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AHA Presenter Disclosure Information. Susan J. Pressler “How to Write a Strong Nursing-Based Abstract for AHA/ASA’s Scientific Conferences” Disclosure Information: No conflict of interest to disclose for this presentation Funding from NIH for research grants.

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    1. AHA Presenter Disclosure Information • Susan J. Pressler “How to Write a Strong Nursing-Based Abstract for AHA/ASA’s Scientific Conferences” • Disclosure Information:No conflict of interest to disclose for this presentation • Funding from NIH for research grants S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    2. AHA Presenter Disclosure Information • Debra K. Moser“How to Write a Strong Nursing-Based Abstract for AHA/ASA’s Scientific Conferences” • Disclosure Information:No conflict of interest to disclose for this presentation • Funding from NIH for research grants S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    3. How to Write a Strong Nursing-Based Abstract for AHA/ASA’s Scientific Conferences Debra K. Moser, DNSc, RN, FAAN, FAHA1 Susan J. Pressler, DNS, RN, FAAN, FAHA2 1University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky 2University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    4. Goals of Today’s Webinar • Describe procedures for writing a scientific abstract for presentation at AHA/ASA meetings • Present ‘tips’ for writing successful abstracts • Provide examples of strong abstracts S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    5. Before You Begin to Write S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    6. Background Work • Review the Call for Abstracts guidelines • What is the purpose of the meeting? • Who is the audience? • What is the format, including word limit? • How is the abstract submitted? • Only data-based studies? • Only completed studies? S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    7. Background Work • Consider the ‘fit’ between the Call and your study • Peer Review Process – find the evaluation criteria from the organization • reviewers will use the criteria and you want your abstract to be competitive S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    8. Plan Ahead • It takes time to write – Plan ahead and start early • often need more analyses and input from others • Experience helps - Work with a mentor or colleague • Review examples of other abstracts – Circulation (available online) S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    9. Writing Tips Strive for perfection and precision • Carefully proofread for spelling and grammatical errors and ‘typos’ • Limit use of abbreviations – too many are very distracting • Follow guidelines for word limits, margins, and font size S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    10. Writing A Scientific Abstract S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    11. 1. Parts of the Abstract • Title • Background • Objectives/Purposes/Aims • Method • Results • Conclusions The exact headings may vary according to the organization’s guidelines S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    12. Structured Abstracts • We recommend using structured abstracts • These use the main headings to separate parts of the abstract • This method • Makes the abstract easier to read • Clearly identifies parts of the study S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    13. 1. The Title • Make it descriptive • Make it important • Make it compelling S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    14. 1. The Title - Examples • Quality of life among stroke survivors OR • Depression and functional status predict quality of life in stroke OR • Do depression and functional status predict quality of life in stroke survivors? S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    15. 2. Background • Usually limited to 1 sentence so make it specific • Use a problem statement approach Despite the fact that ___ strokes/MIs occur annually, • Little is known about … • Information is lacking about… S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    16. 2. Background - Examples • Little is known about the relationship between variable 1 and variable 2 in [sample]. 2. HTN contributes to mortality in patients after stroke, but interventions to improve antihypertensive medication adherence in these patients are lacking S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    17. 3. Objectives/Purposes • Limit to 1 or 2 sentences; these can be directly from a study • Flow directly from the problem statement that you identified in the background • Critical element because • it tells the reviewer exactly what to expect in the rest of the abstract • reviewer makes judgment about the importance of the topic based on this part S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    18. 3. Objectives/Purposes - Examples Background: Little is known about the relationship between variable 1 and variable 2 in [sample]. Objective: To examine the relationship between variable 1 and variable 2 in persons with [condition]. S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    19. 3. Objectives/Purposes - Examples Background: HTN contributes to mortality in patients after stroke, but interventions to improve antihypertensive medication adherence in these patients are lacking Objective: To test a nurse-based computerized intervention designed to improve adherence to antihypertensive medications and improve survival among stroke survivors S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    20. 3. Objectives/Purposes - Examples Objective: To test a nurse-based computerized intervention designed to improve adherence to antihypertensive medications and improve survival among stroke survivors Intervention = nurse-based, computerized Outcomes (dependent variables) = adherence and survival Sample = stroke survivors S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    21. 4. Methods Succintly tells the study’s: • Design • Procedure • Sample • Measures • Statistical analysis S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    22. 4. Methods (Cont.) • Critical component because • it tells the reviewer what to expect in the results section • it gives us information about the quality and strength of the study S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    23. Reference: Pressler SJ, Subramanian U, Kareken D, et al. Cognitive function is poorer in heart failure. Circulation. 2008;118:S_768 Abstract 2718 http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/118/18_MeetingAbstracts/S_768-a?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&displaysectionid=Effect+of+Heart+Failure+on+the+Patient+and+Family&volume=118&issue=18+Supplement&resourcetype=HWCIT S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing

    24. The End of Part 1 S. J. Pressler, University of Michigan School of Nursing