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Interpreting Remainders in Division. Let’s Look Back…. Solve the problem.

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Presentation Transcript
slide2

Let’s Look Back…

  • Solve the problem

The 7 fifth grade teachers decided to give their students a pizza party on the last day of school to celebrate their graduation. The teachers ordered 52 pizzas to split evenly among their classes. How much pizza will each teacher receive for their class?

  • Label the dividend, divisor, quotient, and remainder.
  • Try to determine what would happen to the remainder in this problem.

Stephanie Sharrer

slide3

Let’s Discuss

  • Share your solution, labels, and interpretation of what the remainder means in this problem with your shoulder partner.
  • Who would like to share their solution with the class?

Stephanie Sharrer

slide4

Read Aloud

  • As I read aloud A Remainder of One, work through each problem presented in your notebook.

Stephanie Sharrer

slide5

Think-Pair-Share

  • Try to come up with at least 1 thing we could do with the remainder in a problem.

Stephanie Sharrer

slide6

Methods of Interpreting the Remainder

  • Drop the remainder (Drop It)
  • Add 1 to the quotient (Add It)
  • Use the remainder as the answer (Use It)
  • Keep the remainder and write it as a fraction or a decimal (Keep It)

Stephanie Sharrer

slide7

Let’s Take a

  • Susan and Brianna baked 274 cupcakes. They brought the cupcakes to school for their friends in cupcake trays. If each tray holds 4 cupcakes, how many cupcake trays will they need to bring all the cupcakes to school?

Stephanie Sharrer

slide8

Let’s Take a

  • What operation are we using? How do you know?
  • What is the dividend?
  • What is the divisor?

Division because we are sharing

274 (total number of cupcakes)

4 (number of cupcakes

held in each tray)

Stephanie Sharrer

slide9

Let’s Take a

6

8

quotient

_____

4)274

-

24

_____

4

3

-

32

_____

2

remainder

Stephanie Sharrer

slide10

Let’s Take a

  • What does the quotient (68) mean?
  • What does the remainder (2) mean?
  • If I want to know how many trays Susan and Brianna will need to take ALL of the cupcakes to school, what will I do with the remainder?
  • So how many trays will Susan and Brianna need?

68 trays with 4 cupcakes each

2 cupcakes not in trays

Add It! (add 1 more tray so that the 2 remaining cupcakes will also be packed for school)

68 + 1 more = 69 trays

Stephanie Sharrer

slide11

Let’s Change It Up a Little

  • Susan and Brianna baked 274 cupcakes. They brought the cupcakes to school for their friends in cupcake trays.
  • If each tray holds
  • 4 cupcakes, how many cupcake trays will they
  • need to bring all the cupcakes to school?

How many cupcakes

will be in the partially full tray?

USE IT…So there are 2 cupcakes in the partially full tray

T-P-S: What are we looking for now? What are we going to do with the remainder to find the answer?

Stephanie Sharrer

slide12

Another Example

  • Susan and Brianna baked 274 cupcakes. They brought the cupcakes to school for their friends in cupcake trays.
  • If
  • each tray holds 4 cupcakes,
  • how many cupcake trays will
  • they need to bring all the
  • cupcakes to school?

How

many full trays of cupcakes

will Susan and Brianna have?

68 trays had 4 cupcakes each and 1 tray had the 2 leftover cupcakes So how many FULL trays will there be?

DROP IT…there are 68 full trays

Stephanie Sharrer

slide13

One More Time

  • Susan and Brianna baked 274 cupcakes. They brought the cupcakes to school for their friends in cupcake trays.
  • If each tray holds
  • 4 cupcakes, how many cupcake trays will they
  • need to bring all the cupcakes to school?

If Susan and

Brianna are splitting the cupcakes between

4 classes, how many cupcakes will each

teacher get?

Stephanie Sharrer

slide14

One More Time

  • What operation are we using? How do you know?
  • What is the dividend?
  • What is the divisor?

Division because we are sharing

274 (total number of cupcakes)

4 (number of classes the cupcakesare being split between)

Stephanie Sharrer

slide15

One More Time

6

8

quotient

_____

4)274

-

24

_____

4

3

-

32

_____

2

remainder

Stephanie Sharrer

slide16

One More Time

  • What does the quotient (68) mean?
  • What does the remainder (2) mean?
  • What is going to be done with the 2 left over cupcakes?
  • So how many trays will each class get?

68 full cupcakes for each teacher

2 cupcakes left over

They will be cut and split between the classes

68 2/4 cupcakes, or 68 ½ cupcakes(the remainder is used as a fraction over the divisor)

Stephanie Sharrer

let s review

Let’s Review

And go over some key words and differences between methods

Stephanie Sharrer

slide18

Drop It!

  • Ignore the remainder and only use the quotient as your answer.
  • Use this when the question asks for FULL or WHOLE items or when the item cannot easily be split in real life.

Add It!

Take the quotient and add 1 more.

Use this when everything or everyone has to fit and you can’t leave anything out.

Share It!

Include the remainder in your answer as a fraction or a decimal.

Use this with money, food, or measurements that are easy to split in real life.

Use It!

Use the remainder (and not the quotient) as your answer.

Use this when the question asks how much is left over or left out or partially filled.

Stephanie Sharrer

group work time

Group Work Time

Now it’s time for you to practice!

Stephanie Sharrer

slide20

Directions

  • Work in your group to solve word problems
  • Use the 4 ways to interpret remainders-Drop It, Keep It, Add It, Use It-in your discussions with your group members
  • Complete 2 word problems and your checklist at each station
    • The checklist tells you what needs to be done for each word problem and also asks you to explain how you knew which method of interpreting the remainder to choose for each question.
  • Now each of you need to take your math notebook, a pencil, and checklist with you to the group number station.

Questions?

Stephanie Sharrer

time is up

Time Is Up!

Now it’s time for individual practice!

Stephanie Sharrer

slide22

On Your Own

  • Now it is time to show what you have learned.
  • Solve the multi-step problem provided in your math notebook.
  • When you have completed ALL parts of the question, raise your hand and I will check your work.
  • Once your work has been checked, write a reflection on what you learned using The Most Important Thing About template.

Stephanie Sharrer

slide23

The Most Important Thing About…

The most important thing about interpreting remainders is…

Really Important Detail #1:

Really Important Detail #2:

Really Important Detail #3:

But the most important thing about interpreting remainders is…

Stephanie Sharrer

slide24

On Your Own

Be sure to answer EVERY part of the problem.

192 students want to play football in the Spring Lake League. If 7 people can play on each team, how many full teams can be made?

How many students will be left out?

How many teams would be necessary in order to allow every student to play?

Stephanie Sharrer