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STAAR-Light * STAAR WRITE
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  1. STAAR-Light * STAAR WRITE Choose the slides you need! Expository, Personal Narrative, Literary and Persuasive Essays Kaye Price-Hawkins Priceless Literacy www.pricelessliteracy.homestead.com kayepricehawkins@aol.com

  2. Expository Text • Purpose: • Explain* • Inform • In sample prompts, the key word will be “explain” or “explaining” so this is your hint to tell different things about (explain why) this person or topic. • May be told in 1st • person about some- • thing or someone • OR may be told in • 3rd person. • Read the prompt for appropriate POV. • Be sure you don’t drift • into a narrative…

  3. Mentor Text for Discovery • Read a piece of expository text. • Use the foldable (next slide) to examine the text for author’s craft: • Development and Support • Language/Diction • Features

  4. Description Comparison/ Contrast Cause/Effect Problem/ Solution Sequence* HEADING FOR THE PAPER Description Problem/Solution Thesis Comparison/Cause/Effect Contrast Foldable for Analysis of Support in an Expository Essay Problem And Solution * Put Sequence on the back; Note the transitional words/phrases.

  5. Out of this World Plan-it Pack-It for Expository

  6. Capitalization U sage P unctuation S pelling S entences Left side of the folder: sentence strip OS4e Remember: (organizational structure (Glue in the DEVELOP for expository) box.) • Inside—left flap of strip: Introduction • “Hook” the reader with a lead. • Include a controlling idea/thesis sentence. • Inside—center of the strip: Body • Well-developed ideas connected with appropriate transitions • Well-chosen details: description, cause and effect, comparison and contrast, problem/solution –focused • Inside—right flap of strip: Conclusion • Leave the reader with something to think about. • Refer to beginning, not repeated word for word, but connected.

  7. Reading Questions • Types of questions • Inference • Text specific (features, purpose) • Evidence based • Author’s craft (word choice, literary devices, vocabulary) • Summary (glue on this strip to envelope)

  8. Inside right flap—top STAAR Rubric (Scoring App) Each grade level tested will have an appropriate rubric which you may want to “reword” with your students so that the rubric reflects what the STAAR is saying but morphed into kid-friendly language. • Organization/Progression • Development of Ideas • Use of Language/Conventions

  9. PERSONAL NARRATIVE • Purpose • Share an event that happened (or could happen) in your life • Maintain focus on that one event. Include: • Feelings • Action • Interaction with others • Importance of that event

  10. What do we do about the picture in the prompt? S- What do you see in this picture? H- How does this represent other important times or people in your life? O- What is one event in your life that could relate to the topic in the prompt? W-What impact does this event have on you and the person you are today? What did you learn? What feelings come to the surface when you think of this event?

  11. Mentor Text for Discovery • Read a personal narrative with the students. • Examine the text by looking at the author’s craft • Development and Support (Snapshots) • Language/Diction (Word choice) • Believability and focus • Dialogue (direct/indirect) & Thoughtshots

  12. Foldable for Analysis of Support: Personal Narrative and Literary Essay Problem And Solution HEADING FOR THE PAPER Snapshots/Support Dialogue (internal & Development between characters) Theme Focus symbolLanguage/Diction Event/Character Literary Elements • Development and Support (Snapshots) • Language/Diction (Word choice) • Focus (character, event) • Dialogue • Direct—between characters • Internal—thoughts or asides (Thoughtshots) Note the transitional words/phrases for each category. Use the back for additional information.

  13. Out of this World Plan-It Pack-It for Personal Narrative

  14. C apitalization U sage P unctuation S pelling S entences ESPN Remember:(Efficient Structure-Personal Narrative) Left side of the folder: sentence strip *Must be realistic *Use first person *Include sensory language • Inside—left flap of the strip: Beginning • Lead that captures the reader’s attention • Includes the focus of the prompt with writer’s spin… • Inside—center of the strip: Middle • One event well-developed: • SNAPSHOTS, TALKSHOTS (DIALOGUE), THOUGHTSHOTS – Word choice!!! • Sensory language – Actions and Reactions and Motivations • www@ww.how/bme/ps (summary website) • Inside—right flap of the strip: End • Ba (reflection on impact of the event—emotions-feelings) • Duh! (lesson learned – Why is it important?) • BOOM! (hope, wish, dream for future as a result of this event)

  15. STAAR Personal Narrative • Personal Narratives have a beginning, middle, end format and must be believable and realistic. • The Summary Website includes the essentials: www@ww.how/bme/ps who did what and why @ where and when. how (feelings & sequence)/beginning, middle, end/problem solution.

