kinetic energy lecturer professor stephen t thornton n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Kinetic Energy Lecturer: Professor Stephen T. Thornton PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Kinetic Energy Lecturer: Professor Stephen T. Thornton

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 37

Kinetic Energy Lecturer: Professor Stephen T. Thornton - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 148 Views
  • Uploaded on

Kinetic Energy Lecturer: Professor Stephen T. Thornton.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Kinetic Energy Lecturer: Professor Stephen T. Thornton' - jocelyn-mays


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

Reading Quiz:Two marbles, one twice as heavy as the other, are dropped to the ground from the roof of a building. Just before hitting the ground, the heavier marble hasA) the same kinetic energy as the lighter one.B) half as much kinetic energy as the lighter one.C) twice as much kinetic energy as the lighter one.D) four times as much kinetic energy as the lighter one.

answer c

Answer: C

The velocities will be the same in this case, so the only difference in the kinetic energy is due to the mass. Because the mass is twice as much, the kinetic energy is twice as much.

last time

Last Time

Discussed the concept of work

today

Today

Discuss kinetic energy

Work-energy theorem

conceptual quiz
Conceptual Quiz

In a baseball game, the catcher stops a 90-mph pitch. What can you say about the work done by the catcher on the ball?

A) catcher has done positive work

B) catcher has done negative work

C) catcher has done zero work

conceptual quiz1
Conceptual Quiz

In a baseball game, the catcher stops a 90-mph pitch. What can you say about the work done by the catcher on the ball?

A) catcher has done positive work

B) catcher has done negative work

C) catcher has done zero work

The force exerted by the catcher is opposite in direction to the displacement of the ball, so the work is negative. Or using the definition of work (W = F d cos q ), because = 180º, thenW < 0. Note that because the work done on the ball is negative, its speed decreases.

Follow-up: What about the work done by the ball on the catcher?

definition of kinetic energy

Definition of kinetic energy

Unit of kinetic energy is the joule, J.

Q. Why do we define this?

A. It turns out to make our calculations easier!

work energy theorem

Work-Energy Theorem

The total work done on an object is equal to the change in its kinetic energy:

This is a general result, even for a force not constant in magnitude and direction. Do spring demo.

slide11

Kinetic Energy and

the Work-Energy Principle

Energywas traditionally defined as the ability to do work. We now know that not all forces are able to do work; however, we are dealing in these chapters with mechanical energy, which does follow this definition.

slide12

Because work and kinetic energy can be equated, they must have the same units: kinetic energy is measured in joules. Energy can be considered as the ability to do work:

slide13

To find work, we have to be sure about what force is exerting the effort. Here we might ask about the work done by friction, gravity, air resistance, or the engine. Not a good figure. Forces are not accurate.

doing work against gravity
Doing Work Against Gravity

Energy is reclaimed in this case.

doing work against friction
Doing Work Against Friction

Energy is not reclaimed in this case.

slide17

Does the Earth do work on the moon?

The Moon revolves around the Earth in a nearly circular orbit, with approximately constant tangential speed, kept there by the gravitational force exerted by the Earth. Gravity does no work, because the displacement and force are perpendicular.

slide18

Cable Tension, Work. A 265-kg load is lifted 23.0 m vertically with an acceleration a = 0.150g by a single cable. Determine (a) the tension in the cable; (b) the net work done on the load; (c) the work done by the cable on the load; (d) the work done by gravity on the load; (e) the final speed of the load assuming it started from rest.

slide19

Crate Friction. A 46.0-kg crate, starting from rest, is pulled across a floor with a constant horizontal force of 225 N. For the first 11.0 m the floor is frictionless, and for the next 10.0 m the coefficient of friction is 0.20. What is the final speed of the crate after being pulled these 21.0 m?

slide20

Paintball. In the game of paintball, players use guns powered by pressurized gas to propel 33-g gel capsules filled with paint at the opposing team. Game rules dictate that a paintball cannot leave the barrel of a gun with a speed greater than 85 m/s. Model the shot by assuming the pressurized gas applies a constant force F to a 33-g capsule over the length of the 32-cm barrel. Determine F (a) using the work-energy principle, and (b) using the kinematic equations and Newton’s second law.

conceptual quiz2
Conceptual Quiz

A child on a skateboard is moving at a speed of 2 m/s. After a force acts on the child, her speed is 3 m/s. What can you say about the work done by the external force on the child?

positive work was

done

B) negative work was done

C) zero work was done

conceptual quiz3
Conceptual Quiz

A child on a skateboard is moving at a speed of 2 m/s. After a force acts on the child, her speed is 3 m/s. What can you say about the work done by the external force on the child?

positive work was

done

B) negative work was done

C) zero work was done

The kinetic energy of the child increased because her speed increased. This increase in KE was the result of positive work being done. Or, from the definition of work, because W = DKE = KEf – KEi and we know that KEf > KEi in this case, then the work W must be positive.

Follow-up: What does it mean for negative work to be done on the child?

conceptual quiz4
Conceptual Quiz

A) 20 m

B) 30 m

C) 40 m

D) 60 m

E) 80 m

If a car traveling 60 km/hr can brake to a stop within 20 m, what is its stopping distance if it is traveling 120 km/hr? Assume that the braking force is the same in both cases.

conceptual quiz5
Conceptual Quiz

A) 20 m

B) 30 m

C) 40 m

D) 60 m

E) 80 m

If a car traveling 60 km/hr can brake to a stop within 20 m, what is its stopping distance if it is traveling 120 km/hr? Assume that the braking force is the same in both cases.

