How We Eat…and How It Affects Our Health and Society - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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How We Eat…and How It Affects Our Health and Society

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  1. How We Eat…and How It Affects Our Health and Society Mary Stein, MS Department of Health and Human Development Montana Team Nutrition Program mstein@montana.edu

  2. Question?Have you ever thought about how the rest of the world eats compared to how we eat in the US?

  3. Japan: The Ukita family of Kodaira CityFood expenditure for one week: 37,699 Yen or $317.25Favorite foods: sashimi, fruit, cake, potato chips

  4. Italy: The Manzo family of SicilyFood expenditure for one week: 214.36 Euros or $260.11Favorite foods: fish, pasta with ragu, hot dogs, frozen fish sticks

  5. Chad: The Aboubakar family of Breidjing CampFood expenditure for one week: 685 CFA Francs or $1.23Favorite foods: soup with fresh sheep meat

  6. Kuwait: The Al Haggan family of Kuwait CityFood expenditure for one week: 63.63 dinar or $221.45 Family recipe: Chicken biryani with basmati rice

  7. China: The Dong family of BeijingFood expenditure for one week: 1,233.76 Yuan or $155.06Favorite foods: fried shredded pork with sweet and sour sauce

  8. Egypt: The Ahmed family of CairoFood expenditure for one week: 387.85 Egyptian Pounds or $68.53Family recipe: Okra and mutton

  9. Poland: The Sobczynscy family of Konstancin-JeziornaFood expenditure for one week: 582.48 Zlotys or $151.27Family recipe: Pig's knuckles with carrots, celery and parsnips

  10. Ecuador: The Ayme family of TingoFood expenditure for one week: $31.55Family recipe: Potato soup with cabbage

  11. Mongolia: The Batsuuri family of UlaanbaatarFood expenditure for one week: 41,985.85 togrogs or $40.02Family recipe: Mutton dumplings

  12. Bhutan: The Namgay family of Shingkhey VillageFood expenditure for one week: 224.93 ngultrum or $5.03Family recipe: Mushroom, cheese and pork

  13. Germany: The Melander family of BargteheideFood expenditure for one week: 375.39 Euros or $500.07Favorite foods: fried potatoes with onions, bacon and herring, fried noodles with eggs and cheese, pizza, vanilla pudding

  14. Mexico: The Casales family of CuernavacaFood expenditure for one week: 1,862.78 Mexican Pesos or $189.09Favorite foods: pizza, crab, pasta, chicken

  15. Great Britain: The Bainton family of Cllingbourne DucisFood expenditure for one week: 155.54 British Pounds or $253.15Favorite foods: avocado, mayonnaise sandwich, prawn cocktail, chocolate fudge cake with cream

  16. United States: The Caven family of CaliforniaFood expenditure for one week: $159.18Favorite foods: beef stew, berry yogurt sundae, clam chowder, ice cream

  17. United States: The Revis family of North CarolinaFood expenditure for one week: $341.98Favorite foods: spaghetti, potatoes, sesame chicken

  18. How Is the Way We Eat in the US Affecting Our Health?

  19. Kids Health is in Jeopardy • 16% of kids (ages 6-19) are overweight • Higher in certain ethnic subgroups

  20. Percentage of U.S. Children and Adolescents Who Were Overweight* Ages 12-19 Ages 6-11 1963-70 data are from 1963-65 for children 6-11 years of age and from 1966-70 for adolescents 12-17 years of age * >95th percentile for BMI by age and sex based on 2000 CDC BMI-for-age growth charts Source: National Center for Health Statistics

  21. Percentage of U.S. Children and Adolescents Who Were Overweight* 15 Ages 12-19 5 4 Ages 6-11 * >95th percentile for BMI by age and sex based on 2000 CDC BMI-for-age growth charts **Data are from 1963-65 for children 6-11 years of age and from 1966-70 for adolescents 12-17 years of age Source: National Center for Health Statistics

  22. Increase in Overweight/ObesityADULTS • From 1980 – 2000, obesity rates in U.S. doubled among adults aged 20-74 From 15% - up to 31% (From the National Center on Health Statistics) • 65% of the US population is categorized as overweight or obese

  23. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  24. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  25. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  26. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  27. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  28. No Data <10% 10%–14% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  29. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  30. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  31. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  32. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  33. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  34. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  35. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  36. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  37. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  38. No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20 Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person)

  39. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  40. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  41. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  42. Obesity* Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

  43. Consequences of Obesity Increased Risk for Many Chronic Diseases

  44. Adults Diagnosed with Diabetes

  45. Type 2 Diabetes • Centers for Disease Control estimates that one in three people born in the U.S. in 2000 will develop diabetes sometime in their life – unless significant changes in eating and exercise habits occur. 1 Prevalence of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Adults – United States, 1999-2000, MMWR, Sept. 5, 2003; 52(35);833-837

  46. Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) • Heart Disease and Strokes • CVD accounts for 40% of deaths in the U.S. • Risk Factors for CVD: • Tobacco use, high cholesterol levels, lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, high blood pressure and diabetes 1 Preventing Heart Disease and Stroke: Addressing the Nation’s Leading Killers. CDC: April, 2003

  47. So what? “For the first time in this country’s history, health experts question if this generation of children will be first to lead shorter lives.”~ The Obesity Epidemic http://www.nsba.org/site/docs/32700/32675.pdf retrieved 3-6-06

  48. What has changed? Why are Americans Gaining Weight?

  49. Portion Size…It’s Out of Control

  50. What Are Healthy Portion Sizes?