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Patrick Harker , President, University of Delaware. Richelle Vible , Executive Director Catholic Charities of Delaware. Steven Rathgeb Smith, Waldemar A. Nielson, Chair in Philanthropy, Georgetown University.

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Patrick Harker, President,

University of Delaware


RichelleVible, Executive Director

Catholic Charities of Delaware


Steven Rathgeb Smith,

Waldemar A. Nielson,

Chair in Philanthropy,

Georgetown University


Challenge and Opportunity for the Nonprofit Sector: Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

Steven Rathgeb Smith

Georgetown University

University of Washington

March 22, 2010


Outline of presentation
Outline of Presentation Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

  • Key trends in the nonprofit sector in the US

  • Key Challenges Facing the Sector

  • Next steps for government, nonprofits, foundations, corporations and universities in supporting the vital service and representative role of nonprofits.

  • Concluding thoughts


Growth in nonprofit organizations by type 1996 and 2008
Growth in Nonprofit Organizations by Type, 1996 and 2008 Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

Sources: IRS Business Master File 04/2009 (with modifications by the National Center for Charitable Statistics at the Urban Institute to exclude foreign and governmental organizations).


Public charities in the united states 2009
Public Charities in the United States, 2009 Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

Source: IRS Business Master File 04/2009 & The National Center for Charitable Statistics at the Urban Institute.


Economic importance of the nonprofit sector
Economic Importance of the Nonprofit Sector Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

  • Contributed $751 billion to GDP in 2006, or 5.2% of GDP

  • Paid $543.1 billion in wages and salaries in 2008, 9.4% of US Total

  • Employed an estimated 13.5 million people in 2008


Dan Rich, Professor, Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

Public Policy,

University of Delaware


Elizabeth Boris, Director, Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

Center on Nonprofits & Philanthropy, Urban Institute, Washington, D.C


Tim Delaney, President, Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and Effectiveness

National Council of Nonprofits


Aaron Strategies for Sustainability, Engagement and EffectivenessDorfman, Executive Director, National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy




There du Pont, President, Policy Institute

Longwood Foundation


Jack Policy InstituteMarkell, Governor,

State of Delaware


Tony Allen, Trustee, Policy Institute

Laffey-McHugh Foundation


Pam Cornforth, Policy Institute

Delaware Association of Nonprofit Agencies


D e l a w a r e s n o n p r o f i t s b y t h e n u m b e r s
D E L A W A R E ’ S N O N P R O F I T S Policy InstituteB Y T H E N U M B E R S*

Nonprofits Registered with the IRS » 5,866

Active Nonprofits » 958

NEW CASTLE COUNTY » 678

KENT COUNTY » 111

SUSSEX COUNTY» 169

*As of 2007


D e l a w a r e s n o n p r o f i t s b y t h e n u m b e r s1
D E L A W A R E ’ S N O N P R O F I T S Policy InstituteB Y T H E N U M B E R S

Mission Focus

  • 22% Human Services

  • 15% Education

  • 13% Arts & Culture

  • 11% Health

  • 8% Public Support & Benefit

  • 5% Public Safety

  • 4% Environment & Animal Welfare

  • 4% Religion

  • 18% Other

    (includes youth sports associations, parent-teacher organizations, booster clubs and trusts)


D e l a w a r e s n o n p r o f i t s b y t h e n u m b e r s2
D E L A W A R E ’ S N O N P R O F I T S Policy InstituteB Y T H E N U M B E R S*

Annual Operating Budgets

  • of Delaware’s Nonprofits (80%) have annual operating budgets ofless than $1 million

    Assets

    More than half the $8.2 billion total nonprofit sector assets are held by a small number of larger institutions, such as hospitals, colleges and universities and trusts.

    *As of 2007


D e l a w a r e s n o n p r o f i t s b y t h e n u m b e r s3
D E L A W A R E ’ S N O N P R O F I T S Policy InstituteB Y T H E N U M B E R S

Delaware’s Nonprofit workforce – 43,365 – is significantly larger than many Delaware industries including:

  • the 2,143 workers in the utilities industry,

  • the 14,845 employed in wholesale trade,

  • the 27,256 employed in construction.


