s mission to increase utilization of recycled materials in transportation engineering applications:

  • Research
  • Specifications
  • Project Development
  • Outreach
  • Contract Bidding

3

apex as penndot recycling coordinator
Apex as PENNDOT Recycling Coordinator

PENNDOT SEM

Program Office

Contractors

PADEP

Outreach

Material

Suppliers

A-EFirms

Government

Agencies

Research

Institutions

PENNDOT Bureaus

PENNDOT Engineering Districts

4

recyclable products materials
Recyclable Products/Materials
  • Scrap tires
  • Crushed Glass
  • Fly ash, bottom ash, MSWI ash, kiln dust
  • Slag and spent foundry sand
  • Compost (spent mushroom soil,
  • biosolids and leaf compost)
  • Asphalt shingles
  • Plastics, wood, aluminum
  • RPCC, RAP

Ground asphalt shingles for use as an asphalt additive

5

critical factors
Critical Factors

The SRP allows PENNDOT to systematically implement and sustain its recycling program. Factors that are critical to the success of this program are:

  • Use of recycled materials should be cost competitive – not subsidized or mandated
  • Recycled materials should perform as well as conventional materials
  • There must be product consistency and quality control
  • Communications

7

slide9

Recent Demonstration Projects

Glass cullet as aggregate in base course asphalt along shoulder of SR4013 in Manheim, Lancaster County.

9

slide10

Recent Demonstration Projects

Installation of 2,000 tons of glass cullet between jersey barrier and sound wall along I-95 in Tinicum, Delaware County.

10

slide11

Recent Demonstration Projects

Test trench containing

flowable fill with recycled

foundry sand as aggregate.

Other usable aggregates

include cullet, ash, and slag.

Flowable fill is used to

backfill utility trenches,

sinkholes, and

bridge approaches.

11

slide12

Recent Demonstration Projects

Spent mushroom soil and

composted biosolids used as soil

amendment and mulch for new

plantings at Beltway Beautification

Project. (I-81/Rt. 322 interchange)

12

slide13

Recent Demonstration Projects

Carsonite sound wall on I-78 bridge over Veracruz Road (Lehigh County). These sound walls are lightweight, modular, and contain recycled rubber.

13

slide14

Plasphalt Projects

Asphalt containing ~1.5% TRPA substituted for stone aggregate.

Incorporated in 9.5 mm Superpave wearing course

TRPA: treated recycled plastic aggregate (shredded plastic)

  • Acts like chewing gum
  • Improves rutting resistance
  • Liquid Fuels Money applied

Engineering District 5-0

Wilson Boro:

115 tons @ $78.89/ton

Hay Terrace:

400 tons (lump sum bid)

14

slide15

Post Consumer Shingles Projects

SR 4033, Bucks County, Engineering District 6-0

Control Section: 9.5 mm Superpave Virgin AC (1,300 tons)

1st Section: 9.5 mm Superpave w/ 5% shingles (1,000 tons)

2nd Section: 9.5 mm Superpave w/ 5% shingles, 10% RAP (1,000 tons)

Bid as conventional paving

Contractor initiated substitution

2-3 days paving

Shingles 1.5% Asphalt content

100% passing 0.5-inch sieve

95% passing 3/8-inch sieve

RAP 0.5 % Asphalt content

15

slide16

The Tire Problem - Pennsylvania

  • 12 million scrap tires are generated each year
  • 16 million currently stockpiled
  • Breeding ground for mosquitoes and rodents
  • West Nile virus concerns
  • Fires are hard to control and emit pollutants
  • Waste Tire Recycling Act (Act 190) is designed to reduce the waste tire problem

16

slide17

Tire Shred Use in Construction

  • Lightweight fill (40 to 60 pcf)
  • Mitigates slope stability or landslide problems
  • Mitigates excessive foundation settlement
  • Conventional fill (75 tires per cubic yard of fill)
  • Retaining wall and bridge abutment backfill
  • Insulation to limit frost penetration
  • French drains and drainage layers for roads

17

penndot padep collaboration
PENNDOT-PADEP Collaboration
  • First scrap tire recycling project in PA.
  • 750,000 tires (7,500 tons) used
  • Scrap tires from 7 community collection days, river sweeps, 6 abandoned tire piles, PADEP consent orders
  • Shredded tires used as lightweight geotechnical fill (50 1b/ft3)
  • Joint funding provided by PADEP

18

project specifications
Project specifications
  • Tire Shreds
    • Length
    • Gradation
    • Deleterious materials
    • Free Steel
    • Exposed Steel
  • Embankment
  • Instrumentation

21

tire shred specifications
Tire Shred Specifications

LENGTH: Not more than 1% and 10% (by weight) having a maximum dimension greater than 18-inches and 12-inches, respectively.

GRADATION

SIEVE SIZE

PERCENT PASSING

8 inches75-100%

3 inches50% max.

1.5 inches25% max.

No. 41% max.

22

tire shred specifications cont d
DELETERIOUS MATERIALS:

No oils, gasoline, diesel fuel, hydraulic fluid, grease, ice, and snow. No burnt tires.

