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Arithmetic Operators. Topics Arithmetic Operators Operator Precedence Evaluating Arithmetic Expressions In-class Project Incremental Programming Reading Section 2.5. Arithmetic Operators in C. Name Operator Example Addition + num1 + num2 Subtraction - initial - spent

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Arithmetic Operators


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    1. Arithmetic Operators Topics • Arithmetic Operators • Operator Precedence • Evaluating Arithmetic Expressions • In-class Project • Incremental Programming Reading • Section 2.5

    2. Arithmetic Operators in C • NameOperatorExample • Addition + num1 + num2 • Subtraction - initial - spent • Multiplication * fathoms * 6 • Division / sum / count • Modulus % m % n

    3. Division • If both operands of a division expression are integers, you will get an integer answer. The fractional portion is thrown away. • Examples : 17 / 5 = 3 • 4 / 3 = 1 • 35 / 9 = 3

    4. Division (con’t) • Division where at least one operand is a floating point number will produce a floating point answer. • Examples : 17.0 / 5 = 3.4 • 4 / 3.2 = 1.25 • 35.2 / 9.1 = 3.86813 • What happens? The integer operand is temporarily converted to a floating point, then the division is performed.

    5. Division By Zero • Division by zero is mathematically undefined. • If you allow division by zero in a program, it will cause a fatal error. Your program will terminate execution and give an error message. • Non-fatal errors do not cause program termination, just produce incorrect results.

    6. Modulus • The expression m % n yields the integer remainder after m is divided by n. • Modulus is an integer operation -- both operands MUST be integers. • Examples : 17 % 5 = 2 • 6 % 3 = 0 • 9 % 2 = 1 • 5 % 8 = 5

    7. Uses for Modulus • Used to determine if an integer value is even or odd • 5 % 2 = 1 odd 4 % 2 = 0 even • If you take the modulus by 2 of an integer, a result of 1 means the number is odd and a result of 0 means the number is even. • The Euclid’s GCD Algorithm (done earlier)

    8. Arithmetic Operators Rules of Operator Precedence • Operator(s)Precedence & Associativity • ( ) Evaluated first. If nested(embedded), innermost first. If on same level, left to right. • * / % Evaluated second. If there are several, evaluated left to right. • + - Evaluated third. If there are several, evaluated left to right. • = Evaluated last, right to left.

    9. Using Parentheses • Use parentheses to change the order in which an expression is evaluated. • a + b * c Would multiply b * c first, then add a to the result. • If you really want the sum of a and b to be multiplied by c, use parentheses to force the evaluation to be done in the order you want. • (a + b) * c • Also use parentheses to clarify a complex expression.

    10. Extended Example • Given integer variables a, b, c, d, and e, where a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, evaluate the following expression: • e = b % d / c * b – a e = ( b % d ) / c * b – a e = ( ( b % d ) / c ) * b – a e = ( ( ( b % d ) / c ) * b ) – a e = ( ( ( ( b %d ) / c ) * b ) – a ) e = ( ( ( ( 2 % 4 ) / 3 ) * 2 ) – 1 )

    11. Extended Example (cont’d) • e = ( ( ( ( 2 % 4 ) / 3 ) * 2 ) – 1 ) e = ( ( ( ( 2 ) / 3 ) * 2 ) – 1 ) e = ( ( ( 2 / 3 ) * 2 ) – 1 ) e = ( ( ( 0 ) * 2 ) – 1 ) e = ( ( 0 * 2 ) – 1 ) e = ( ( 0 ) – 1 ) e = ( 0 – 1 ) e = – 1 Note: Always use parenthesis when you have more than two operators!

