IPv6 based Applications – Accessibility and Usability? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

gunela astbrink tedicore isoc au australian ipv6 summit 31 oct 1 nov 2005 n.
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IPv6 based Applications – Accessibility and Usability?
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IPv6 based Applications – Accessibility and Usability?

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  1. Gunela Astbrink TEDICORE & ISOC-AU Australian IPv6 Summit 31 Oct – 1 Nov 2005 IPv6 based Applications – Accessibility and Usability?

  2. Overview • Consumer applications of IPv6 • What is accessibility and usability? • Inclusive design • User-centred design • Possible applications • Future for IPv6 consumer applications

  3. Consumer applications of IPv6 • Early but important stages • Accessibility and usability may be key market incentive for uptake of IPv6 consumer applications • Example of smart homes • Korean “ubiquitous home” • Security, information, entertainment and communication

  4. Consumer applications of IPv6 • Factors to consider for successful deployment of smart housing applications • Affordability • Compatibility and standards • Ease of use • Multi-modality • Involvement by users in set-up • Relevance to peoples' lives

  5. What is usability? • User-friendly and intuitive • Easy to configure • Easy to maintain • Backwards compatible

  6. What is accessibility? • Reduction of barriers to use • Leading to usability by majority of population regardless of age or functional ability • This includes people with a disability • Innovative solutions for people with a disability lead to innovative solutions for everyone • Speech recognition • Scanner

  7. Inclusive design • Also called: • Design for all • Universal design • Not “one size fits all” • Roots in architecture • Adopted by accessibility advocates in IT&T • Principles developed by Center for Universal Design

  8. Seven principles of inclusive design • Equitable use • Flexibility in use • Simple and intuitive use • Perceptible information • Tolerance for error • Low physical effort • Size and space for approach and use

  9. Principles of inclusive design 1. Equitable use • People in a variety of situations and with a variety of functional requirements can use the device 2. Flexibility in use • Individual abilities and preferences are accommodated. 3. Simple and intuitive use • No particular experience, language skill or concentration is needed

  10. Inclusive design principles 4. Perceptible information • Relevant information is provided regardless of ambient environment conditions or users' sensory abilities 5. Tolerance for error • Hazards and consequences of adverse actions are minimised

  11. Inclusive design principles 6. Low physical effort • Interaction with device promotes comfort and efficiency and reduces fatigue 7. Size and space for approach and use • Appropriate size and space is provided for reach, manipulation and use regardless of user's body size, posture or mobility

  12. Strategies of inclusive design • For designers to better integrate features at the outset that meet the needs of as many users as possible – including people with disabilities • 3 levels of Inclusive Design: • Mainstream products using Inclusive Design principles • Mainstream products designed for connection with assistive devices • Specially designed products (COST 219, 1997)

  13. Examples of inclusive design • Large displays and good contrast • good in low light conditions AND for person with vision loss • Large buttons • good for men with big fingers or wearing gloves AND for person with arthritis, limited motor control or vision loss

  14. Examples of inclusive design • Good sound quality • good in noisy environments AND good for people with hearing loss • Intuitive navigation systems • Good for people needing to make fast decisions AND for older people

  15. User-centred Design • Active involvement of user in design process • Iterative design and evaluation process • Multi-disciplinary approach • Most often used in a corporate context

  16. User involvement • Throughout the design process, interaction between users and developers to understand and define: • The context of use • The tasks • How people will use the future product (ETSI, 2002)

  17. Industry perspectives • ICT corporations in Japan use inclusive design and interact with users during product development • Corporate Social Responsibility • Ageing population • Good market sense

  18. Possible applications • Scenarios from COST 219ter • Based on recognised needs • Solutions for identified issues • COST 219ter is a European Commission project on telecommunications and disability with 18 member countries as well as USA, Japan and Australia

  19. SCENARIO: In the kitchen Courtesy: Making Life Easier – COST 219ter (2005) http://www.cost219.org

  20. SCENARIO: Preparing to catch a bus Courtesy: Making Life Easier - COST 219ter (2005) http://www.cost219.org

  21. The future is close! • Will accessibility and usability be a natural part of product development? • Can assistive devices be easily plugged into any product? • Will products be user-friendly? • Will IPv6 based consumer appliances be accepted in the market-place?