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PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION PowerPoint Presentation
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PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

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PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

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  1. PRESENTATION TO THE PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION 27 October 2010

  2. OVERVIEW OF PRESENTATION • This presentation contains brief summaries of the following reports of the Public Service Commission (PSC): • Consolidated report on Inspections of Service Delivery Sites: South African Police Service • An Evaluation of Integration and Coordination in the Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Programme • Assessment of the state of human resource management in the public service • Report on the effectiveness of public service leadership in the promotion of intergovernmental relations • Report on the implementation of the Performance Management and Development System for Senior Managers in the Limpopo Province • Overview of Financial Misconduct for the 2008/09 financial year 2

  3. CONSOLIDATED REPORT ON INSPECTIONS OF SERVICE DELIVERY SITES: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE 3

  4. INSPECTIONS IN SAPS • FINDINGS • ANNOUNCED INSPECTIONS • Focused on readiness of the SAPS and Police Stations to support the 2010 Soccer World Cup (SWC) 4

  5. INSPECTIONS IN SAPS • FINDINGS (cont) 5

  6. INSPECTIONS IN SAPS • FINDINGS (cont) • UNANNOUNCED INSPECTIONS • Focused on the implementation and compliance of Police Stations with Batho Pele Framework. 6

  7. INSPECTIONS IN SAPS • FINDINGS (cont) 7

  8. INSPECTIONS IN SAPS • RECOMMENDATIONS • ANNOUNCED INSPECTIONS • The relevant sections of the SAPS 2010 SWC Integrated Strategy and operational plan should be discussed with officials at the SWC designated Police Stations for the effective implementation thereof. • The National and Provincial Head Offices of SAPS should ensure that before 2010, all 2010 SWC designated Police Stations have adequate personnel, vehicles and other required equipments, which will be used to handle the demands of the 2010 Soccer World Cup. • UNANNOUNCED INSPECTIONS • Police Stations should be encouraged to display prior requirements that are needed before clients can access service, business hours and list of services rendered. • The SAPS National and Provincial Head Offices should assist Police Stations in developing service delivery charters. Once developed service delivery charters should be translated into local languages and be displayed where they are easily visible for members of the public. • Complaints registers/ suggestion boxes should be displayed and complaint handling process should be visibly displayed.

  9. AN EVALUATION OF INTEGRATION AND COORDINATION IN THE INTEGRATED SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME 9

  10. Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Programme • INTRODUCTION • The Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Programme (ISRDP) was unique in that – • it did not have its own budget (except for a small programme staff) • it was built on the idea of coordination of other programmes. Its premise was that if existing programmes in the districts are implemented in a coordinated and integrated manner, their combined effect will be bigger. • This still largely applies to the new Comprehensive Rural Development Programme and the lessons from the ISRDP study are, therefore, still relevant. • The objectives of the study were to evaluate the integration and coordination processes that were set in place in support of the ISRDP. 10

  11. Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Programme • FINDINGS OF THE STUDY • Coordination mechanisms introduced by the ISRDP were overly simplistic • To build a whole programme intervention on the abstract notion of coordination and integration was ambitious. Whereas the intervention mechanisms of other poverty reduction programmes are concrete (building a house, transferring land, creating a job), that of the ISRDP were abstract and the implementers did not understand it. • The Interdepartmental Task Teams were not coordination or planning forums but information sharing and reporting channels. • No real planning decisions, like approval of objectives, programmes, projects, or budgets were taken there. • It therefore had limited influence as a coordinating mechanism. • Stakeholders found it difficult to understand the value added by the ISRDP. • It was also seen to be a duplication of the existing IGR and IDP processes within government.

  12. Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Programme • RECOMMENDATIONS • The report argues that the devolution of development planning to the local government level is nesessary, as is already happening with regard to housing and water services. • In the absence of full devolution and based on the belief that coordination should be facilitated by appropriately empowered local actors from both local government and the district level units of sector departments, the PSC recommends the following measures: • National and provincial departments should increasingly create integrated units at the district level. • Heads of such units should be empowered to, in cooperation with local government actors, develop district development plans. • Policies and guidelines should be flexible enough to allow adjustment to local conditions and preferences. • Budgets should, in addition to being broken down into programmers and subprogrammes (and further subdivisions), also be split spatially (according to district) so that local sector managers will know what budgets can be committed to district development plans. 12

