Reporting based on adirondack s just about managing lvsc london 1998
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REPORTING (based on Adirondack, S, ‘Just About Managing’, LVSC, London, 1998). Start by asking yourself the following: Why am I reporting? What is the purpose? Information – telling people what has happened or is going to happen Question – get information from others

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Reporting based on adirondack s just about managing lvsc london 1998
REPORTING(based on Adirondack, S, ‘Just About Managing’, LVSC, London, 1998)

Start by asking yourself the following:

  • Why am I reporting? What is the purpose?

    • Information – telling people what has happened or is going to happen

    • Question – get information from others

    • Persuade – influence others thinking/beliefs

    • Action – ask or tell others to do something

    • Background for discussion/consultation – enabling others to participate

    • Background for decision – enabling others to reach a decision

    • Confirmation – of something already discussed/agreed

    • Historical record – so that people know what happened and why


Reporting
REPORTING

Then ask yourself:

  • What does the reader need to know to fulfil this purpose?

    • Provide enough information to fill this need, without providing so much that they get overwhelmed or lost in detail.

  • Is there anything else they would like to know?

    • Only include if there is a legitimate justification and only if it does not distract from the primary purpose(s) of the report.


Structuring your report
STRUCTURING YOUR REPORT

This is a general structure:

  • Heading – include:

    • Title

    • Date

    • Author(s)

    • Whether a draft and, if so, draft number

    • For whom it is intended – individuals, committee etc.

    • Whether for discussion, consultation or decision

    • Reference number, especially if there are several documents on an agenda.


Structuring your report1
STRUCTURING YOUR REPORT

  • Introduction – A brief statement of:

    • what the report is about

    • why it was written

    • who wrote it

    • the main issues

    • what action, if any, is required

  • Background – What led up to the problem or situation

  • Present situation – Facts and opinions, clearly separated


Structuring your report2
STRUCTURING YOUR REPORT

  • Implications for the future – Again, facts and opinions, clearly separated. Implications might include:

    • Financial

    • Legal

    • Staffing

    • Premises

    • Time

    • Effect on other activities

  • Summary – Brief restatement of the main points


Structuring your report3
STRUCTURING YOUR REPORT

  • Proposal(s)/recommendations for action

    • Include only where it is appropriate for you to do so

    • Advantages and disadvantages of each proposal should be included

    • If appropriate, which course of action is recommended

  • Action

    • Either ‘for information only, no action is required’

    • Or ‘to decide whether to take action, what needs to be done, who needs to do it, to whom they are responsible and a deadline for the action’