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Current Biodiversity Observation in Indonesia Dedy Darnaedi Herbarium Bogoriense (BO), Research Center for Biology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Bogor, Indonesia darnaedi@gmail.com 5 th AP-BON Meeting Los Banos , Laguna, Philippines, 25-28 November 2013.

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slide1

Current Biodiversity Observation

in Indonesia

DedyDarnaedi

Herbarium Bogoriense (BO),

Research Center for Biology,

Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Bogor, Indonesia

darnaedi@gmail.com

5thAP-BON Meeting

Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines, 25-28 November 2013

slide2

Out line of presentation:

  • Background
  • Specimen base data base
  • Observation base data base (permanent plot)
  • On going Monitoring System
    • LIPI, Sampling Plot
    • APBON, Altitudinal gradient
    • CIFOR, Spatial distribution
    • LTER, Spatial distribution in 1 ha plot
    • Fern Plots, Spatial distribution
  • Strengthen & maintenance national biodiversity

observation systems (integrate remotely-

sensed and in situ data)

indo australian archipelago malay archipelago malesiana south east asia
Indo-Australian Archipelago  Malay Archipelago Malesiana South East Asia

Wallace line

www.themegallery.com

slide4

Natural Resources Richness

Biogeography : located between two earth’s biogeography region Indo-Malaya and Oceania

Enormous topography,

47 ecosystem types,Malesiana

17.000 Islands, 7.7 million m2 and 5.8 million m2 (marine and coastal)

Mega diversity and center of divers : flowering plants (25-30.000 species), insect (250.000 species), mollusc (20.000 species), fish (8.500 species), bird (1.500 species), mammal (500 species), reptile (2.000 species), mushroom (12.000), etc.

Cultural diversity  More than 400 ethnic group, 665 different language and dialect

flora malesiana
Flora Malesiana

Malesia:

  • Brunei
  • Filipina
  • Indonesia
  • Malaysia
  • Papua Nugini
  • Singapura
  • Timor Leste

Endemic Genera

slide9

Exploration: Inventory, documenting plant, animal and microbes

(National program, international collaboration)

natural forest ecosystems in s e asia png fao 2001
Natural Forest Ecosystems in S. E. ASIA & PNG (FAO 2001)

In addition: Summit of mountain Jaya –Papua & permanent snow forest 4,000 m asl

slide12

Ecosystem Diversity in Indonesia

Altitudinal distribution and profile of vegetation types LORENTZ NATIONAL PARK (World HeritageSite) (After Kartawinata & Widjaja 1987)

curve species area species richness at forest ecosystem
Curve species-area: Species richness at forest ecosystem

---BatangGadis, North Sumatra

---Samboja, East Kalimantan

---Malinau, East Kalimanatn

--- Lore Lindu, Nort Sulawesi

---G.Gede West Java

---G.Halimun West Java

Number of species

Size of plots in (Ha)

1 saprosma arboreum
1. Saprosmaarboreum

Spatial Distribution of plant species within 0,4 ha,

Mt Gede-Pangrango National Park, West Java,

2 polyosma illicifolia
2. Polyosmaillicifolia

Spatial Distribution of plant species within 0,4 ha,

Mt Gede-Pangrango National Park, West Java,

slide20

Nikolaus Karger1*†, et al. 2013

Journal of Biogeography (J. Biogeogr.) (2013)

slide21

Journal of Biogeography (J. Biogeogr.) (2013)

Island biogeography from regional to local scales: evidence for a spatially scaled echo pattern of fern diversity in the Southeast Asian archipelago.

Dirk Nikolaus Karger1*†, Patrick Weigelt2†, Victor B. Amoroso3,

Dedy Darnaedi4, Arief Hidayat4, Holger Kreft2 and Michael Kessler1

slide22
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Networking System in RC Biology-LIPI(A prototype)

slide23

SBSTTA 17, Montreal-October 2013.

  • Mr. Scholes presented the report and conclusions of the Expert Workshop on enhancing biodiversity data and observing systems in support of the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011 – 2020, held on 12 October 2013 in Montreal, Canada. The objective of the Workshop had been to identify ways to improve the collection and use of data and share Parties’ experiences in monitoring and reporting progress made in the implementation of national biodiversity strategies and action plans. It had also been intended to raise awareness of available tools, products and approaches, as well as organizations and networks, that could help improve biodiversity monitoring.
  • The Workshop, which had been organized by Group on Earth Observations-Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO-BON) on the invitation of the Secretariat of the Convention, had been attended by 80 participants from over 40 different countries and a wide range of organizations. It had emerged that, although data was available on many subjects, significant gaps remained in regard to key targets and areas. Many countries had no biodiversity observation networks because they lacked capacity, funding and guidance. Patchy, project-based data, heterogeneity and incompatibility of terminology and methods, absence of information systems and human and technological capacities were common problems. However, many countries had made good and innovative progress on biodiversity observation networks, including through regional cooperation, the development of global databases, citizens science, earth observation and the use of essential biodiversity variables. In order to encourage public investment, a stronger case must be made for using biodiversity monitoring data to inform decision-making. In order to support the establishment and maintenance of national biodiversity observation systems, it had been suggested that the Group on Earth Observations should provide regionally-tailored start-up kits (BON-in-a-Box) and strategies to integrate remotely-sensed and in situ data. It could also help provide economic arguments for biodiversity and biodiversity observation systems, advocacy to funders, and capacity building on terminology, methods and standards. The Group’s work plan was already largely in line with those priorities and further adjustments would be made in follow-up to the Workshop. The Group and its partners were keen to engage further, including by identifying ways to meet countries’ needs for specific forms of assistance.