D e l a w a r e s n o n p r o f i t s b y t h e n u m b e r s4
D E L A W A R E ’ S N O N P R O F I T S Policy InstituteB Y T H E N U M B E R S

Delaware Nonprofits Mobilize Volunteers

  • 178,000 Delawareans a year volunteer

  • 23 million Hours of service are contributed annually by Delaware volunteers

  • $460 million Is the value of those volunteer hours to the community


D e l a w a r e s n o n p r o f i t s b y t h e n u m b e r s5
D E L A W A R E ’ S N O N P R O F I T S Policy InstituteB Y T H E N U M B E R S

Sources:

Delaware Nonprofit Working Group and KBT & Associates; Corporation for National and Community Service – Volunteering in America; Urban Institute’s National Center for Charitable Statistics; Internal Revenue Service.


D e l a w a r e s n o n p r o f i t s b y t h e n u m b e r s6
D E L A W A R E ’ S N O N P R O F I T S Policy InstituteB Y T H E N U M B E R S

The Challenges Faced in Building a Membership- Based Nonprofit Association in a Small State…


Mary Kress Policy InstituteLittlepage,

KBT & Associates, author of Philanthropy in the First State


Philanthropy in the first state
Philanthropy Policy Institutein the First State

Delaware’s Nonprofits, Donors

And Grantmaking Organizations


Philanthropy, Donors & Nonprofits Policy Institute

Grantmaking Foundations

Nonprofit Organizations

State & Local Governments

Corporate Donors & Foundations

Individual Donors


1,000 active nonprofits Policy Institute

70% in New Castle County

Mostly small

(median revenues < $250,000)

Sources of Revenue

Earned Income - 37%

Contributions – 32%

Government – 24%


FINANCIAL HEALTH Policy Institute

More than 1/3 of Delaware nonprofits are operating in the red.

Nonprofits that fail to cover expenses are less likely to sustain operations over time.


  • Private Funding Sources Policy Institute

    • Private Grantmaking Foundations

    • Community & ‘Public’ Foundations

    • Corporate Donors and Foundations

    • Individual Donors


Private Foundations Policy Institute(assets greater than $1 million)

390 private foundations.

Slightly more than half are located in Delaware for legal/financial reasons.



$43.5 million Policy Institute


Community Foundations Policy Institute

& ‘Public’ Foundations

THE DELAWARE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

Wilmington

$15 million in grants awarded.

THE RODEL FOUNDATION OF DELAWARE

Wilmington

$4.7 million in program support.

UNITED WAY Of DELAWARE

Wilmington

$20.9 million in funding awarded.


Corporate Donors Policy Institute

& Foundations

  • How Corporations Give

    • Direct gifts from operating budgets

    • In-kind gifts of goods and services

    • Sponsorship of special events

    • Gifts of organized volunteer labor

    • Grants awarded through corporate foundations


Corporate Donors Policy Institute

& Foundations

  • How Corporations Give

    • Direct gifts from operating budgets

    • In-kind gifts of goods and services

    • Sponsorship of special events

    • Gifts of organized volunteer labor

    • Grants awarded through corporate foundations


Missing from that calculation…. Policy Institute

JPMorgan Chase

PNC

Verizon

Wilmington Savings Fund

Society (WSFS)

Wilmington Trust

AstraZeneca

Bank of America

Barclays

Delmarva Power

DuPont

ING

and others…….


Individual Donors Policy Institute

Delaware donors as a whole are wealthier than their counterparts nationwide


A larger percentage of Delawareans make charitable contributions than the national average.

Participation rate: The percentage who report making charitable contributions



  • Recommendations: those made by their peers nationwide.

    • Build public understanding of the way nonprofits are funded.

    • Grow a strong donors forum to encourage funder knowledge-building and collaboration.

    • Broaden the universe of foundations providing significant support to Delaware-based nonprofits.


  • Recommendations: those made by their peers nationwide.

    • Increase the transparency of foundation giving.

    • Document the role of corporate giving.

    • Encourage more robust individual giving.

    • Build strong - realistic - partnerships with public-dollar funders.


Deborah Auger, Associate Professor, those made by their peers nationwide.

UD School of Urban Affairs & Public Policy and Director of the “Forward Together” Project


Forward together project report conference on the future of the nonprofit sector 2010
Forward Together Project Report those made by their peers nationwide.Conference on the Future of the Nonprofit Sector - 2010

The Nonprofit – State Government

Working Relationship in Delaware

Deborah Auger, Forward Together Project Director

Based on Research conducted by :

Deborah Auger, Kathryn Denhardt, Maria Aristigueta, Lauren Miltenberger


Forward together project
Forward Together Project those made by their peers nationwide.

