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The Geodatabase. Geodatabase Fundamentals. Spatial data formats Geodatabase data structure Personal vs. enterprise geodatabase Components of geodatabase Building geodatabase. Geographic Feature Data Formats.

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the geodatabase
The Geodatabase

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geodatabase fundamentals
Geodatabase Fundamentals
  • Spatial data formats
  • Geodatabase data structure
  • Personal vs. enterprise geodatabase
  • Components of geodatabase
  • Building geodatabase

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geographic feature data formats
Geographic Feature Data Formats
  • Formats are based on representations (models) of the real world that can be placed in a GIS to produce maps, perform interactive queries, and execute analyses.
    • CAD – first computer mapping model/format.
      • Binary file format with little attribute information.
    • Coverage – native ArcInfo 7 format.
      • Based on Georelational data model.
      • Vector data is maintained in indexed binary files and partitioned from, but linked to attribute tables by a common identifier.
      • Topological relationships are maintained.
      • Shortcomings – features aggregated into collections of points, lines & polygons with generic behavior. The behavior of a line representing a road is the same as the behavior of a line representing a stream.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geographic feature data formats4
Geographic Feature Data Formats
  • Shapefile – introduced with ArcView
    • Also georelational data model – nontopological vector data format.
    • Very prolific format – much GIS data in Shapefile format.
    • Simpler than coverage because they do not store topological associations among different features and feature classes.
    • Limited analysis capabilities due to lack of topology
  • Geodatabase – introduced in ArcInfo 8.
    • Object-oriented model – can characterize features more naturally by defining object types, topological, spatial and general relationships, and interactions.
    • Geodatabase features can be stored in a single database.
    • Create custom features in addition to points, lines, polygons
    • Brings physical model closer to logical model.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

supported data types
Supported Data Types
  • ArcInfo 8 supports four representations of geographic data.
    • Vector data for representing features.
    • Raster data for images, grids, and surfaces.
    • Triangulated irregular networks (TINS) for surfaces.
    • Tabular data.
      • Locators and addresses for finding a geographic position from an address.
      • Locators apply national postal conventions to convert an address to a position.
    • Note: in AI8.1, geodatabases do NOT store TINS. They must be kept in coverage workspaces.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

what is a geodatabase
What is a Geodatabase?
  • A new type of geographic data format (GDF) for ArcInfo 8.
  • Based on Object-Oriented Model
  • Users can add behavior, properties, rules and relationships to data
  • Implemented as extension to standard relational database technology
  • Supports topologically integrated feature classes
  • Extends the coverage model with support for complex networks, relationships among feature classes, and other object-oriented features
  • Provides platform for development of custom data models using visual tools like CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering) tools and UML (Unified Modeling Language) notation

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

arccatalog is the principal user interface used to define and manage the geodatabase

ArcCatalog Is the Principal User Interface Used to Define and Manage the Geodatabase

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geodatabase framework

ArcCatalog

ArcMap

Geodatabase Framework

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

personal single user geodatabase
Personal (single-user) Geodatabase
  • Personal Geodatabase.
    • Implemented as a Microsoft Access database (*.mdb file) by using MS jet engine which is installed with AI8. MS access is not needed.
    • Can be placed on local or network drives.
    • Generally used for personal or small work-group use.
    • Can handle small to moderately sized datasets.
    • Personal geodatabase can yield decent performance for datasets of 250,000 objects or less, maximum size is 2.0 GB
    • Full functionality of geodatabase served through ArcSDE except versioning.
      • Versioning – allows many editors to work concurrently and includes framework to resolve edit conflicts.
    • If a personal geodatabase is deleted its gone.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

enterprise multi user geodatabase
Enterprise (Multi-user) Geodatabase
  • ArcSDE Geodatabase
    • ArcSDE is the multi-user data access extension to ArcInfo (bundled w/software) that serves geodatabases to AI applications running on pc’s on TCP/IP network.
    • Used for demanding datasets requiring concurrent editing by multiple users.
    • Created by installing a DBMS and ArcSDE on a server.
    • ArcCatalog only creates and deletes connections to ArcSDE geodatabases.
    • Can be deployed on UNIX or Windows NT.
      • Many use UNIX platform for ArcSDE and DBMS and NT for AI applications
    • ArcSDE is centrally tuned and managed by a DBA.
    • Can build SQL applications to access tables in a remote geodatabase.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geodatabase elements
Geodatabase Elements
  • Objects & Object classes
  • Features & Feature classes
  • Feature datasets
  • Spatial references
  • Domains
  • Subtypes
  • Relationships & Relationship classes
  • Geometric networks
  • Labels and Annotation