  13. ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE 13

  14. STATE OF HR • INTRODUCTION • The manner in which the Public Service manages its human resources is critical factor if government is to deliver on its mandate. • The Public Service has introduced a number of HR policies aimed at transforming the management of Human Resource to be strategic in its approach. • Over the years, the PSC has conducted a number of studies aimed at both achieving the above, and also addressing gaps identified in ensuring that the desired results are achieved. • In November 2009, the PSC published a report on the “State of HR in the Public Service”, which provided a more holistic assessment of HRM. 14

  15. STATE OF HR • FINDINGS • HUMAN RESOURCES ORGANISATIONAL STRATEGY AND PLANNING • Concerns about inadequate OD skills and poor organisational design at departmental level. • E.g. The development of organisational structures tends to focus on creation of posts and not on job functions and purpose • These weaknesses have led to departments not having proper structures that are supported by sufficient human resources • While provision has been made for delegations to Accounting Officers, such delegations are not always done • Despite policies on AA and EE being implemented, the employment of people with disabilities and the integration of women in the workplace remain a challenge • Representivity • Female representivity at SMS level: 35% • Disability: 0,22% 15

  16. STATE OF HR • FINDINGS (cont) • HUMAN RESOURCE PRACTICES • There was disregard of elementary processes such as compiling job descriptions, conducting job evaluations and obtaining approval of job adverts prior to their placement in the media, all of which undermine the credibility of the selection process and open the Public Service up to legal challenges • A framework for the recruitment of scarce skills is in place, but the development and retention of priority skills still requires urgent attention • HUMAN RESOURCE UTILISATION AND DEVELOPMENT • The overall implementation of the PMDS for the SMS has also been found to be unsatisfactory. These weaknesses are also prevalent at the level of HoDs • As at 26 Feb 2010, only 65% of PAs of HoDs were filed with the PSC • As at 31 March 2010, only 51% of qualifying HoDs had been evaluated for 2008/9 16

  17. STATE OF HR • FINDINGS (cont) • EMPLOYEE HEALTH AND WELLNESS • EHW deals with the development and implementation of effective programmes that are aimed at enhancing the quality of work-life within departments • There was a lack of commitment from senior managers in implementing EWH programmes • The progress made by GEMS in terms of the enrolment of public servants is encouraging • EMPLOYEE RELATIONS • Despite being highly unionised, and with the exception of the 2007 & 2010 strikes, the Public Service has generally enjoyed relative labour peace during the last few years • However, needs an honest reflection on what led to the strikes and how they were handled • Other challenges regarding employee relations include the management of discipline and grievances 17

  18. STATE OF HR • RECOMMENDATIONS • HUMAN RESOURCES ORGANISATIONAL STRATEGY AND PLANNING • DPSA should conduct a follow-up assessment to establish whether there has been an improvement on organisational designs since the introduction of the Guide and Toolkit on Organisational Design. • SMS members must be evaluated on whether they are meeting EE targets in their components. • HUMAN RESOURCE PRACTICES • Departments should develop detailed and clear recruitment and selection policies. • Job hopping should be restricted by introducing regulatory measures relating to promotions. • EMPLOYEE HEALTH AND WELLNESS • Management should provide support by providing funding and staff to implement and maintain EHW programmes. • EMPLOYEE RELATIONS • Departments must also improve the appropriateness and consistency of sanctions given in cases of misconduct 18

  19. REPORT ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PUBLIC SERVICE LEADERSHIP IN THE PROMOTION OF INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS 19

  20. PS LEADERSHIP IN THE PROMOTION OF INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS • INTRODUCTION • Effective Public Service Leadership (PSL) plays a pivotal role in the promotion of intergovernmental relations (IGR). • In the absence of this effective leadership, government institutions are likely to continue working in silos, regardless of the enabling frameworks that have been put in place. • The PSC decided to assess the role played by Public Service leadership in promoting IGR in the three spheres of government through planning and coordination of the development of the public transport infrastructure necessary for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. 20

  21. PS LEADERSHIP IN THE PROMOTION OF INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS • FINDINGS • The critical role played by Public Service leadership in the effectiveness of IGR structures  • PSL established specific institutional arrangements which gave the necessary technical support to those already provided for in the IGR Framework Act. • The creation of these structures enhanced the effective coordination and management of the overall preparations for the successful hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup. For example, Transport Technical Committee, Transport Coordinating Committee Metro Transport Forums, etc. • The elevation of important Intergovernmental Relations issues to appropriate levels of political decision-making • PSL played a pivotal role in elevating important IGR issues on the public transport infrastructure development to appropriate political decision-making level. 21

