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BSBIMN501A. Manage an information or knowledge system . QUEENSLAND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ACADEMY . Manage use of information of knowledge management system . 2.3 Monitor integration and alignment with data and information systems.

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bsbimn501a
BSBIMN501A

Manage an information or knowledge system

QUEENSLAND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ACADEMY

manage use of information of knowledge management system
Manage use of information of knowledge management system

2.3 Monitor integration and alignment with data and information systems

integrating with other information or knowledge management systems
Integrating with other information or knowledge management systems
  • Single step changes whereby a new system completely replaces an older one, are not always in the best interest of an organisation.
  • Furthermore, these types of implementations are becoming rarer as the capabilities of information and knowledge management systems increase.
  • For example, nowadays it is common for a new system, such as a customer information system, to be integrated with an existing product and service management system.
integrating with other information or knowledge management systems1
Integrating with other information or knowledge management systems
  • With the help of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, data can be integrated from each of the information management applications into one collective database.
  • Alternatively, databases from different information systems can be connected via enterprise application integration (EAI) software which creates a 'bridge' between the systems.
levels of system dependability
Levels of system dependability
  • Integration between different systems can occur at various levels, each requiring more or less inter- dependability.
  • The ability to respond to the information output becomes faster when there is greater dependability between systems.
  • However, increased dependability also means that when technical problems occur, their impact is more devastating than with systems that are less dependable on one another.
information sharing between systems
Information sharing between systems
  • Simply sharing information between systems so that various workers can access it, but not necessarily alter or add to it, is the most basic level of integration.
  • This level occurs when, for example, only those responsible for placing orders in a customer information system can input and change information in that system, but workers in another area, such as those responsible for manufacturing, have permission to view the information for production planning.
  • There is no system responsiveness between the customer information and manufacturing information.
information coordination between systems
Information coordination between systems
  • Coordination between one system and another occurs when the functions of one system are dependent on the functions of another.
  • For example, workers in the sales department must keep those responsible for manufacturing up-to-date with the demand for products, and those in manufacturing are responsible for keeping the sales department informed of new products being planned.
  • Information is passed back and forth between systems but each system performs its functions independently.
information collaboration between systems
Information collaboration between systems
  • When information or knowledge management systems are used for collaboration between functions and processes, there is a high level of inter-dependence.
  • For instance, information contained in the customer service system is shared by marketing, manufacturing and accounting systems and is used to streamline manufacturing processes, plan marketing strategies and develop budgets.
  • The identities of each system become less distinctive as the functions begin to blend together.
how are data and information systems aligned
How are data and information systems aligned?
  • More often than not, new systems are being integrated with old ones.
  • Organisations grow, amalgamate with other organisations, and/or change their business direction.
  • Each time this happens, the issue of integrating and aligning different systems arises.
how are data and information systems aligned1
How are data and information systems aligned?
  • There is often overlapping functionality between the different systems.
  • For example, many information or knowledge management systems incorporate an accounts payable and receivable function within them even though it is not their primary function.
how are data and information systems aligned2
How are data and information systems aligned?
  • Potential problems can occur when:
    • data input occurs at multiple entry points
    • data is duplicated on different systems
    • responsibility for ensuring data quality has not been assigned.
how are data and information systems aligned3
How are data and information systems aligned?
  • Creating order out of the chaos of multiple systems is a job for an expert in information architecture.
  • Nevertheless, all business managers should strive to understand the principles involved with data alignment.
how are data and information systems aligned4
How are data and information systems aligned?
  • Making modifications to a system that has a high dependence with another can often have unanticipated and wide-ranging consequences.
  • Creating major modifications to information system architecture is also a costly affair.
  • These logistical and cost issues will lead some organisations to stagnate and avoid making system changes, but over time, this only compounds the problem.
how are data and information systems aligned5
How are data and information systems aligned?
  • One of the issues of having multiple systems is that the data exists in what is termed 'silos'.
  • Silos refer to data sources that don't integrate between systems.
  • In the early days of using computers to automate processes, these silos existed independently and performed their operations with a view to minimising the need for human intervention.
  • The idea of using the same data across different areas of the business had not been developed.
how are data and information systems aligned6
How are data and information systems aligned?
  • Once people realised the value of integrating and aligning data sources between systems, they began to formulate solutions using EAI or ERP systems.
  • Data alignment involves reorganising and regrouping data elements, such as a client name and all the data that is related to that client so that there is no repetition of elements in different databases or parts of a database.
  • This is achieved by giving each grouping of elements a unique number called a 'primary key'.
how can we monitor system integration
How can we monitor system integration?
  • Just as we needed to develop a plan for monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of the system, we also need a plan for monitoring its integration with data and other information systems.
  • All the considerations listed in Section 2.1 about how monitoring should be done, who is responsible for doing the monitoring and what should be monitored also apply to the integration process
how can we monitor system integration1
How can we monitor system integration?
  • In addition, throughout the system's integration process, the following should be monitored:
    • configuration of system's hardware components
    • networking configurations
    • data conversions and migrations between systems
    • status of processes and operations
    • user interfaces
    • hard disc usage
    • security features
monitoring workers using the system
Monitoring workers using the system
  • You will also need to monitor how different types ofworkers are coping with using the system once it is integrated.
  • Bear in mind that some workers, who have not previously shared data from their area of the business before and are now required to do so, may have issues to raise on this matter.
monitoring workers using the system1
Monitoring workers using the system
  • Monitoring workers can be achieved by:
    • consulting with workers on an individual or group basis
    • requesting feedback from workers via questionnaires and surveys
    • tracking the number of calls to the help desk
    • tracking complaints
    • providing a forum via the company intranet for workers to post their comments about using the system