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

objects object classes
Objects & Object Classes
  • Geodatabases organize geographic data into a hierarchy of data objects.
  • Objects are instances of an object class that have properties and behavior.
  • Objects can be related to other objects via relationships
  • Objects have unique system identifiers (OID)
  • Object classes are tables in a geodatabase storing non-spatial data (e.g., Parcel owners)
  • Objects in an object class have the same
    • Properties - stored in the table as attributes
    • Behavior - implemented as a component

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

object classes tables
Object Classes (tables)

A row stores an Object

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

features and feature classes
Features and Feature Classes
  • Features are objects with required shape (Points, Multi-points, Lines & Polygons) that represent a real world object in a layer on a map.
  • Features classes are collections of features with same type of feature geometry and attributes.
  • A feature class is also an object class which stores spatial objects (features) (e.g., Parcels).
  • All the features in a feature class are in the same spatial reference.
  • Feature classes which store topological features must be contained within a feature dataset to ensure a common spatial reference.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

feature classes
Feature Classes

Feature Class Table

A row stores feature

BLOB: Binary Large Object Block

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

feature datasets
Feature Datasets
  • Containers for feature classes
  • Shared spatial reference
  • Analogous to a coverage
    • less restrictive
  • May also contain
    • relationship classes
    • geometric networks
    • Annotations

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

building a geodatabase
Building a Geodatabase

Design

geodatabase

  • Building a geodatabase
    • Designing the geodatabase
      • (Think before your create)
    • Creating a new geodatabase
      • (Name and location only)
    • Defining the geodatabase structure
      • (Schema and data)
    • Entering spatial data
      • (Loading or automation)
    • Define additional properties
      • (Validataion, relationships, networks)

Create a new

geodatabase

Defining GDB

structure

Geodatabase

Entering spatial

data

Define additional

properties

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

designing a geodatabase
Designing a Geodatabase
  • Conceptual Plan: Current and future needs
    • Data contents
    • Coordinate system
    • Data validation and modification rules
    • Relationships among objects
    • Custom objects
  • Logical Design
    • Can use CASE tools
      • What needs to store (Not how to store)
      • UML Use Case
        • Microsoft Visio Enterprise Edition

Microsoft Visio Enterprise Version

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

creating a new geodatabase
Creating a New Geodatabase
  • Create a new geodatabase using ArcCatalog
    • Create new
    • Rename default name

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

defining geodatabase structure
Defining Geodatabase Structure
  • Create from scratch manually.
    • Use tools in ArcCatalog to create schema
  • Importing existing database schema
    • Can convert by importing schema from existing datasets
  • Use CASE tools and UML to automate database creation.
    • Can use CASE tools to create new custom objects and/or generate a geodatabase schema from UML
      • CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering)
      • UML (Unified Modeling Language)

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

create schema from scratch manually
Create schema from scratch manually
  • Define structure using ArcCatalog
    • Feature datasets
    • Feature classes
    • Tables
    • Relationship classes
  • What to Define?
    • Database name
    • Field name and properties
    • Spatial reference
    • Table relationship parameters

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

importing existing database schema
Importing existing database schema
  • Import data and/or database schema
    • Shape files, coverage, features class
    • INFO, dBase tables
  • Options while importing
    • Rename object
    • Rename or exclude attribute columns
    • Modify spatial reference
    • Insert feature class into feature dataset

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

use case tools and uml to define database structure
Use CASE tools and UML to define database structure
  • Physical Design using UML
    • Feature class, relationship class, subtype and/or domain schema
    • Design large database with visualization and documentation of data relationship and attributes
  • Edit ESRI Object Model diagram
    • Create customize objects inherited from ESRI objects (ArcObjects)
    • Export structure to Microsoft Repository, then to ArcCatalog
      • Visual Basic with GIS Applications (Visual Basic + MapObjects), Substitute Computer Techniques
      • GIS Application Software Development (ArcObjects + UML)

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

entering spatial data
Entering Spatial Data
  • Spatial data automation options
    • Analog data: digitizing or scanning
    • Arc/Info formats: importing and loading
    • Other digital data: data conversion
  • Data Mapping
    • Vector geometry types (p. 81)
      • X, Y: Points, multipoints, lines, polygons
      • Z: Optional position in Z (e.g. elevation)
      • M: Optional linear measurement (e.g. milepost)
    • Field mapping (p. 82)
  • Spatial Reference