  22. PS LEADERSHIP IN THE PROMOTION OF INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS • FINDINGS (cont) • The assessment of the effectiveness of important IGR instruments • To ensure effective coordination of policy implementation between the spheres of government, the IGR Framework Act of 2005 requires that Implementation Protocols (IPs) be entered into by national, provincial and local levels. • IPs are not always developed as required or are not adequately coordinated. • The municipalities in particular appeared to know very little about the IPs. • There was, however, an indication that some Memorandum of Agreements (MOAs) were developed to support the transport development priorities related to the 2010 FIFA World Cup. 22

  23. PS LEADERSHIP IN THE PROMOTION OF INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS • FINDINGS (cont) • The extent to which IGR funding instruments are effectively utilised • The Public Transport Infrastructure and System Fund (PTIS) was established to accelerate the pace of investment in public transport and non-motorized transport infrastructure in order to meet the transport requirements for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. • It was found that- • Senior managers played a critical role in securing approval and transfer of the necessary funds. • In some instances senior managers have created an environment in which the approval and transfer of funds was quicker than expected. 23

  24. PS LEADERSHIP IN THE PROMOTION OF INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS • FINDINGS (cont) • The assessment of the effectiveness of the accountability regimes created by Public Service leadership in the promotion of IGR • The study found that PSL is hamstrung by the absence of appropriate accountability regimes between the national, provincial and local spheres of government. • For example, PSL, particularly at provincial levels cannot exercise any powers in respect of activities taking place at the local government level. • These activities include the funds obtained by local municipalities from the Department of Transport (DoT) for the purpose of developing public transport infrastructure necessary for the successful hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup. • Therefore, the absence of appropriate accountability regimes led to a situation where the overall government machinery’s ability to track progress and address challenges was severely compromised. 24

  25. PS LEADERSHIP IN THE PROMOTION OF INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS • RECOMMENDATIONS • The DPSA and COGTA must review the existing systems for managing and reporting on performance to better recognise and incentivise intergovernmental collaboration. The current provisions in the SMS Handbook for including integrated governance in all the Performance Agreements (PAs) of HoDs do not adequately achieve this.  • The DPSA and COGTA should ensure that proposals contained in the DPSA’s Framework for Managing Joint Programmes are implemented to ensure effective collaboration and coordination by PSL in the different spheres of government in implementing programmes that cut across all three levels. The implementation of the proposals in the Framework for Managing Joint Programmes must be done by not later than July 2010. • The PSL in the Offices of the Premier must be strengthened to ensure that there is sufficient capacity to monitor and support provincial departments and municipalities in the implementation of joint programmes. • The alignment of the planning frameworks should be accelerated to facilitate better intergovernmental cooperation in the resourcing and delivery of critical services such as public transport infrastructure, sanitation, water and electricity. 25

  26. REPORT ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM FOR SENIOR MANAGERS IN THE LIMPOPO PROVINCE 26

  27. IMPLEMENTATION OF PMDS FOR SMS IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE • INTRODUCTION • Given the central role played by performance contracting on the ability of state machinery to deliver services, the DPSA introduced a Performance Management Development System (PMDS) for the members of the SMS which became effective in 2002. • The intention of implementing the PMDS is to assist government and senior managers in fulfilling their mandate. • The PSC has been assessing the implementation of the PMDS in national and provincial departments. • The PSC studied the implementation of the PMDS in the Eastern Cape, North West and Northern Cape Provincial Administrations. • These studies have found in the main that departments do not comply with the basic tenets of the PMDS. 27

  28. IMPLEMENTATION OF PMDS FOR SMS IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE • FINDINGS • AN ANALYSIS OF IMPLEMENTING THE BALANCED SCORE CARD (BSC) APPROACH • In 2002 the Premier of the Limpopo Province assented to the adoption of a PMS using the BSC approach for managing performance of all employees in Limpopo provincial departments. • The BSC focuses on four key performance perspectives, namely Customer Perspective, Business Process Perspective, Financial Perspective and Learning and Growth Perspective. • PERFORMANCE CONTRACTING OR AGREEMENTS • The PMS requires SMS members to identify and formulate between three (3) to five (5) KRAs for each of the four perspectives. • As a minimum each SMS member in the Province would therefore include no less than 12 KRAs in his or her PA. • The DPSA’s PMDS advises that KRAs should not exceed five or six substantive areas of performance. • This is to ensure that departments avoid the temptation “to capture every responsibility and performance measure in the PA as this would make the tool unwieldy and ineffective”. 28

