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BADMINTON - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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BADMINTON

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  1. BADMINTON

  2. Have some fun with badminton

  3. Badminton Equipment 5 ft high Net Shuttlecock or birdie Rackets

  4. Badminton Court

  5. Forehand Grip This grip is used to hit shots that are on the forehand side of your body and around the head shots. Hold the racket head with your non-playing hand so that the handle points towards you. Your racket face shall be perpendicular to the floor. Place your playing hand on the handle as if you are shaking hands with it. There shall be a V shape in between your thumb and your index finger. The racket handle shall rest loosely in your fingers for greater flexibility. Can try shortening your grip and place it nearer to the shaft to increase control and accuracy when serving and hitting from the forecourt and midcourt. www.badminton-information.com

  6. Backhand Grip This grip is used to hit shots that are on the backhand side of your body. Hold the racket as you would on a forehand grip. Turn the racket anti-clockwise so that the V shape moves leftwards. Place your thumb against the back bevel of the handle for greater leverage and power. The racket handle shall also rest loosely in your fingers. Can try shortening your grip and place it nearer to the shaft to increase control and accuracy when serving and hitting from the forecourt and midcourt. www.badminton-information.com

  7. Badminton Serve The badminton serve is to be performed underhanded. The whole shuttle shall be below the server’s waist at the instant of being hit by the server’s racket. The service is to cross the net diagonally to the receivers court.

  8. Backhanded Service The service can also be performed backhanded Not recommended for beginners

  9. Badminton Clears Badminton Clears are the most common and important of all badminton strokes. They can be played overhead or underarm. They can be played both forehand and backhand.

  10. Overhead Clear Use the clear to move your opponent to the backcourt. It will create space in the frontcourt for you to exploit. It will also give you more time to go back to your base. The optimum hitting zone is located somewhere above the central area of your racket. You can play two types of Badminton Clears, Attacking Clear and Defensive Clear. www.badminton-information.com

  11. pointers for playing a forehand overhead clear Adopt the forehand grip. Turn your body and stand sideways to the net with your non-racket shoulder facing the net. Shift your weight on to your rear foot. Bend your elbow and lock your wrist preparing to swing forward. Raise your non-racket hand and point at the shuttle to improve timing and balance. Contact the shuttle as high as possible and in front of your body using a strong throwing action as if you are going to throw your racket high and forward through the air. Straighten your elbow as you hit the shuttle. Let your wrist unlock with a whip action as you hit the shuttle. Follow through with your racket and shift your weight from your rear foot to your front foot. Move back to your base position. www.badminton-information.com

  12. Attacking Clear Attacking clear has a trajectory that runs almost parallel to the ground. The shuttle travels flat and fast towards your opponents back court. These badminton shots allow less time to your opponent to get behind the shuttle, potentially causing weak returns. The shuttle is hit square with your racket face. www.badminton-information.com

  13. Defensive Clear Defensive Clear has a high and deep trajectory. These badminton shots give you more time to return to your base and prepare for the next shot. The shuttle is hit with your racket face leaning slightly backwards. www.badminton-information.com

  14. Overhead Rally

  15. Underarm Clear The underarm clear is usually played from the front court area to your opponent’s back court. Whether to play it high and deep or a flatter, cross court clear will depend on the situation at that time and your opponent’s positioning on court. In any case, try to reach the shuttle as early as possible so that you can have various shot options. Your wrist action is the crucial element in creating a deception for your shots. www.badminton-information.com

  16. some pointers for the underarm clear Adopt the forehand grip for a forehand underarm clear or the backhand grip for a backhand underarm clear. Extend and put your racket up when you go for the shot. The point of impact shall be well out in front of you and as high as possible with your racket leg leading in a lunge position. Swing your racket upwards as the shuttle drops in the hitting area. Unlock your wrist as you contact the shuttle, producing a whip action. Follow through with your racket in the direction of the shuttle’s trajectory. Push with both legs and move back to your base position. www.badminton-information.com

  17. Drive Badminton Drive shots are shots that crosses the net flatly in a horizontal trajectory. It can be played both on the forehand and backhand sides. The drive is an attacking shot that is usually played from the sides of the court when the shuttle has fallen too low for it to be returned with a smash. The shuttle shall be between your shoulder and knee height. It is widely used in doubles as players want to keep the shuttle low. Although to a lesser extent in the singles, it is an important stroke as well. www.badminton-information.com

  18. More on the Drive A flat and fast drive is useful in getting the shuttle behind your opponent, potentially causing them to make a weak return. You can also change your tactics and play a flat but slower drive shot that falls in the frontcourt or midcourt area. It all depends on the situation you are in and the on court positioning of your opponent. Badminton drive shot can be played diagonally crosscourt or straight down the line. Your stroking motion is similar to a sidearm throwing motion. Footwork is important as you need to shuffle or glide to your sides to make the shot.

