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Myths and Facts on Collegiate Soccer and Soccer Scholarships. Presented by the East Brunswick Soccer Club June 8, 2009. © 2009, East Brunswick Soccer Club, East Brunswick, NJ 08816. 1. Introduction Heard on the sidelines … Collegiate soccer by the numbers Myths and facts

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myths and facts on collegiate soccer and soccer scholarships

Myths and Factson Collegiate Soccer and Soccer Scholarships

Presented by the East Brunswick Soccer Club

June 8, 2009

© 2009, East Brunswick Soccer Club, East Brunswick, NJ 08816

tonight s program
1. Introduction

Heard on the sidelines …

Collegiate soccer by the numbers

Myths and facts

2. The recruiting process

Coaches’ perspectives:

Glenn Crooks, head women’s coach, Rutgers University

Julian Richens, assistant men’s coach, Rider University

Players’ perspectives:

Alyssa Sotomayor, junior, Ithaca College (D3)

Evan Brandsdorfer, sophomore, Temple University (D1)

Parent’s perspective:

Ron Brandsdorfer, parent and president, East Brunswick Soccer Club

3. Athletic scholarships

Numbers and dollars

4. What to do right now

5. Q&A

Tonight’s program
heard on the sidelines
"I moved my daughter to an elite team to improve her chances of getting a college athletic scholarship." Parent of a 9-year-old player

"I know a player who got a full ride -- everything covered for four years." Parent

"I really love soccer, but I’d rather be a student than a student-athlete." EBHS senior soccer player

Heard on the sidelines …
by the numbers
Number of collegiate teams

Men’s:

D1 207; D2 185; D3 397

Women’s

D1 321; D2 226; D3 423

Number of current athletes

Men’s: 17,000

Women’s: 21,000

Number of high school soccer players

Boys: 330,044

Girls: 270,273

Key fact: Just 5% of all boys and girls who play high school sports go on to play collegiate sports

By the numbers
myths and facts
Myths and Facts
  • Myths and Facts
    • Colleges and the NCAA make it easy for athletes to do well – Basketweaving 101
      • 6 a.m. weightlifting, practices, team meetings, study halls, long trips to games
      • New NCAA requirements -- graduation rates, GPA
    • There’s a lot of scholarship money out there, especially for women (due to Title IX)
      • Excluding the glamor sports of football and men’s basketball, the average NCAA scholarship: $8,707
      • Typical baseball player, track and field: $2,000
myths and facts cont d
Myths and Facts (cont’d)

If you’re not playing for an elite team and paying $4,000 a year for youth soccer, you have no chance to play in college

D1, D2, D3, NAIA, club, intramurals

If you’re a good player, collegiate coaches will see you, recruit you

Takes a lot of hard work – a family project

6

coaches perspectives
Coaches’ perspectives
  • How coaches recruit
  • What they look for
  • Where they see players
  • Club vs. high school soccer
  • Do’s and don’ts in reaching out to college coaches
players perspectives
Players’ perspectives
  • Collegiate soccer – yes or no?
  • Developing a visibility plan
  • Support circle – travel coaches, high school coaches, other
  • Researching and visiting colleges
  • What it’s like to be a collegiate athlete (time involved, commitment, ups and downs, balancing athletics and academics)
a parent s perspective
A parent’s perspective

Supporting – not pushing – your child

Not all collegiate players are actively recruited

Taking responsibility for the process

Do-it-yourself outreach

Using a recruiting service

Visiting coaches and schools

What to look for

Promises, promises

9

athletic scholarships
Athletic scholarships
  • D1 Men’s maximum – 9.9 scholarships
    • 330,000 high school players
    • 2,300 scholarships awarded
    • 6,000 students receiving scholarships
    • $8,533 yearly value ($16,698 for basketball; $12,980 for football)
  • D1 Women’s maximum – 14 scholarships
    • 270,000 high school players
    • 3,900 scholarships awarded
    • 9,300 students receiving scholarships
    • $8,404 yearly value ($20,540 for ice hockey)
  • What does that mean?
    • Head count vs. equivalency sports
athletic scholarships cont d
Athletic scholarships (cont’d)

How do coaches decide?

The National Letter of Intent

Myth of the “full ride”

Important web site:

https://web1.ncaa.org/eligibilitycenter/student/index_student.html

11

slide12
“Kids who have worked their whole life trying to get a scholarship think the hard part is over when they get the college money. They don’t know that it’s a whole new monster when you get here. Yes, all the hard work paid off. And now you have to work harder.”

-- Villanova baseball player

12

what to do right now
What to do right now
  • Love the game
  • Maintain your commitment to excellence … on the field, in the classroom, in the community
  • Step back and think – right reasons vs. wrong reasons
  • Consider the options
  • Talk to collegiate athletes
slide14
Q&A
  • Any questions?
ncaa recruiting regulations
NCAA recruiting regulations
  • Freshman and Sophomore year of High School(and until Sept. 1 of Junior Year)
  • Coaches may:
  • Send questionnaires, sports camp brochures, and NCAA Educational Information
  • Accept phone calls placed by prospects at their own expense, but may not return voicemail messages from prospects.
  • Coaches may NOT:
  • Initiate phone calls to prospects.
  • Send any other written recruiting materials to prospects
  • Unofficial Visits
  • Prospects can make unofficial visits to campus
  • Can receive up to three complimentary admissions to a campus sporting event
  • May talk in person with college coaches only on the college campus
ncaa recruiting regulations16
NCAA recruiting regulations
  • September 1st of your Junior Year
  • Coaches may send information about their school or program (personalized letters, photocopies of newspaper clippings, media guides, schedule cards, and official university academic and admissions publications)
  • Coaches may also reply to your emails or send email
  • July 1st after your Junior Year
  • Coaches are only allowed to make one phone call per week to you or your parents. (Coaches may accept unlimited phone calls that are initiated by prospects at any time)
  • A college coach may contact you in person off the college campus only on or after July 1st after completion of your junior year. Any face-to-face meeting between a college coach and you or your parents, during which any of you say more than "hello" is considered a contact.
ncaa recruiting regulations17
NCAA recruiting regulations
  • Senior Year
  • Coaches can send written correspondence and make telephone calls as listed under July 1st after your Junior Year.
  • You are only allowed to make 5 Official - expense paid visits to college campuses. Your visit to the campus may not last longer than 48 hours. These visits can occur no earlier than your first day of classes of your senior year.
  • Coaches must have an official SAT or ACT score and a copy of your official high school transcript before this visit can take place.
  • Recruiting at Tournaments
  • At a tournament, if a coach does not talk to you, it's not because he is being rude. The NCAA has specific rules about recruiting which limits communication at tournaments.
  • At tournaments, coaches are not allowed to have any personal contact with student-athletes. It is, however, permissible to say "hello" in passing. Anything more than "hello" is considered a contact.
  • A conversation, other than a simple greeting, with a parent or guardian at a tournament site, is considered a contact.
  • A coach may sit down with a parent or guardian at a competition site. This will count towards one of the three in-person off-campus recruiting contacts a coach is allowed.