F d = Wnet = DKE = 0 – mv2,

and thus, |F| d = mv2.

Therefore, if the speed doubles,

the stopping distance gets fourtimes larger.

slide25

Work Done by a Constant Force

  • Solving work problems:
  • Draw a free-body diagram.
  • Choose a coordinate system.
  • Apply Newton’s laws to determine any unknown forces.
  • Find the work done by a specific force.
  • To find the net work, either
    • find the net force and then find the work it does, or
    • find the work done by each force and add.
conceptual quiz6
Conceptual Quiz

By what factor does the kinetic energy of a car change when its speed is tripled?

A) no change at all

B) factor of 3

C) factor of 6

D) factor of 9

E) factor of 12

conceptual quiz7
Conceptual Quiz

By what factor does the kinetic energy of a car change when its speed is tripled?

A) no change at all

B) factor of 3

C) factor of 6

D) factor of 9

E) factor of 12

Because the kinetic energy is mv2, if the speed increases by a factor of 3, then the KE will increase by a factor of 9.

Follow-up: How would you achieve a KE increase of a factor of 2?

conceptual quiz8
Conceptual Quiz

Two stones, one twice the mass of the other, are dropped from a cliff. Just before hitting the ground, what is the kinetic energy of the heavy stone compared to the light one?

A) quarter as much

B) half as much

C) the same

D) twice as much

E) four times as much

conceptual quiz9
Conceptual Quiz

Two stones, one twice the mass of the other, are dropped from a cliff. Just before hitting the ground, what is the kinetic energy of the heavy stone compared to the light one?

A) quarter as much

B) half as much

C) the same

D) twice as much

E) four times as much

Consider the work done by gravity to make the stone fall distance d:

DKE = Wnet = F d cosq

DKE = mg d

Thus, the stone with the greater mass has the greater

KE, which is twice as big for the heavy stone.

Follow-up: How do the initial values of gravitational PE compare?

conceptual quiz10
Conceptual Quiz

A) 0  30 mph

B) 30  60 mph

C) both the same

A car starts from rest and accelerates to 30 mph. Later, it gets on a highway and accelerates to 60 mph. Which takes more energy, the 0  30 mph, or the 30  60 mph?

conceptual quiz11
Conceptual Quiz

A) 0  30 mph

B) 30  60 mph

C) both the same

A car starts from rest and accelerates to 30 mph. Later, it gets on a highway and accelerates to 60 mph. Which takes more energy, the 0  30 mph, or the 30  60 mph?

The change in KE ( mv2 ) involves the velocitysquared.

So in the first case, we have: m (302− 02) = m (900)

In the second case, we have: m (602− 302) = m (2700)

Thus, the bigger energy change occurs in the second case.

Follow-up: How much energy is required to stop the 60-mph car?

conceptual quiz12
Conceptual Quiz

A) 2 W0

B) 3 W0

C) 6 W0

D) 8 W0

E) 9 W0

The work W0 accelerates a car from 0 to 50 km/hr. How much work is needed to accelerate the car from 50 km/hr to 150 km/hr?

conceptual quiz13
Conceptual Quiz

A) 2 W0

B) 3 W0

C) 6 W0

D) 8 W0

E) 9 W0

The work W0 accelerates a car from 0 to 50 km/hr. How much work is needed to accelerate the car from 50 km/hr to 150 km/hr?

Let’s call the two speeds v and 3v, for simplicity.

We know that the work is given by W = DKE = KEf – Kei.

Case #1: W0 = m (v2–02) = m (v2)

Case #2: W = m ((3v)2–v2) = m (9v2–v2) = m (8v2) = 8 W0

Follow-up: How much work is required to stop the 150-km/hr car?

conceptual quiz14

m1

m2

Conceptual Quiz

Two blocks of mass m1 and m2 (m1 > m2) slide on a frictionless floor and have the same kinetic energy when they hit a long rough stretch (m > 0), which slows them down to a stop. Which one goes farther?

A)m1

B) m2

C) they will go the same distance

conceptual quiz15

m1

m2

Conceptual Quiz

Two blocks of mass m1 and m2 (m1 > m2) slide on a frictionless floor and have the same kinetic energy when they hit a long rough stretch (m > 0), which slows them down to a stop. Which one goes farther?

A)m1

B) m2

C) they will go the same distance

With the same DKE, both blocks must have the same work done to them by friction. The friction force is less for m2so stopping distance must be greater.

Follow-up: Which block has the greater magnitude of acceleration?

conceptual quiz16
Conceptual Quiz

A golfer making a putt gives the ball an initial velocity of v0, but he has badly misjudged the putt, and the ball only travels one-quarter of the distance to the hole. If the resistance force due to the grass is constant, what speed should he have given the ball (from its original position) in order to make it into the hole?

A) 2 v0

B) 3 v0

C) 4 v0

D) 8 v0

E) 16 v0

conceptual quiz17
Conceptual Quiz

A golfer making a putt gives the ball an initial velocity of v0, but he has badly misjudged the putt, and the ball only travels one-quarter of the distance to the hole. If the resistance force due to the grass is constant, what speed should he have given the ball (from its original position) in order to make it into the hole?

A) 2 v0

B) 3 v0

C) 4 v0

D) 8 v0

E) 16 v0

In traveling four times the distance, the resistive force will do four times the work. Thus, the ball’s initial KE must be four times greater in order to just reach the hole—this requires an increase in the initial speed by a factor of 2, because KE = mv2.