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

importing vs loading
Importing Vs. Loading
  • Importing
    • Creates new features within a new feature class or geodatabase table.
      • The features class or table cannot exist before importing
    • Database schema is imported at the same time
  • Loading
    • Appends features into an existing feature class.
    • Existing feature class have the same schema with the data sources
      • Simple Data Loader (ArcCatalog)
      • Object Loader Wizard (ArcMap)

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

defining additional database properties
Defining additional database properties
  • Leveraging geodatabase advantages
    • Add validation rules: subtype and domain
    • Define relationships between tables
    • Create topological structure (Geometric network)
    • Create annotation

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

spatial reference
Spatial Reference
  • Spatial Reference
    • Coordinate system
    • Spatial domain
    • Precision
  • Cautions
    • All feature classes within a feature dataset share the same spatial reference.
    • Once created, the spatial domain for feature dataset/class cannot be changed.
    • Data outside extent of dataset need to be created in a new feature dataset or standalone feature class.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

coordinate system
Coordinate system
  • Projection system & parameters
    • Geographic, UTM and State plane
    • Datum, central Meridian, standard parallels, false northing and easting
  • Define Coordinate system for feature dataset/classes
    • Select: a predefined coordinate system
    • Import: from existing geodatabase
    • Create: a new coordinate system
    • Modify: current coordinate system
    • Save: for future use

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

spatial domain
Spatial Domain
  • Spatial Domain
    • The allowable coordinate range for the geographic coordinates
    • X/Y Domain:
      • MinX, MaxX, MinY, MaxY
    • Z Domain:
      • Min, Max
    • M Domain:
      • Min, Max

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

precision
Precision
  • Precision
    • The number of system units per one unit of measure (of distance). Precision determines the resolution of a map (geodatabase)
    • For example: map unit is meter
      • Precision of 1: 1 system unit = 1 meter (resolution)
      • Precision of 1000: 1000 systems units = 1 meter
        • 1 systems unit = 0.001 meter = 1 millimeter (resolution)
    • E.g. Map unit feet, Precision of 12, Resolution?

12 system units = 1 foot

1 system unit = 1/12 foot = 1 inch (resolution)

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

determine precision based on map resolution
Determine Precision Based on Map Resolution
  • Formula:
    • Resolution = Map unit / precision
    • Precision = Map unit / resolution
  • Determine precision of a new geodatabase
    • Digitizing table resolution is 0.002 inches, map scales is 1:10,000, map unit is meter

Geodatabase resolution = 0.002 inches * 10,000 = 20 inches

20 inches = 20 /39.37 meters = .508 meter ~ 0.5 meter

Precision = 1 meter / 0.5 meter = 2

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geodatabase storage and precision
Geodatabase Storage and Precision

Map units (Use)

Floating Point

123.456 (m)

  • Coverage/Shapefile storage:
    • Single floating point precision (6-7 digits)
    • Double floating point precision (13-14 digits)
  • Geodatabase storage
    • As Integer: 4 byte integer
    • Stores 2.14 billion system units
      • max = 2,147,483,648
  • Coordinate are
    • Multiplied by precision when stored
    • Divided by precision when used

Multiply by precision

123.456*1000

Divide by precision

123,456/1000

System units (Store)

Integer

123,456

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

check geodatabase precision with range

4 billion

200,000,000 mm x

3,750,000,000 mm y

2 billion

2 billion

Check Geodatabase Precision with Range
  • Range in Map Unit (RangeMU)
    • Larger of width or height
      • Width = MaxX –MinX
      • Height= MaxY – MinY
    • Example
      • 1,000,000 – 200,000 = 800,000 (Width)  RangeMU
      • 4,060,000 – 3,750,000 = 310,000 (Height)
  • Range in system unit (RangeSU)
    • RangeSU = RangeMU * Precision
    • RangeSU = 800,000 * 1000 = 800,000,000 < 2.14 billion
  • Is OK to accept 1000 as precision?

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

re center coordinates using shift
Re-center Coordinates using shift
  • Problem:
    • At desire precision, data is outside extent
  • Solution
    • Shift the center of geodatabase space to the center of the data
    • Shift = the difference between the center of your data and GDBCenterMU
  • Formula:
    • Center of geodatabase space in map units (GDBCenterMU)
      • (2,147,483,648/2)/precision = (2,147,483,648/2)/1000=1,073,741.824
    • Center of your data
      • (DataMinX + DataMaxX)/2 and (DataMinY + DataMaxY)/2
    • Shift
      • ShiftX = (DataMinX + DataMaxX)/2 – GDBCenterMU
      • ShiftY= (DataMinY + DataMaxY)/2 – GDBCenterMU
    • Update (MinX, MinY) with (ShiftX, ShiftY)

