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Martyn Sloman and Jessica Rolph Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development www.cipd.co.uk/presentations m.sloman @cipd.co.uk. Welcome. E-learning: the learning curve. 1. New role for training has emerged based on people as competitive advantage . 3. 2. Implementing e-learning

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slide1

Martyn Sloman and Jessica RolphChartered Institute of Personnel and Developmentwww.cipd.co.uk/presentations m.sloman @cipd.co.uk

Welcome

E-learning: the learning curve

our agenda

1

New role for training has emerged based

on people as competitive advantage

3

2

Implementing e-learning

- some practical issues

E-learning must be put in its proper context

Our agenda
some questions
Some questions
  • What is the most important training problem facing you in your organisation?
    • pressure on budgets and costs?
    • time for the learner to receive training?
    • ensuring the quality of training provision?
    • designing training programmes that meet the needs of the business?
  • How are training and learning different?
time the scarce resource
Time - the scarce resource
  • HRD 2002 On-line poll:
  • What is the most important training problem facing you in your organisation?
    • pressure on budgets and costs? 29%
    • time for the learner to receive training? 38%
    • ensuring the quality of training provision? 6%
    • designing training programmes that meet the needs of the business? 27%
global drivers of change
Global drivers of change
  • New ways of competing through people/new business models
  • New technology platforms built on the connectivity of computers

Directly and indirectly make us rethink our role in the organisation

perspectives on competition
Perspectives on competition
  • Resource based strategies
  • Human Capital
slide7

HR interventions

Training and Development

Career opportunity

Performance Appraisal

Job challenge

Job security

Pay satisfaction

Recruitment

Team-working

Communication

Involvement

slide8

Discretionary behaviour

brings it to life

Organisation commitment

Motivation

Job satisfaction

Discretionary behaviour

Performance outcomes

CIPD research:Understanding the HR-performance link

A summary of this research ‘Sustaining success in difficult times’ is free to download from the CIPD website:

www.cipd.co.uk/researchsummaries

slide9

Discretionary learning

  • Because of the nature of the business we can't train everyone to do everything. The emphasis is on getting people to learn within the environment where they work and getting them to adapt and apply that knowledge
  • Lorna McKee, Area HR Manager, Hilton Belfast
the trainer s nirvana
The trainer’s nirvana

Self-confident individuals seeking to acquire the requisite knowledge and skills to enable them to meet customer/client requirements and advance the organisation’s goals or objectives

slide11

How can we make this aspiration a reality?

Put e-learning in its proper context: e-learning is about learning - not about technology

slide12

ASTD State of the Industry Report 2002

“Use of Learning Technology”

1997 – 9.1% 1998 – 8.5%

1999 – 8.4% 2000 – 8.8%

2001 – 10.5%

Projection for 2004 ???

the stuff
“The stuff”
  • Generic modular learning objects
  • Specific/tailor made modular learning objects – content delivered to the desktop
the stir

Desktop hannel

Connect

Enter your name

Interactive Question

Polling Area

PresentationArea

Message Center

“The stir”
  • Moderated asynchronous discussion groups
  • Synchronous ‘real-time’ desktop learning- presented by subject matter experts
using the leap desktop channel

Desktop Channel

Connect

Enter your name

Interactive Question /

Polling Area

PresentationArea

Message Center

Using the LEAP desktop channel
the future is on its way ivimeds www ivimeds org20
The future is on its way: IVIMEDS www.ivimeds.org

‘technology is now available to allow medical schools across the world to share resources….financially beneficial to share teaching materials…. participants get access to rich pool of information

the future is on its way ivimeds www ivimeds org21
The future is on its way: IVIMEDS www.ivimeds.org

50 medical schools at initial conference in June 2002 including Dundee, Miami, Barcelona and…...

poll questions
Poll questions

Do you agree or disagree?

  • e-learning demands a new attitude to learning on the part of learners
  • the first generation of e-learning products does not demonstrate what the future will look like
  • e-learning demands an entirely new skill set for people involved in training and development
  • e-learning is more effective when combined with more traditional forms of learning
slide23
e-learning demands a new attitude to learning on the part of learners (90.2% agreed)
  • the first generation of e-learning products does not demonstrate what the future will look like (69.3% agreed)
  • e-learning demands an entirely new skill set for people involved in training and development (64.7% agreed)
  • e-learning is more effective when combined with more traditional forms of learning (62.7% agreed)

CIPD 2002 : Annual T&D Survey & Who Learns at Work?

slide24

A fourth birthday question

What are the major barriers to the effective implementation of e-learning?