  19. pointers for the forehand drive Adopt the forehand grip. Lead with your racket leg and side step towards the shuttle on your forehand. Your racket foot shall be pointing towards the sideline. Lock your wrist and draw your racket arm back in a sidearm, backswing motion. Your forehand grip and backswing place the racket parallel to the floor with your palm up. Put your body weight on your racket leg as you swing your racket arm forward. Extend your racket arm, roll your forearm over, and contact the shuttle as your wrist unlocks. Hit the shuttle in front of your racket foot at the highest point possible. Turn your racket inwards for cross court shots. Racket head square to the shuttle for shots straight down the line. Follow through naturally with your racket arm. Shift your body weight from your racket leg to your non-racket leg. Move back to your base position. www.badminton-information.com

  20. pointers for the backhand drive Adopt the backhand grip. Lead with your non-racket leg or crossover with your racket leg to your backhand side. Lock your wrist and draw your racket arm back in a sidearm, backswing motion. Your backhand grip and backswing place the racket parallel to the floor with your palm down. Put your body weight on your leading leg as you swing your racket arm forward. Extend your racket arm, roll your forearm over, and contact the shuttle as your wrist unlocks. Hit the shuttle in front of your leading foot at the highest point possible. Turn your racket inwards for cross court shots. Racket head square to the shuttle for shots straight down the line. Follow through naturally with your racket arm. Shift your body weight from your leading leg to your non-leading leg. Move back to your base position. www.badminton-information.com

  21. Drop Shots Badminton Drop Shots are delicate badminton shots that can win you points outright if executed well with deception. These shots can be played both on the forehand and backhand sides. Use the badminton drop shot to move your opponent to the frontcourt. It will create space in the midcourt and backcourt for you to exploit. Wrist action is essential in providing the disguise and element of surprise. The optimum hitting zone is located somewhere above the central area of your racket. You can play two types of Badminton Drop Shots, Slow Drop Shot and Fast Drop Shot. www.badminton-information.com

  22. slow drop shot A slow drop shot shall land in your opponent’s frontcourt area, as close to the net as possible. The point of impact is above the racket shoulder. It is intended to move your opponent to the frontcourt, hopefully forcing a weak return to your midcourt for you to kill. www.badminton-information.com

  23. fast drop shot A fast drop shot shall land in the front of your opponent’s mid court area, preferably to the sides. Hit the shuttle slightly further in front of the body to produce a shallower trajectory at a faster speed. It is intended to catch your opponent off balance and have less time to respond. www.badminton-information.com

  24. pointers for a forehand overhead drop shot Adopt the forehand grip. Turn your body and stand sideways to the net with your non-racket shoulder facing the net. Shift your weight on to your rear foot. Bend your elbow and lock your wrist preparing to swing forward. Raise your non-racket hand and point at the shuttle to improve timing and balance. Contact the shuttle as high as possible and out in front of your body. Straighten your elbow as you hit the shuttle. Slice or tap the shuttle as you hit it, reducing the speed of the racket head. The angle of the racket face will determine the direction of your shot. Follow through with your racket and shift your weight from your rear foot to your front foot. Move back to your base position. www.badminton-information.com

  25. Smash Badminton Smash is the most potent of all badminton shots. There is almost no defense against a well executed smash. It can be played both on the forehand and backhand sides. The smash is a shot hit with power and speed downward to your opponent’s court. The angle and the steepness of the shuttle’s trajectory will make it hard for your opponent to retrieve. Contact the shuttle further in front of your body than the clear or the drop shot. The optimum hitting zone is located somewhere above the central area of your racket. www.badminton-information.com

  26. pointers for forehand overhead smash Adopt the forehand grip. Turn your body and stand sideways to the net with your non-racket shoulder facing the net. Shift your weight on to your rear foot. Bend your elbow and lock your wrist preparing to swing forward. Raise your non-racket hand and point at the shuttle to improve timing and balance. Contact the shuttle as high as possible and in front of your body using a strong throwing action as if you are going to throw your racket high and forward through the air. Straighten your elbow as you hit the shuttle. Snap down your wrist at the point of impact giving the shuttle extra power and angle towards your opponent’s court. Follow through with your racket and shift your weight from your rear foot to your front foot. Move back to your base position. www.badminton-information.com

  27. jump and smash You can also jump and smash the shuttle at the same time to generate more power and create a steeper angle for the shot. This will give your opponent even lesser time to react. As this is a more advance shot, master the normal badminton smash first before taking on any jumping smash. The feeling of being able to smash powerfully and kill off a point is really great. But try not to get carried away. As the badminton smash requires a lot of energy, use it only when the opportunity arises. For example, a weak clear from your opponent to your midcourt area. Do not tire yourself out unnecessarily. www.badminton-information.com

  28. STARTING A GAME Before a game, players have to decide who is first to hit the shuttle to begin the game. This procedure is known as a "toss up" (same as seen on TV in a soccer match) and can be done with a coin or with the shuttle. Using the shuttle, it is hit straight upwards by either player and the side the base of the shuttle points to on landing gets the choice of starting or the side they want to begin on. The "winner" cannot choose both to begin service and his/her preferred side of the court. Depending on the first choice, the opponent gets to select the other.