  • Funded by

    • Jessie Ball duPont Fund, the University of Delaware’s Center for Community Research & Service (CCRS), and Private Donations

  • Project Partners:

    • DHSS, DSCYF, DANA, United Way

  • Current Project Team:

    • Deborah Auger, John McNutt, Donald Unger


Project aim and activities
Project Aim and Activities those made by their peers nationwide.

To better understand and help improve the vital working relationship between Delaware state agencies and nonprofits in the human services

  • Phase I - Core Research

    • understand basics of contracting landscape

    • establish degree of participation/dependence

    • identify key sources of tension

  • Phase II – Explore and Initiate Small Strides Ideas

    • pilot the notion of cross-sector working groups to identify small scale innovations , build trust, and demonstrate possibilities for deeper reforms


Forward together project1
Forward Together Project those made by their peers nationwide.

Phase III – Forward Together Farther Initiative

  • Statewide Human Services Summit

    - Held October 29, 2009

  • State Budget Awareness /Support Human Service Budget

    - Legislative Forums, Budget Education Session at United Way, DANA Budget Briefing with JFC Chairman


Phase i research on state nonprofit agency perspectives
Phase I : Research on State & those made by their peers nationwide.Nonprofit Agency Perspectives

  • Nine Focus Groups

  • Fifty In-depth Interviews

  • Short Web surveys

  • Document analysis


Key research findings on system
Key Research Findings those made by their peers nationwide.on System

  • Strong and deepening mutual cross-sector interdependence

  • Contracting system becoming more layered and complex; difficult to navigate for both sides

  • Level of joint contracted service activity unlikely to be reversed in near term


Findings of strong and rising mutual interdependence state side
Findings of Strong and Rising Mutual Interdependence: State Side

  • .

DHSS Expenditures for Contracted Services FY 07 (including Medicaid expenditures)

DSCYF Expenditures for Contracted Services FY 07

DSCYF 38% DHSS 56%


Findings of strong and rising mutual interdependence nonprofit side
Findings of Strong and Rising Mutual Interdependence: Nonprofit Side

Operating Budgets of Delaware Human Services Nonprofits by Source


Nonprofit dependence on state contract participation rising
Nonprofit Dependence on State Contract Participation Rising Nonprofit Side

  • Table 5: Is your nonprofit holding more or fewer state contracts than five years ago?”

Same or fewer 32%

More contracts

68%


State says dependence on nonprofits unlikely to be reversed
State Says Dependence on Nonprofits Unlikely to be Reversed Nonprofit Side

  • Consequences To The State If Nonprofits No Longer Able/Willing To Provide Services?


Some key sources of tension identified
Some Key Sources of Nonprofit SideTension Identified

Administrative Issues

  •  Unrealized potentials for streamlining

  • Inconsistencies in reporting formats

  • Excessive paperwork forms “barrier to entry”

  • System has grown more complex over time, posing navigation burdens on both sides

    (e.g. new funding streams, new contract instruments, new payment approaches, new contract cycles)


Some key sources of tension identified1
Some Key Sources of Nonprofit SideTension Identified

Cost and Fiscal Issues

  • Resource issues pose the most severe challenges

  • Both sides assert state does not always pay the full cost of contracted services

  • Cost gap asserted ranged 0% to 45%; most common pegged at ~ 25%

  • Resource inadequacies pose threats to system sustainability


Some key sources of tension identified2
Some Key Sources of Nonprofit SideTension Identified

Performance Measurement Issues

  • Both anticipate strong move toward performance-based contracting

  • Nonprofits assert they lack adequate capacities to effectively measure & report program outcomes (65%)

  • State managers express concern about their own performance measurement understanding/capabilities

  • Contract managers receive very limited training for their contract management role (68%)


Some key sources of tension identified3
Some Key Sources of Nonprofit SideTension Identified

Strategic Partnership Issues

  •  Mutual aspirations for more collaborative, integrated service partnership; “In an ideal world…”

  • But state perceives greater degree of partnership at present than nonprofits do

  • Nonprofits desire better communication, opportunities for input on administrative practices/policies (60% say state seeks input “minimally” or “not at all”)


Divergent perspectives on current state of partnership
Divergent Perspectives on Nonprofit SideCurrent State of Partnership