The potential of e-learning is huge - but progress to date has been patchy

e learning the learning curve
E-learning: The Learning Curve
  • tenorganisations who are committed to e-learning
  • structured interview research

www.cipd.co.uk/changeagendas

.

we asked participating organisations
We asked participating organisations

how are they overcoming problems?

what is on their agenda?

what advice could they give others?

what strategies are they employing?

what problems have they encountered?

organisations
Organisations

RetailOrg

where are we today
Where are we today?
  • organisations and approaches to e-learning were very different
  • commonality of experience and perceptions about the nature and the extent of challenges

To make e-learning work, every organisation must advance up its own learning curve.

six crucial areas
Six crucial areas

strategic intent

introducing the

system

content

“blended

learning”

measurement

and monitoring

supporting

learning

strategic intent
Strategic intent

some have embraced and used e-learning strategically to:

support wider business strategies

  • respond to changing market conditions
  • meet regulatory requirements
  • inform business objectives

strategic intent

others have gone for a project by project basis

strategic intent 2
Strategic intent (2)
  • 2 examples to illustrate
introducing the system
Introducing the system
  • access to PCs
  • employee IT skills and experience
  • organisational context
introducing the system 2
Introducing the system (2)
  • 2 examples to illustrate:
  • Public sector use of European/International Computer Driving Licence
  • Retailorg
content
Content

Poor content means that users can’t concentrate

  • poor design
  • limitations of generic material

It needs to be highly relevant, no dumbing down, good use of multi-media and an enjoyable learning experience

We always use tailor-made materials so we can use our own language in terms of competencies

content 2
Content (2)

It needs to be highly relevant, no dumbing down, good use of multi-media and an enjoyable learning experience

  • cultural differences
  • increasing use of bespoke material

Accents have been a problem

We always use tailor-made materials so we can use our own language in terms of competencies

blended learning
Blended learning
  • is it new?
  • has it any meaning?
  • who is using it?
  • is it simply about the order of presenting material?

‘Blended learning is the current fad. Add e-learning to a perfectly good trainer-led programme and call it blended learning’

blended learning at shell
Blended learningat Shell
  • learners taken through a set of activities during a course
  • learners expected to contribute reusable material
  • requires considerable commitment

‘A learning experience is more than just on-line, it’s about learning from others in the workplace, connecting to others and finding out how to share information’

poll question
Poll question

What has the greatest influence on the effectiveness of e-learning?

Motivation of the learner

Support for learning

Time to learn

supporting learning
Supporting learning

what has the greatest influence?

Part of the role of the organisation is to support, encourage and motivate people to learn

1. motivation

2. support

3. time

measurement and monitoring
Measurement and monitoring
  • current e-learning practice concentrates on usage, recording and reporting time spent on-line
  • higher level evaluation remains a problem

Our overall measure is whether a person has been successfully up-skilled and can apply them. This is the same for e-learning and the classroom

We measure anything between 10 minutes and 3 hours. One hour on-line equates to 3 hours in the classroom. Then we calculate costs

similarities contradictions
Similarities & contradictions
  • continued belief in e-learning
  • no-one is cutting back - many can demonstrate resource savings
  • seeking alignment with business needs
  • motivation is seen as critical
  • but
  • strategies for learning vary tremendously
  • ambitions for e-learning are different
some conclusions
Some conclusions
  • approach e-learning as a change management process
  • all six areas must be discussed
  • every organisation will have their own learning curve

E-learning is about learning and not about technology – a recognition of this is fundamental to the success of e-learning.

return to the basics of learning
Return to the basics of learning
  • learning is the process by which a person constructs new skills, knowledge and capabilities
  • training is one of a portfolio of responses an organisation can undertake to promote learning.

www.cipd.co.uk/howdopeoplelearn

.

a new paradigm
A new paradigm
  • an integrated approach to creating competitive advantage through people in the organisation
  • emphasis on the learner and their acceptance of responsibility.
  • a recognition that time is the scarce resource

A focus on the learner

a new paradigm45
A new paradigm
  • learner can access information any time, anywhere, instantaneously and up to date
  • learner can generate and share information
  • from “just in case to just in time to just for you”

A focus on the learner