  29. IMPLEMENTATION OF PMDS FOR SMS IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE • FINDINGS • PERFORMANCE CONTRACTING OR AGREEMENTS (cont) • The DPSA’s PMDS indicates that each member must be assessed using 80:20 weighting allocation (KRAs will account for 80% of the final assessment and CMCs 20%) • By contrast the Limpopo PMS allows for flexibility in this area in that the overall weight of the Performance Plan may be more or less than 80%, and the weight of CMCs will be the difference between what has been allocated to the KRAs and 100%. • The system of identification and selection of CMCs is unique to the Province. • PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL • The SMS PMDS makes provision for a duly appointed Moderating Committee to adjudicate over the final performance assessments, the Limpopo PMS has not made provision in this regard. • The SMS PMDS requires that the total weight to be allocated to KRAs should not exceed 100%. • However, the approach used by the LPG provides for KRAs in each BSC perspective to carry a weight of 100%. Since there are four BSC perspectives, the total weighting for all KRAs is thus 400%.

  30. IMPLEMENTATION OF PMDS FOR SMS IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE • FINDINGS (cont) • OVERVIEW OF AREAS OF COMPLIANCE OF PAs WITH THE PMDS REQUIREMENTS 30

  31. IMPLEMENTATION OF PMDS FOR SMS IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE • FINDINGS (cont) 31

  32. IMPLEMENTATION OF PMDS FOR SMS IN LIMPOPO PROVINCE • RECOMMENDATIONS • The Limpopo Provincial Government should take steps as a matter of urgency to comply with the mandatory elements provided for in Chapter 4 of the SMS Handbook on the PMDS. • Training and development programmes should be organised to ensure that HR representatives and the SMS members are capacitated to better understand the system once it has been revised. • Senior managers should account for and take responsibility to enter into PAs with their supervisors by the due date of 30 April each year. The HR components should report non-compliance to HoDs, EAs and the Premier. • Departments should ensure that BPPs are meaningfully integrated with the KRAs and CMCs of the PAs of all senior managers in the Province. • Departments should take urgent steps to ensure that KRAs in the PAs of senior managers are aligned to strategic objectives as outlined in the strategic and operational plans. 32

  33. OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT FOR THE 2008/09 FINANCIAL YEAR 33

  34. FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT 2008/09 FIN YEAR • INTRODUCTION • Since the 2001/2002 financial year, the PSC has been monitoring financial misconduct reported to it by departments, and on an annual basis produces oversight reports on financial misconduct in the Public Service. • As a custodian of good governance, the PSC is mandated to promote and monitor the efficient, economic and effective use of resources. • The PSC is thus empowered to monitor and evaluate financial misconduct as determined by the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), 1999, read with the Treasury Regulations. • The intention of this Overview is to provide a statistical overview and brief trends analysis of financial misconduct cases reported to the PSC by national and provincial departments for the financial year 2008/2009. 34

  35. FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT 2008/09 FIN YEAR • STATISTICAL OVERVIEW . 35

  36. FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT 2008/09 FIN YEAR • TYPES OF FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT • The category “fraud” comprises a significant portion (53%) of the overall number of cases reported. Cases of fraud typically involve social grant fraud, subsistence and travel claim fraud, capturing fraudulent transactions and petty cash fraud. 36

  37. FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT 2008/09 FIN YEAR • LEVELS OF EMPLOYEES • The figure indicates that financial misconduct prevails at all levels in the Public Service, the highest number of cases of financial misconduct reported at salary levels 3 and 4. • There has been an increase in the number of SMS members charged with financial misconduct from 21 in the 2007/2008 to 40 in the 2008/2009 financial year. 37

  38. FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT 2008/09 FIN YEAR • OUTCOME OF CASES • In the 2008/2009 financial year, the highest number of employees (86% or 1037 cases) was found guilty following charges of financial misconduct. • This could suggest that the capacity of departments to deal with allegations of financial misconduct is improving. 38

  39. FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT 2008/09 FIN YEAR • SANCTIONS IMPOSED • The sanction of discharge from the Public Service has decreased from 47% (225 cases) in the 2002/2003 financial year to 11% (131 cases) in the 2008/09 financial year, whereas final written warnings have increased from 10% (44 cases) in the 2002/2003 financial year to the most prevailing sanction 36% (428 cases) in the 2008/2009 financial year. 39

  40. FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT 2008/09 FIN YEAR • COST OF FINANCIAL MISCONDUCT There is a substantial increase(78%) in the cost of financial misconduct from the 2007/2008 (R21 776 949) to the 2008/2009 (R 100 111 076) financial year. The total number of financial misconduct cases reported to the PSC by departments has risen by 28%, thus this has also had an impact on the amount involved. 40

  41. THANK YOU!