FREE STEEL:

Less than 1% by weight of metal fragments.

EXPOSED METAL:

Provide at least 76% and 90% (by weight) of tire shreds with metal fragments encased in rubber that do not protrude more than 1- and 2-inches, respectively, from the cut edge of tire shreds.

Tire Shred Specifications (cont’d)

23

embankment instrumentation
Embankment Instrumentation
  • Vertical Inclinometers with settlement magnets
  • Automated Data Loggers & alarms
  • Web based reporting
  • Piezometers
  • Thermistors
  • Total Pressures cells
  • Settlement Plates

35

piezometers thermistors
Piezometers & Thermistors

Water Pressure (psi or kPa)

Temperature (°C or °F)

Cable lengths custom made

39

total pressure cells
Total Pressure Cells

Pressure (psi or kPa)

  • Embedded in concrete
  • Measures soil pressure
  • against abutments

41

total pressure cells installed
Total Pressure Cells—Installed

Embedded and calibrated in

1 ft by 1 ft concrete pads

Flush-mounted on abutment

formwork facing fill

42

slide43

Test

Parameter

Quarry-AR

Quarry-CF

Cullet-AR

Cullet-CF

Specific Gravity

ASTM D854

Gs (-)

2.48

---

2.49

---

Soil Classification

ASTM D421, D422

USCS

AASHTO

SW

No. 10

GP

No. 8

SW

No. 10

GP

No. 8

Standard Compaction

ASTM D698

γd,max (lb/ft3)

γd,max [kN/m3]

wopt (%)

111.9

17.6

11.9

93.5

14.7

6.5

107.5

16.9

13.2

99.2

15.6

12

Modified Compaction

ASTM D1557

γd,max (lb/ft3)

γd,max [kN/m3]

wopt (%)

117

18.4

10.8

108.1

17.0

7.8

111.9

17.6

10.8

108.7

17.1

9.9

Direct Shear Test†

ASTM D3080

φds (°)

61

54

56

48

CD* Triaxial Test†

US Army COE

φtx (°)

47

45

46

44

Key Crushed Glass Properties

43

slide44
Foundation Drainage

Drainage Blankets

French/Interceptor Drains

Sand Filters (Wastewater)

Well Packing Media

Septage Field Media

Leachate Collection Media

Glass Cullet Applications

  • Base Course
  • Subbase
  • Embankments
  • Structural Fill
  • Nonstructural Fill
  • Utility Bedding and Backfill
  • Retaining Wall Backfill
  • Vapor Extraction Trenches

44

slide45

CG in SVE trenches

  • Challenge: SVE system needed near beach in coastal DE
  • Very sandy soils: need SVE trenches of greater permeability
  • Aggregates imported from inland quarries-- $$$
  • CG from Ocean City, MD
  • 3/8” minus CG used
  • CG: $10/cy; Rock: $29.25/cy
  • 18 cy CG used
  • 30% savings where used.

45

glass soil blending study
Glass-Soil Blending Study
  • Concern:
    • “Modest” cohesion of the crushed glass (CG) suggested potential instability of shallow utility trenches and excavations.
  • Action:
    • Evaluated how soil blending could improve the cohesion characteristics of CG
    • Evaluated how CG blending improved the geotechnical characteristics of marginal soils (quarry fines, spoils).

46

focus of the laboratory investigation
Focus of the Laboratory Investigation
  • Crushed glass was blended with two clayey soils to evaluate improvement in cohesion
    • Kaolin Clay
    • Silty sand from King of Prussia, PA
  • A variety of marginal soils were blended with crushed glass to evaluate improvement in strength characteristics.
    • (K) Kaolinite
    • (KP) King of Prussia soil
    • (QF) Quarry fines (sandy silt)
    • (QS) Quarry screenings (coarse to fine sand)

47

findings modified proctor compaction tests
Findings – Modified Proctor Compaction Tests
  • The maximum dry density of the soil-glass blends generally increased as soil content increased from 10% to 35%, but decreased thereafter.
  • The optimum water content of the soil-glass blends generally decreased as soil content increased from 10% to 35%, but increased thereafter.

49

findings direct shear tests
Findings – Direct Shear Tests
  • The friction angle of the K, KP and QF soil-glass blends generally tended to decrease with increasing soil content. The friction angle of the QS-glass blends remained the same or slightly increased.
  • Cohesion generally increased (K, KP, QF soils) or remained the same (QS soil) as the soil content increased.

51

practical implications improving marginal soils
Practical Implications – Improving Marginal Soils
  • Addition of CG to the K, KP and QF soils increased maximum density values and lowered water requirements.
  • Addition of CG to the K, KP and QF soils considerably increased frictional strength.
  • CG blending made marginal soils (K, KP and QF) attractive candidates for use as structural fill, backfill and embankment construction.
  • The findings suggest that the engineering strength properties of other marginal soils (e.g., dredge and mining materials) may be significantly enhanced via blending with CG.

52

contact information
Contact Information

Kenneth J. Thornton, PG

PENNDOT Pollution Prevention Section

400 North Street

Harrisburg, PA 17105

53