greg wigger chris tedder and melanie gault advised by dr duco jansen ph d n.
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Greg Wigger, Chris Tedder, and Melanie Gault Advised by: Dr. Duco Jansen, Ph.D. Development of an Infrared Nerve Stimulator . The Problem. There is a need for an implantable device that will reliably stimulate individual nerve fascicles.

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Presentation Transcript
the problem
The Problem

There is a need for an implantable device that will reliably stimulate individual nerve fascicles

  • This requires a reliable stimulation modality to gain better control over neural signals.
our solution infrared stim ulation

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Our Solution: Infrared Stimulation

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Electrical

Electrical

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Stimulator

Stimulator

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Infrared Stimulation

Same advantages as electrical stimulation, but:

  • Less damaging to nerve
  • Artifact free
  • Spatially selective

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Rat Sciatic Nerve

Rat Sciatic Nerve

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Fiber Coupled

Fiber Coupled

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Laser

Laser

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Optical Fiber

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CMAP (V)

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Rat Sciatic Nerve

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Electrical Stimulation

Has fundamental shortcomings that create a need for an alternative

Contact can cause permanent damage to nerve

Stimulation artifact

Hard to selectively stimulate

group objective
Group Objective

Develop an infrared nerve stimulator containing optical fibers running parallel to the nerve fibers

  • Create a single fiber prototype that sends infrared signal at 90° angle
  • Three models will be tested

Fiber polished at 45 degree angle

Fiber with flat angled mirror

Fiber with concave angled mirror

the three prototypes
The Three Prototypes
  • Biocompatibility – PEGylation
  • Minimal Power Loss
  • Small Beam Size
  • Energy Density
  • Low Cost
  • Durability

Curved Mirror Prototype

Flat Mirror Prototype

possible future uses
Possible Future Uses
  • Implantable devices for use in victims of paralysis
  • Incorporation of sensors to provide brain with feedback from the external environment
past work
Past Work
  • Completed Solidworks
  • Tested nylon tube for infrared break down
  • Determined beam size, energy density, and power loss of 45°-polished fiber and curved mirror prototype with “Knife-Edge Technique”

Before

After

past work cont data collected
Past Work cont. (Data collected)
  • Energy Density and Beam Area
  • 10-fold difference in energy density and order of magnitude difference in spot area of the beam
past work cont data collected1
Past Work cont. (Data collected)
  • Power Loss
    • Coupling loss measured from the laser to the fiber
      • Faulty lens?
    • Nylon is either scattering or absorbing infrared light as seen in large loss from fiber to nylon
      • Future direction
current work
Current Work
  • Determine if nylon scatters or absorbs light by flattening a piece of nylon and measure loss and spot size
  • Find absorption spectra of nylon
  • Calculations
    • Find theoretical spot size of concave mirror and compare it to actual measured spot size
    • Find maximum distance that the fiber can be from the concave mirror without any light being lost
future work
Future Work
  • Obtain capillary tube (600 µm ID)to determine if glass is more transparent to infrared light than the nylon tubing
    • We will conduct an energy-loss test using the angle-polished fiber
  • Determine the actual distance at which the curved mirror focuses
    • Place 100 µm pinholes over power meter
future work cont
Future Work cont.
  • Still waiting on our flat mirrors to arrive…
  • Optimistic about about its feasibility and effectiveness:
    • Unnecessary to polish the fiber, as with angle-polished model
    • Convergence/divergence are non-issues, as with concave model