Setting us free how should we assess progress in a post levels world
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Setting us free? How should we assess progress in a post-levels world?. Alex Ford & Barbara Hibbert – Northern History Forum , November 2013. Context. So what next for progress and progression in History?.

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Setting us free how should we assess progress in a post levels world

Setting us free?How should we assess progress in a post-levels world?

Alex Ford & Barbara Hibbert – Northern History Forum, November 2013


Context
Context

So what next for progress and progression in History?

  • “As part of our reforms to the national curriculum , the current system of ‘levels’ used to report children’s attainment and progress will be removed. It will not be replaced.” (DfE, 2013)


A abolish levelling and adopt a traditional approach to progression
A – Abolish levelling and adopt a traditional approach to progression



B continue using nc levels attainment targets1
B – Continue using NC Levels / Attainment Targets

  • Level 4 “Describe”

  • Level 5 “Explain”

  • Level 6 “Analyse”

  • Level 7 “Evaluate”

  • Bloom’s Taxonomy

  • ‘…moving from National Curriculum Level 4 to Level 5 (or whatever) is not an adequate description of progress let alone a prescription for progress.’ (Counsell, 2000, p. 41)


C develop a meaningful progression model
C – Develop a meaningful progression model

  • ‘Historical thinking is neither a natural process nor something that springs automatically from psychological development . . . it actually goes against the grain of how we ordinarily think.’ (Wineburg, 1999, p. 491)

  • Mastery concept – a toolkit rather than a ladder?


C develop a new model with meaning
C – develop a new model with meaning

“Competent historical thinkers understand both the vast differences that separate us from our ancestors and the ties that bind us to them; they can analyse historical artefacts and documents, which can give them some of the best understandings of times gone by; they can assess the validity and relevance of historical accounts, when they are used to support entry into a war, voting for a candidate, or any of the myriad decisions knowledgeable citizens in a democracy must make. All this requires “knowing the facts,” but “knowing the facts” is not enough. Historical thinking does not replace historical knowledge: the two are related and interdependent.” (Seixas, 2008, p. 6)


The big six as a model
The Big Six as a Model

  • Mastery concept – a toolkit rather than a ladder?

  • Seixas and Morton:

    • Historical Significance

    • Evidence

    • Continuity and Change

    • Cause and Consequence

    • Historical Perspectives

    • The Ethical Dimension

  • What should OUR Big Six be?

  • Inspiration

  • Expertise in Departments

  • Teaching History

  • Schools History Project

  • Historical Thinking Project (free chapters)

  • Various books and articles


One possible model for causation
One Possible Model for Causation

What SIGNPOSTS would indicate a mastery of Causation?

What misconceptions would need to be overcome?

  • Causation

  • Change and Continuity

  • Historical Evidence

  • Historical Interpretation

  • Historical Perspectives

  • Communication

  • Change happens because of MULTIPLE CAUSES and leads to many different results or consequences. These create a WEB of related causes and consequences.

  • Different causes have different LEVELS OF INFLUENCE. Some causes are more important than other causes.

  • Historical changes happen because of two main factors: The actions of HISTORICAL ACTORS and the CONDITIONS (social, economic etc.) which have influenced those actors.



Student appropriate progression models
Student appropriate progression models

  • Student friendly models

  • How can these be worded?

  • If it is too complex to explain, is it appropriate for KS3?

  • Can these tie into assessments? How?

  • How can we give students a concrete sense of achievement as well as a model for mastery?


Different concepts
Different Concepts?

  • There are major differences between modern WORLD-VIEWS and those of people in the past, this means their beliefs, values and motivations.

  • The perspectives of HISTORICAL ACTORS are best understood by thinking about the CONTEXT in which people lived and the WORLD-VIEWS that influenced them.

  • Looking at the perspective of an HISTORICAL ACTOR means drawing INFERENCES about how people thought and felt in the past. It does not mean using modern WORLD-VIEWS to imagine the past.

  • What do we value in History?

  • How do we want them to think historically?

  • Any good history begins in strangeness. The past should not be comfortable. the past should not be a familiar echo of the present…The past should be so strange that you wonder how you and the people you know and love could come from such a time…When you have traced this trajectory, you have learnt something.” (White, 1998, p. 13)


Historical perspectives
Historical Perspectives

  • Application to the Black Death?

  • Unit of work looking at the impact of the Black Death and exploring reaction of people in Britain

  • Begin with a chapter of John Hatcher’s “Black Death” as the disease arrives in Alice’s village.

  • Students could continue the story looking at impact on how people reacted.

  • Could add to the story as the history develops… Understanding perspectives


Where next
Where Next?

  • Open up debate and discussion as a profession. Share models, assessments, student progression models and ideas

    • History Teachers Discussion Forum

    • Contacting the HA directly

    • Blog on andallthat.co.uk -> Teachers -> 2014 Gove KS3 Blog

  • Range of other concepts in the Appendix as well as examples of assessments, medium term planning sheets and other tools

  • Opportunity to lead other subjects and whole school practice – get the assessment that we want


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