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geodatabase storage and shift

4 billion

200,000,000 mm x

3,750,000,000 mm y

2 billion

2 billion

Geodatabase Storage and Shift

Map units (Use)

Floating Point

3,000,000.456 (m)

  • The geodatabase will
    • Subtract shift, then multiply coordinate by precision when stored
    • Divide coordinates by precision, then add shift when used

Add shift

1,000,000.456 + 2,000,000

Subtract shift

(3,000,000.456 – 2,000,000)

Multiply by precision

1,000,000.456*1000

Divide by precision

1,000,000,456/1000

System units (Store)

Integer

1,000,000,456

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

subtype and attribute domain
Subtype and Attribute Domain
  • Subtype
  • Attribute domain
    • Rang domain
    • Coded value domain
  • Associating domain with subtype
  • Attribute validation rules
    • Split and merge domain policies

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

why subtypes and attribute domains
Why Subtypes and Attribute Domains
  • Data Integrity
    • Prevent illegal attribute assignment to features, tables with out-of-range data values
    • For certain critical field, provide predefined codes as the only valid values
  • Data Efficiency
    • Associate different subset of a feature class with different default values, attribute validation rules
    • Allow efficient choice from a set of valid value descriptions rather than manually input the value itself

PowerPoles

Streets

Wood

Steel

Primary

Secondary

20-30

30-50

ST, RD,

AV, BLVD

Ln, Cir,

Pl

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

subtype
Subtype
  • Subtype
    • Feature class’ “subclasses” that allow you to further distinguish objects without creating new feature classes
    • Logical groups of a subset of records within a feature class based on single column’s values
    • Same subtype has similar attribute values and behaviors
  • Create Subtype
    • Can choose default subtype
    • Require integer values (long/short), user adds descriptions
    • Can have different default values and domains for each field to improve data efficiency

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

creating subtypes
Creating Subtypes

1

  • Define subtypes using ArcCatalog
    • For feature class or table properties
    • Select column to create subtype
    • Enter subtype code and description
    • Enter default values and domains for each subtype
    • Set default subtype

4

2

3

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

display and edit subtypes in arcmap
Display and Edit Subtypes in ArcMap
  • Displaying
    • Subtype can have unique classification
    • Subtype descriptions are listed in TOC
    • Symbols can be modified as desired
  • Adding new features
    • Use Editor Target list to add feature with chosen subtype
  • Editing existing features/records
    • Can apply subtype after data entry
    • Subtype fields shows description, not code
    • Changing the subtype updates the default values for other fields

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

domain
Domain
  • Define a set of legal values for a field’s attributes
    • Range: specifies a valid range of values for a numerical attributes
      • A water pipe must be between 1 and 100 inches wide
    • Coded value: specifies a valid set of values for an attributes. Can apply to any type of attributes
      • Parcels can only have RES or VAC land use values
  • Validation methods
    • Pulldown list of descriptions (coded values) prevents error
    • Validation during edit session prevents range error
  • A geodatabase property
    • Can apply to entire field or individual field subtype
    • Multiple objects in the same database may use the same domain
    • Cannot edit domain referenced by another subtype

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

creating range domains
Creating Range Domains
  • Click on existing or blank domain
  • Enter the name and description for the domain
  • Enter the domain prosperities
    • Field type
    • Domain type: Range
    • Minimum value
    • Maximum value
    • Split policy
    • Merge policy

1

2

3

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

creating coded value domains
Creating Coded Value Domains
  • Click on existing or blank domain
  • Enter the name and description for the domain
  • Enter the domain prosperities
    • Field type
    • Domain type: Coded Values
    • Split policy
    • Merge policy
  • Enter the coded values
    • Code
    • Description

1

2

3

4

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

associating domains to entire fields
Associating domains to entire fields
  • Provide validation for records within a specified field
    • Domain must be defined as same field type

Diameter_L is float

Only float domain appear

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

associating domains to subtype
Associating domains to subtype
  • Provide validation for records within subtype
    • Domain must be defined as same field type

Subtype field grouped

into four codes

Each code has its own domain

for other attributes

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

editing records that have coded value domains
Editing records that have coded value domains
  • ArcMap only shows valid domain description
    • View codes in table by changing the appearance of the table

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editing records that have range domains
Editing records that have range domains
  • Perform edit in ArcMap
  • Validate selection verifies fields with a range domain
    • Invalid features remain selected

Angle has a range

domain of 0 -359

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

split domain policies
Split Domain policies
  • Split policies on edited feature’s attribute

default

value

geometric

ratio

duplicate

Split Policy

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

merge domain policies
Merge Domain policies
  • Merge policies on edited feature’s attribute

Merge Policy

default

value

sum

values

weighted

average

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

table association and table join
Table Association and Table Join
  • Table association
    • Attributes about a feature can be stored
      • Feature class table (Feature class)
      • Separate table (Object class)
    • Associate tables with common column (key) values
      • Primary keys: Common field on original table
      • Foreign keys: Common field on destination table
  • Table join
    • Merge two tables together into one table logically or physically (in ArcMap).

