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Art Movements

Art Movements

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Art Movements

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  1. Art Movements The –isms The Remixing of Art

  2. Renaissance • 1400-1550 (includes early, high, Venetian, and Italian Renaissance) • “Renaissance” means rebirth – a return of classical ideas from Ancient Rome and Greece. • Natural approach to depiction of the human figure – anatomically and scientifically correct. • Raised the status of artists in society to be on par with writers and philosophers. • Classical content – human figure, religious figures (Madonna, baby Jesus, angels).

  3. Rennaisance

  4. Mannerism • 1520-1580 • Personalized and idealized interpretation of figures, rather than “true to nature” depiction of Renaissance artists. • Exaggerated and elegant representation of figures.

  5. Mannerism

  6. Baroque • 1600-1700 • Reaction against artificial stylization of the Mannerists. • Realistic interpretation; figures in action; emotional. • Religious, mythical, historical subjects. • Used as propaganda for the Church and State.

  7. Baroque Art as a weapon in religious wars.

  8. Rococo • 1700-1775 • Decorative response to Baroque. • Said to be refined and elegant by some, pompous and pretentious by others.

  9. Rococo

  10. NeoClassicism • 1765-1850 • Reaction to the pompous-ness of Rococo. • Age of the Enlightenment; political, social, and cultural revolutions. • Needed/wanted serious art that reflected more serious times. • Historical scenes of heroism and virtuosity for political propaganda.

  11. NeoClassicism

  12. Romanticism • 1765-1850 • Valued expression of emotion over the control of Classicism. • Emotive and sensual subjects.

  13. Romanticism Imagination and individuality.

  14. Romanticism Imagination and individuality.

  15. Realism • 1840-1880 • Focused on everyday reality of subject. • Reaction against heightened emotions of Romanticism. • Objective truth; social realities. • Inspired by “visual reality” theme brought about by the invention of photography in 1840s.

  16. Realism Revolted against typical subjects; painted “real” life and ordinary subjects.

  17. Impressionism • 1870-1890 • Analyzed color and light in nature. • Lost much of the outline and detail of their subjects. • Strayed from realistic portrayal of subjects.

  18. Impressionism Painted light rather than a subject.

  19. Post-Impressionism • 1885-1905 • Rebelled against Impressionism. • Not one set style – collection of many artists and styles that were all reacting to Impressionism’s formless, unstructured style.

  20. Post Impressionism Revolted against Impressionism; reintroduced structure to the paintings.

  21. Expressionism • 1905-1925 • Emotional or spiritual vision of the world.

  22. Expressionism Used emotion to distort form.

  23. Cubism • 1907-1915 • Show many views of the subject at the same time. • Referenced other cultures as inspiration – specifically African art.

  24. Cubism Experiments; new art forms to reflect modern times.

  25. Dada • 1916-1922 • Not a style, per se, more of a reaction to the social, political, and cultural things going on at the time that led Europe to WW1. • “Anti-art” stance. Attempted to provoke other artists by doing things “wrong.”

  26. Dada

  27. Surrealism • 1924-1939 • Positive response to Dada’s negativity. • Goal was to liberate an artist’s imagination by tapping into the unconciousand fine a “superior reality” – a sur-reality.

  28. Surrealism Painting dreams and exploring the unconcious.

  29. Abstract Expressionism • 1946-1956 • First American art style that influenced art globally. • Physical act of painting is as important as the result.

  30. Abstract Expressionism Abstraction and expression without form.