  • -


Forward together project2
Forward Together Project Nonprofit Side

Phase III – Forward Together Farther Initiative

Statewide Human Services Summit Oct 2009

Bring new state agency leaders/administration together with nonprofits to

  • gain understanding of crucial emerging fiscal and operational challenges facing each sector

  • engage both sides in identifying and promoting deeper reforms to forge a stronger long-term partnership, capable of weathering the current crises


Statewide human services summit oct 2009
Statewide Nonprofit SideHuman Services Summit Oct 2009

  • 200 State and Nonprofit Leaders Participated

  • Review of Conditions/Updates on New State, Nat’l Developments

  • Four Workshop/Dialogues

    • Administrative Streamlining, Communication and Problem-solving

    • Expanding Capacity to Identify/Pursue Federal and Philanthropic Grants

    • Maximizing Volunteer & National Community Service Resources

    • Confronting Performance Measurement Challenges


Statewide human services summit oct 20091
Statewide Nonprofit SideHuman Services Summit Oct 2009

Sampling of Ideas on Administrative Streamlining

  • move toward one time posting of routine boilerplate information in response to RFP’s;

  • encourage state use of networked, collaborative contracting, so that smaller grass-roots organizations don’t routinely get closed out;

  • create a locus for more consistent cross-division coordination of contract management practices;

  • provide routine, scheduled opportunities for exchange of viewpoints on contract issues


Statewide human services summit 2009
Statewide Nonprofit SideHuman Services Summit 2009

Sampling of Ideas on Improved Grants Capability

  • Form a distribution clearinghouse that ensures grant opportunities get circulated widely, quickly, and across sectors

  • Create a system for ready “partner-match” where nonprofits and state agencies can easily identify potential grant partners for open opportunities

  • Secure seed funding to support cross-sector “grant start up” efforts

  • Work with local grant-makers and AFP to build skills in effective grantsmanship

  • Conduct training to demystify pursuit of federal grants


Statewide human services summit 20091
Statewide Nonprofit SideHuman Services Summit 2009

Sampling of Ideas on Volunteer and Community Service

  • Secure a round of briefings for nonprofits on opportunities to tap expanded AmeriCorps, Public Allies and other national service programs

  • Support efforts of the State Office Of Volunteerism to integrate recruitment and informational resources on volunteering

  • Create a major initiative to promote expansion in corporate volunteering as a supplement to corporate funding of nonprofits

  • Learn what works elsewhere as effective strategies to recruit/prepare committed volunteers for nonprofit boards

  • Strengthen nonprofit understanding of effective volunteer recruitment/coordination practices


Statewide human services summit 20092
Statewide Nonprofit SideHuman Services Summit 2009

Sampling of Ideas on Performance Measurement

  • Develop and secure funding for side by side state-nonprofit training in performance measurement

  • Promote consistency in state agency use of language/ terminology with respect to performance measurement

  • Assess the value of “easy to gather” outcome measures being field-tested for nonprofits nationally

  • Connect state performance measurement approaches with general strategies/language employed by United Way

  • Ensure that state performance measures set for public programs are fully informed by “street-level” perspectives of nonprofit frontline workers


Forward together project3
Forward Together Project Nonprofit Side

Concluding Observations:

  • Update on Workgroup Activity

  • Are we on path to partnership?

  • What’s needed now?


Steven Nonprofit SidePeuquet, Director,

Center for Community Research & Service, University of Delaware


What We Don’t Know but Nonprofit Side

Need to Know About

Philanthropy and Nonprofits

in Delaware

Observations by

Steven W. Peuquet, Ph.D.


First, many thanks to Mary Kress Littlepage, Pam Cornforth and Deborah Auger . . .

. . . their research and presentations give us very important information and insights into the characteristics and functioning of charitable giving and nonprofit organizations in Delaware.


However there are still gaps in our knowledge for example
However, there are still gaps in our knowledge. For example: and Deborah Auger . . .

  • Why is individual giving on a per capita basis lower in Delaware?

  • What’s really happening with corporate giving, and how/where can we get better data so we can better understand this?


Other gaps in our knowledge: and Deborah Auger . . .

  • What is the overall impact of the nonprofit sector on Delaware’s overall economy?

    • For every dollar spent in Delaware’s nonprofit sector, how does it ripple through the state’s economy?

    • Compared to other sectors, are dollars spent in the nonprofit sector more likely to circulate within the state and generate even more local economic activity?


Other gaps in our knowledge: and Deborah Auger . . .