  16. Idea development for literary and personal narrative: • SNAPSHOTS – Details, description (“Explode the moment.”) • DIALOGUE—Strategicallyused in personal narratives • THOUGHTSHOTS—excellent color commentary (asides/mutterings) • From Barry Lane’s AFTER THE END talking thoughts

  17. Reading Questions • Types of questions • Inference • Text specific (features, purpose) • Evidence based • Author’s craft (word choice, literary devices, vocabulary) • Summary (glue on this strip to envelope)

  18. Inside right flap—top STAAR Rubric (Scoreboard) Each grade level tested will have an appropriate rubric which you may want to “reword” with your students so that the rubric reflects what the STAAR is saying but morphed into kid-friendly language. • Organization/Progression • Development of Ideas • Use of Language/Conventions

  19. LITERARY WRITING Literary texts will: • Express ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. • Create an engaging real or fictional story with • a well-developed conflict and resolution • interesting and believable characters • a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense) and devices to enhance the plot

  20. What do we do about the picture in the prompt? SEE S- What do you see in this picture? Use this as as a springboard to the prompt. E- Effectively connect to the prompt and plan a short story that fits the focus. E- Create a story about one EVENT that could relate to the topic.

  21. Mentor Text for Discovery • Read a short literary piece. • Examine the text by looking at the author’s craft for literary text • Notice how the plotline develops:

  22. Out of this World Plan-It Pack-It for Literary

  23. Left side of the folder: sentence strip Inside the sentence strip

  24. Inside right flap—top STAAR Rubric (Critic’s Corner) Each grade level tested will have an appropriate rubric which you may want to “reword” with your students so that the rubric reflects what the STAAR is saying but morphed into kid-friendly language. • Organization/Progression • Development of Ideas • Use of Language/Conventions

  25. Persuasive WRITING: • Persuasive texts include: • A position on a narrow topic • An exploration of both sides of the issue • Strong evidence for the side you choose • Facts and relevant examples • Logical reasoning • Testimonials from believable experts • Convincing language

  26. Mentor Text for Discovery • Read a piece of persuasive text with the students. • Examine the text by looking at the author’s craft, development and support • Convincing language (argument/transitions) • Facts and relevant examples • Quotations/believable experts • Logical reasoning

  27. Foldable for Analysis of Support in a Persuasive Essay Problem And Solution HEADING FOR THE PAPER Facts/Relevant Quotations/Believable examples experts (Ethos) Topic/Position Logical for or againstConvincing Reasoning language (Logos) (Pathos) • Facts/relevant examples • Quotations/ believable experts • Logical reasoning • Convincing language Note the transitional words/phrases for each category. Other support and questions may be placed in the boxes on the back.

  28. Out of this World Plan-It Pack-It for Persuasive

  29. C apitalization U sage P unctuation S pelling S entences APPEAL Remember:A Perfect Persuasive Essay--At Last! * word choice* transitions to connect and lead to arguments or “proof” * convincing language • Inside Left: INTRODUCTION • Opening statement – Hook your reader • Thesis statement (what you are going to prove) • Inside Center: BODY • Ideas and support of your thesis: • Specific, strong, relevant examples • Topic-specific evidence tightly linked (transitions) • Contrast your point of view with the opposition—(strawman) • Inside Right: CONCLUSION • Closing argument • Restate (not word for word) main point & powerful evidence • Remind your reader why this is the “right” position

  30. Inside right flap—topSTAAR Rubric(Jury’s Verdict: The Sentencing!) Each grade level tested will have an appropriate rubric which you may want to “reword” with your students so that the rubric reflects what the STAAR is saying but morphed into kid-friendly language. • Organization/Progression • Development of Ideas • Use of Language/Conventions

  31. SCORING—for all writing:TAKS compositions -- “perfect agreement” model. Two readers, if the scores did not agree, a third reader (and sometimes a fourth) read the paper to determine the final score.STAAR compositions -- “adjacent scoring” model. Perfect agreement does not have to be reached. Districts receive a more accurate description of each student’s writing performance. Score 1 Score 2 Score Total CSR Rating

  32. Test-taking Strategies—for all! • Circle the “write” statement and underline important key words. • Use space for planning the essay • Graphic organizer that works • Decide on direction and focus of the paper • Rough Draft, keeping in mind the time limit and the length • Introduction (one to three sentences) • Main focus (with details—well-developed section of the paper—may be one or two paragraphs) • Conclusion (one to three sentences)