    12. Good Programming Practices Always use parenthesis when you have more than two operators!

    13. Extended Example • Given integer variables a, b, c, d, and e, where a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, evaluate the following expression: • e = b % d / c * b – a e = ( b % d ) / c * b – a e = ( ( b % d ) / c ) * b – a e = ( ( ( b % d ) / c ) * b ) – a e = ( ( ( ( b %d ) / c ) * b ) – a ) e = ( ( ( ( 2 % 4 ) / 3 ) * 2 ) – 1 )

    14. Another Extended Example • Given integer variables a, b, c, d, and e, where a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, • evaluate the following expression: • d = e = 1 + a + b * d % c d = e = 1 + a + ( b * d ) % c d = e = 1 + a + ( ( b * d ) % c ) d = e = ( 1 + a ) + ( ( b * d ) % c ) d = e = ( ( 1 + a ) + ( ( b * d ) % c ) ) d = ( e = ( ( 1 + a ) + ( ( b * d ) % c ) ) ) d = ( e = ( ( 1 + 1 ) + ( ( 2 * 4 ) % 3 ) ) )

    15. Another Extended Example (cont’d) • d = ( e = ( ( 1 + 1 ) + ( ( 2 * 4 ) % 3 ) ) )d = ( e = ( ( 1 + 1 ) + ( ( 8 ) % 3 ) ) )d = ( e = ( ( 1 + 1 ) + ( 8 % 3 ) ) )d = ( e = ( ( 1 + 1 ) + ( 2 ) ) )d = ( e = ( ( 1 + 1 ) + 2 ) )d = ( e = ( ( 2 ) + 2 ) )d = ( e = ( 2 + 2 ) )d = ( e = ( 4 ) )d = ( e = 4 )d = 4 /* e is now set to 4 and so is d */

    16. Practice With Evaluating Expressions • Given integer variables a, b, c, d, and e, where a = 1, b = 2, c = 3, d = 4, • evaluate the following expressions: • a + b - c + d • a * b / c • 1 + a * b % c • a + d % b - c • e = b = d + c / b - a

    17. A Sample Project • Let’s write a program that computes and displays the volume and surface area of a box. (I’ll help with prompting the user and displaying the results.) • Procedure: • Use the pseudocode that we developed in “Algorithms, Part 3 of 3” • Convert the algorithm to code • Clean up the code (spacing, indentation, commenting)

    18. The Box - Pseudocode Display “Enter the height: “ Read <height> While (<height> <= 0 ) Display “The height must be > 0” Display “Enter the height: “ Read <height> End_while

    19. The Box - Pseudocode (con’t) Display “Enter the width: “ Read <width> While (<width> <= 0 ) Display “The width must be > 0” Display “Enter the width: “ Read <width> End_while

    20. The Box - Pseudocode (con’t) Display “Enter the depth: “ Read <depth> While (<depth> <= 0 ) Display “The depth must be > 0” Display “Enter the depth: “ Read <depth> End_while

    21. The Box - Pseudocode (con’t) <volume> = <height> X <width> X <depth> <surface1> = <height> X <width> <surface2> = <width> X <depth> <surface3> = <height> X <depth> <surface area> = 2 X (<surface1> + <surface2> + <surface3>)

    22. The Box - Pseudocode (con’t) Display “Height = “, <height> Display “Width = “, <width> Display “Depth = “, <depth> Display “Volume = “, <volume> Display “Surface Area = “, <surface area>

    23. Good Programming Practice • It is best not to take the “big bang” approach to coding. • Use an incremental approach by writing your code in incomplete, yet working, pieces. • For example, for your projects, • Don’t write the whole program at once. • Just write enough to display the user prompt on the screen. • Get that part working first (compile and run). • Next, write the part that gets the value from the user, and then just print it out.

    24. Good Programming Practice (con’t) • Get that working (compile and run). • Next, change the code so that you use the value in a calculation and print out the answer. • Get that working (compile and run). • Continue this process until you have the final version. • Get the final version working. • Bottom line: Always have a working version of your program!

    25. Using the Incremental Approach • Let’s think about how we could have developed the volume and surface area program incrementally.