  • What are the effects of the current recession on the financial health of nonprofits?

    • Are people being laid off

    • Are services being cut?

    • If so, what services are being cut, where are they being cut and at what rate?

    • What effects is the recession having on charitable giving?


What we need to do . . . and Deborah Auger . . .

While we need to fill some of these gaps in knowledge, we also need to conduct research on a more frequent and systematic basis. Here are my suggestions:

  • Our community should conduct a broad study of the status of philanthropy and the nonprofit sector, like the KBT & Associates Study, every 4-5 years.


What we need to do . . . and Deborah Auger . . .

  • In doing such studies, the best available secondary data sources should be used, but we also need to do some primary data collection, such as:

    • Direct surveys of nonprofits and different types of donors

    • Focus groups with key nonprofit and foundation leaders


What we need to do . . . and Deborah Auger . . .

  • For the years in between the broader studies, I recommend that, on a rotating basis, we do special studies of the conditions and needs of nonprofits in specific fields, such as:

    • Essential services to children

    • Essential services to adults

    • K-12 education, early childhood education, and day care

    • Arts and culture


Carrying out this kind of sustained research program would be money and effort well spent because
Carrying out this kind of sustained research program would be money and effort well spent because . . .

  • As a community it would help us better understand trends and problems

  • Like the current KBT & Associates study, would help us develop strategies to increase charitable giving and strengthen the capacity of key nonprofits

  • And it would provide high quality information that could be used to advocate for the sector and to raise funding from grant makers and the public


Thank you
Thank You! be money and effort well spent because . . .



Matt Policy InstituteDenn, Lieutenant Governor,

State of Delaware


Peter Morrow, President, Policy Institute

Welfare Foundation


Jon Pratt, Director, Policy Institute

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits



Helen Stewart, Vice President, Policy Institute

JP Morgan Chase


Rita Policy InstituteLandgraf, Secretary,

Delaware Department of Health and Social Services


Steve Policy InstituteBrodt, Global Manager-Privacy and Records Management, DuPont Co.


Peter Kennedy, CPA, Policy Institute

Cover & Rossiter, P.A.


Wil Policy InstituteSherk, Consultant,

Representative for Delaware Philanthropy Forum



Richelle DelawareVible, Executive Director, Catholic Charities of Delaware


Deborah Auger, Associate Professor, School of Urban Affairs & Public Policy, University of Delaware


John Baker, Director, & Public Policy, University of Delaware

Delaware Association of Nonprofit Agencies (DANA)


Rita & Public Policy, University of DelawareLandgraf, Secretary,

Delaware Department of Health and Social Services



Valerie Jack Pletcher, Board member,

DANA


Karryl Jack McManus, Director,

Division of Management Support Services, Delaware Department of Children, Youth and Their Families


Kathryn Jack Denhardt, Senior Policy Scientist, Center for Community Research & Service, University of Delaware



Leslie Newman, CEO, United Way of Delaware

Children & Families First


Steven W. United Way of DelawarePeuquet, Director, Center for Community Research & Service, University of Delaware


Tom Scott, President, United Way of Delaware

Incite Solutions, Inc.


Don United Way of DelawareCrary, Director of Kids Count Programs, Anne E. Casey Foundation




Peter Morrow, President, Wilmington Trust Company

Welfare Foundation




Raina Delaware Community Foundation Harper Allen, Director,

Community Engagement and Programs, Office of Lieutenant Governor Matt Denn


Sylvia Banks, Manager, Delaware Community Foundation

Corporate Contributions & Memberships, Dupont


Zaida Delaware Community Foundation Guajardo, Executive Director, LaEsperanza Community Center, Georgetown, DE



Cynthia GatewayShermeyer, Executive Director, Literacy Volunteers Serving Adults


Tony Allen, Trustee, Gateway

Laffey-McHugh Foundation



Paul of AmericaCalistro, Executive Director,

West End Neighborhood House


Connie Hughes, President, of America

Delaware Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (DelARF)


Ginny Marino, CEO, of America

YWCA


Jon Pratt, Executive Director, of America

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits


Charlie Copeland, Chairman, of America

Longwood Foundation Board


George of AmericaKrupanski, Executive Director, Boys & Girls Clubs of Delaware




David Woods, President, Nonprofit Organizations

Social Ventures Partners


John H. Taylor Jr., Executive Director, Delaware Public Nonprofit OrganizationsPolicy Institute