ee113d project heap sort n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
EE113D Project: Heap Sort PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
EE113D Project: Heap Sort

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 18

EE113D Project: Heap Sort - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 134 Views
  • Uploaded on

EE113D Project: Heap Sort. Shuofei Geng Michael Utanes Felix Lu. Heap Sort - Motivation. Concept of Sorting present in everyday life: Sorting a list of grades MP3 Files on a computer Names on a phone Directory

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

EE113D Project: Heap Sort


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. EE113D Project: Heap Sort Shuofei Geng Michael Utanes Felix Lu

    2. Heap Sort - Motivation • Concept of Sorting present in everyday life: • Sorting a list of grades • MP3 Files on a computer • Names on a phone Directory • More advanced engineering problems rely on efficient sorting problems • Heap Sort one of the best general-purpose sorting algorithms • Applications: • Priority Queues, • Interval Scheduling

    3. 5 1 3 2 1 3 2 4 4 5 Heap Sort – Project Goals • Implement the Max Heap Sort Algorithm • Utilize existing C code and convert to assembly language for use on using the DSK Plus Board • Input data a random array of integer values • Output data an array sorted in ascending order

    4. What is Heap Sort? • Sorting Algorithm that first places objects into a heap • Heap organized such that the largest value can easily be extracted while preserving heap structure • Each time we delete (extract) the maximum, we place at next open position from the end of the sorted array • Keep extracting largest value of heap until none remains, giving the elements in order Heap of remaining unsorted elements Sorted elements

    5. 16 15 13 14 12 10 11 8 5 3 4 6 2 1 The Heap • Heap can be represented as a balanced binary tree • Each element is stored at a node. • Max-Value at root of tree • Heap Order: A Parent node can have two Child Nodes • The value of the Parent node always larger than the Child Nodes

    6. 16 15 13 14 12 10 11 8 5 3 4 6 2 1 Heap Sort – SiftDown Operation • The siftDown() function is used to build and reconstruct the heap • function sift(a, start, count) { //Organize Heap • var int root := start, child //node in position i is parent of the nodes in positions 2*i and (2*i+1) • while root * 2 + 1 < count { //compare with two children, make swap • child := root * 2 + 1 //if chlidren larger than value; if not keep traversing • if child < count - 1 and a[child] < a[child + 1] • child := child + 1 • if a[root] < a[child] • swap(a[root], a[child]) • root := child • else • return • } • }

    7. Heap Sort : Pseudocode • function heapSort(a, count) { • var int start := count ÷ 2 - 1, • end := count - 1 • while start ≥ 0 //Build Heap • sift(a, start, count) • start := start - 1 • while end > 0 • swap(a[end], a[0]) //Root Deletion • sift(a, 0, end) //Heap Reorganized • end := end - 1 • } • function sift(a, start, count) { //Organize Heap • var int root := start, child //node in position i is parent of the nodes in positions 2*i and (2*i + 1) • while root * 2 + 1 < count { //compare with two children, make swap • child := root * 2 + 1 //if chlidren larger than value; if not keep traversing • if child < count - 1 and a[child] < a[child + 1] • child := child + 1 • if a[root] < a[child] • swap(a[root], a[child]) • root := child • else • return • } • }

    8. Heap Sort : Pseudocode • Heap Sort

    9. Comparison with Other Sorts • Merge Sort & Quick Sort • Splits the items to be sorted into two groups, recursively sorts each group, and combines them into a final, sorted sequence • Generally faster than heap sort, due to better data cache performance

    10. Comparison with Other Sorts

    11. Applications of Heap Sort • Interval Scheduling • List of tasks with various start/finish times • Aim to perform tasks within specified time interval without overlapping • Sort finish time of tasks then take earliest finish time until all tasks performed • Priority Queue - Supports the following three operations: • Add an element to the queue with an associated priority • Remove the element from the queue that has highest priority, and return it • Peek at the element with highest priority without removing it • Ex. Bandwidth Management

    12. Heap Sort Implementation • Project Development • First decide on topic for implementation • Challenge: No previous Heap Sort project exists “Write Everything From Scratch” • Then Model Sorting algorithm with High Level Language (C or matlab) • Internet contains many topics/code on Heap Sort • Lastly, Program/Debug Max Heap Sorting Algorithm • Utilize existing C code and convert to assembly language for use on using the DSK Plus Board • Program consists of 2 files: randomno.asm, heapsort.asm

    13. Heap Sort Implementation • Program consists of two files: • randomno.asm - # list, containing 100 random #’s • To create list, we wrote a short C program “RandomNoGenerator.c” that outputs random #’s in assembly format i.e. “.word 4” • Then we copied the input data to the correct file type to represent random array • heapsort.asm – Executable code • Implements heap sort algorithm

    14. Heap Sort Implementation • heapsort.asm Design Challenges: • Use of Pointers • When to use “#” & “*” • Limited amount of Registers (AR0-AR7) • Comparison Operations • Flags TC & NTC • Function Usage • Implementation • Passing Parameters • Returning from Function • Adding “nop” instruction

    15. Heap Sort Implementation • heapsort.asm Debugging Challenge: • Adding “nop” Instruction • While executing program in whole program misbehaves • Due to certain instructions taking longer than a cycle to complete, thus not properly registering values in time • Solution: Add “nop” instruction between lines where this is true • Found by use of Breakpoints in code

    16. Heap Sort – Discussion of Results • Program correct in implementing Heap Sort • Output a sorted array • Also Concerned about Program Efficiency • Does it meet the time requirement O(n*log2(n)), where n is the # of elements in the array?

    17. Heap Sort – Discussion of Results • Does it meet the time requirement O(n*log2(n))? • 1st- Check # of times siftdown2() is called • After function returns, the 1st and last element of array is swapped • Process stops until function calls Max ‘n’ times • 2nd- See # iterations performed inside function • After every iteration, multiply the current index by 2 then use as current index • Since only checking index which is in power of 2 of the original root passed in as parameter, we can do at most log2(n) operations • Therefore O(n*log2(n)) is satisfied

    18. Heap Sort - Summary • Positives: • Does not require multiple arrays • Does not include recursion • Optimal for large data sets • Runs well with computers with slow data caches • Negatives: • Generally Slower than Merge Sort/Quick Sort • Unstable