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The Civil War

The Civil War

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The Civil War

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  1. The Civil War The CivilWar

  2. The Ten Costliest Battles of the Civil War • Battle of Fort Donelson • Battle of Shiloh • Battle of Stone’ River • Battle of Second Manassas • Battle of The Wilderness • Battle of Antietam • Battle of Spotsylvania • Battle of Chancellorsville • Battle of Chickamauga • Battle of Gettysburg

  3. The Battle of Fort Donelson February 13-16, 1862

  4. The Battle of Fort Donelson • Location: Tennessee • Confederate Commander: John B. Floyd/Simon B. Buckner • Union Commander: Ulysses S. Grant • Confederate Forces Engaged: 21,000 • Union Forces Engaged: 27,000 • Winner: Union • Casualties: 19,455 (2,832 Union and 16,623 Confederate) #10

  5. # 9 The Battle of Shiloh Date: April 6-7, 1862 Location: Tennessee Confederate Commander: Albert Sidney Johnston/ P. G. T. Beauregard Union Commander: Ulysses S. Grant Confederate Forces Engaged: 40,335 Union Forces Engaged: 62,682 Winner: Union Casualties: 23,741 (13,047 Union and 10,694 Confederate)

  6. Battle of Stone’s River #8 December 21, 1862 Battle of Second Manassas #7 August 29-30, 1862 Location: Virginia Confederate Commander: Robert E. Lee Union Commander: John Pope Confederate Forces Engaged: 48,527 Union Forces Engaged: 75,696 Winner: Confederacy Casualties: 25,251 (16,054 Union and 9,197 Confederate • Location: Tennessee • Confederate Commander: Braxton Bragg • Union Commander: William S. Rosecrans • Confederate Forces Engaged: 37,739 • Union Forces Engaged: 41,400 • Winner: Union • Casualties: 24,645 (12,906 Union and 11,739 Confederate)

  7. Battle of The Wilderness #6May 5-7, 1864 Location: Virginia Confederate Commander: Robert E. Lee Union Commander: Ulysses S. Grant Confederate Forces Engaged: 61,025 Union Forces Engaged: 101,895 Winner: Inconclusive Casualties: 25,416 (17,666 Union and 7,750 Confederate)

  8. The Battle of Antietam #5 The Bloodiest Single Day in the Civil War

  9. Antietam • September 17, 1862 • Robert E Leevs. George B.McClellan • Winner: Inconclusive(Strategic Union Victory) • Total Loss of Life: 26,134 (12,410 Union and 13,724 Confederate)

  10. Two Confederate Wins Battle of Spotsylvania #4 Battle of Chancellorsville #3 May 1-4, 1863 Location: Virginia Confederate Commander: Robert E. Lee Union Commander: Joseph Hooker Confederate Forces Engaged: 60,892 Union Forces Engaged: 133,868 Winner: Confederacy Casualties: 30,099 (17,278 Union and 12,821 Confederate) • May 8-19, 1864 • Location: Virginia • Confederate Commander: Robert E. Lee • Union Commander: Ulysses S. Grant • Confederate Forces Engaged: 50,000 • Union Forces Engaged: 83,000 • Winner: Confederacy Casualties: 27,399 (18,399 Union and 9)000 Confederate)

  11. The Battle of Chickamauga September 19-20, 1863 Location: Georgia Confederate Commander: Braxton Bragg Union Commander: William Rosecrans Confederate Forces Engaged: 66,326 Union Forces Engaged: 58,222  Winner: Confederacy Casualties: 34,624 (16,170 Union and 18,454 Confederate) #2

  12. #1 Gettysburg

  13. Gettysburg The Costliest Battle of the Civil War 51,112 men died

  14. Gettysburg Robert E. Lee George M. Meade

  15. Gettysburg July 1-3, 1864 Confederacy Union Union Forces 82,289 troops Confederate Forces 75,000 troops Victory!!!

  16. Gettysburg Address

  17. Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

  18. The End By: Shelley Gregory