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

relationship and relationship class
Relationship and Relationship Class
  • Relationship
    • Persistent and Dynamic association between objects in the geodatabase
      • Change to origin table can been seen when the destination access the relationship.
      • The relationship exist unless deleted. No merging of two tables
    • Common field with same data type
      • Between non-spatial objects (rows in tables)
      • Between spatial objects (features in feature classes)
      • Between spatial and non-spatial objects
    • Non relationship based on BLOB fields
      • No relationship based on location
  • Relationship class
    • A geodatabase relationship is stored in relationship classes. It is save as a record (row) in a relationship table.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

geodatabase relationship
Geodatabase Relationship
  • Characteristics of relationship
    • Persisted relationship in the geodatabase
    • Can enforce dependent behavior
    • Can edit, query, and symbolized across relationship
    • Can only relate tables within the same geodatabase
    • Do not support access to stacked relationships
      • If A  B, BC; then A can not access C unless AC

Origin

Destination

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creating relationship classes
Creating Relationship Classes
  • Relationship properties
    • Relationship name
    • Origin and destination tables
    • Relationship type
      • Simple or composite
    • From-to, to-from labels
    • Messagingdirection
    • Cardinality (1-1, 1-M, M-N)
    • Foreign key, primary key

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

table relationship cardinality
Table Relationship Cardinality
  • Cardinality
    • Defines how many A objects are related to B objects
    • Influence relationship properties and uses
      • 1-1 (one-to-one)
      • 1-M (one-to-many)
      • M-N (many to many)

Many parcels

have many owners

One parcel

has one owner

One parcel

has many owners

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

relationship type
Relationship Type
  • Simple
    • Peer-to-peer relationship that are between two or more objects that exist independently of each other
    • Delete origin objects, related objects in destinations table continuous to exist – FK value is deleted
    • Can have one-to-one, one-to-may, or many-to-many cardinality
  • Composite
    • The life time of one object controls the lifetime of its related objects
    • Destination objects cannot exist without origin object
    • Can only have one-to-one, and one-to-many cardinality.

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

keys path labels and messaging notification
Keys, Path Labels and Messaging Notification
  • From origin to destination based on common field
    • Primary Key (PK): On origin (Parcels)
    • Foreign Key (FK): On destination (Owners)
  • Path labels
    • Forward (From-to): To navigate the relationship from the origin table to the destination table. (E.g. Is owned by)
    • Backward (To-from): To navigate the relationship from the destination table to the origin table. (E.g. owns)
  • Messaging Notification
    • Direction to propagate standard message between related objects
    • Used to trigger behavior (e.g. cascade move, custom)
      • Origin to destination, destination to origin, both, none

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

relationship rules and validation
Relationship Rules and Validation
  • Property set after creating the relationship class
    • Controls which object subtypes from origin class can be related to which object subtypes in destination class
    • Also the valid cardinality range for all permissible subtype pairs.
      • Cardinality (1-1, M-1, M-n) does determine or control the actual quantity (and types) of related records
  • Validate Selection check for attribute violation
    • After validation, all invalid records remain selected

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

open related table in arcmap
Open Related Table in ArcMap
  • Add origin table, destination table, or both
    • Table appears in Table of Contents Source tab
  • Open table
  • Use Options > Related Tables

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

querying related tables
Querying related tables
  • Query records from first table using Option> Select Attribute…
  • Click Options>Relationship> Path Label name to refresh related table
  • Selected records highlighted in related table, regardless of messaging

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

symbolizing and labeling with related fields
Symbolizing and labeling with related fields
  • Properties Fields tabRelated Fields

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

displaying and editing related records
Displaying and editing related records
  • Classification based related fields appears in the Table of contents
  • Fields in related table appear in Attribute dialog

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs

reading
Reading
  • MacDonald, Chapter 1, 3, 4, 5
  • Zeiler, Chapter 1-5

GISC 6382 Applied GIS UT-Dallas Briggs