  29. The Service Players take their positions and start in the right court. The first stroke of a game in badminton is known as the "service". It is hit from below the server's waist in an upward stroke to the receiver's court. The serve has to land in the area between the short service line and the baseline for singles (1-on-1) and between the short service line and the long service line for doubles (2-on-2).

  30. Where To Stand To Serve The game always starts with service hit diagonally from the right-hand court to the corresponding right-hand court on the other side. To help identify which court you should be in when serving, remember that all "even" numbers are from the right court (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 .. 14); all "odd" numbers from the left (1, 3, 5, 7, 9 .... 15). The points are accumulated until a player reaches 15, at which point the game is won. Note: If the score for both players reaches 14-all (14-14), the server must give his opponent the choice of playing 3 extra points to break the tie (this is called "setting") or playing straight to 15. http://student.dcu.ie/~lohg2/HowToPlay.htm

  31. PLAYING THE POINT Once the shuttle is struck by the server, the receiver is now required to return the service, and may sent it to any part of the server's side of the court. The players (server & receiver) then proceed to hit the shuttle alternately (trading strokes) until one side unable to return the shuttle, allows it to land outside the court or fails to return it because of a mishit. The exchange of strokes is known as a "rally". There is no limit to the number of strokes in a rally. During play, each player hits the shuttle in turn over the net. When the shuttle arrives on your side of the court, it may only be struck ONCE to return it over the net. Hitting it twice or more is a fault and gives your opponent the service or the point.

  32. BADMINTON FAULTS On the service the racket head is too high or contact of shuttle is made above the waist. The shuttle lands in the wrong court on the serve. Service to wrong court, short, or out of the court. Server or receiver is in the wrong court. Shuttle touches person or clothing. Shuttle lands out of boundary lines (LINES ARE GOOD). Shuttle goes under the net, or hits the wall or ceiling. Shuttle does not cross the net. Shuttle is hit more than once while on one side of net. Shuttle is struck before it crosses the net. Shuttle is thrown or carried with the racket. Net is touched by anything other than the shuttle.

  33. KEEPING SCORE As with most games, badminton is won and lost by points being scored. In class we will play our singles games to 11 points, and our doubles games to 21. In singles you may only accumulate (add) points to your score if you are serving. If you win a rally, but were not serving, you win the service back, but do not increase you score immediately. In doubles we will use rally point scoring, where every service will result in a point being scored.

  34. Doubles rally point scoring The service passes consecutively to the players. At the beginning of the game and when the score is even, the server serves from the right court. When it is odd, the server serves from the left court. If the serving side wins a rally, the serving side scores a point and the same server serves again from the alternate service court. If the receiving side wins a rally, the receiving side scores a point. The receiving side becomes the new serving side. The player of the receiving side who served last stays in the same service court from where he served last. The reverse pattern applies to the receivers partner. The players do not change their respective service courts until they win a point when their side is serving.

  35. GOOD ETIQUETTE HAND SHAKES This should be done at the end of a game; good play and sportsmanship must always be acknowledged.

  36. Ready to take a shot at some questions? Click on the correct answer to the following. Click birdie when you are ready

  37. Our singles game of badminton is played to 11 points 15 points 21 points

  38. click here to try again

  39. YES – YOU’VE GOT IT ! Click on the birdie and move on to the next question

  40. In rally point scoring, the badminton doubles game is played to 11 points 15 points 21 points

  41. click here to try again

  42. YES – YOU’VE GOT IT ! Click on the birdie and move on to the next question

  43. The badminton net is 3 feet high 5 feet high 7 feet high 10 feet high

  44. click here to try again

  45. YES – YOU’VE GOT IT ! Click on the birdie and move on to the next question

  46. In a badminton game, the first serve of the game starts in The court the proper server is standing The left service court The right service court

  47. click here to try again

  48. YES – YOU’VE GOT IT ! Click on the birdie and move on to the next question

  49. In a badminton game when the servers score is even the service is made from The court the proper server is standing The Left service court The Right service court

  50. click here to try again