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Psychological Risk Factors in Families of Autistic Children PowerPoint Presentation
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Psychological Risk Factors in Families of Autistic Children

Psychological Risk Factors in Families of Autistic Children

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Psychological Risk Factors in Families of Autistic Children

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  1. Psychological Risk Factors in Families of Autistic Children Gouva, M., Dragioti, E., Kitta, M., Albani, E., Bakou, E., Paschou A. & Kotrsotsiou, E. Medical School - Postgraduate Program “Primary Care Health”, University of Thessaly – Greece School of Health, Higher Technological Educational Institution of Epirus, Greece Department of Nursing, Higher Technological Educational Institution of Larissa, Greece Age did not differ significantly among the two groups (t=.016, p=.986). Logistic regression found that significant positive correlations were obtained for certain independent risk factors, namely internal shame (OR=0.9, 95%CI .85-.92), anxiety (OR=1.35 95%CI 1.09-1.67) and paranoid hostility (OR=1.93, 95%CI 1.28-2.92), after adjusting for sociodemographic - related variables. Results Introduction . Large bodies of work have shown that parents of children with disabilities experienced a disproportionately greater level of stress relating to their children. Aim To examine the impact of autism spectrum disorder on the family and compared to with families of diabetic children Table 2: Logistic Regression Analysis of demographic and psychometric variables for families with a child with autism. A community sample of 105 parents of autistic children (36 men – 69 women, mean age 41 years, SD = 6,5 ranged 30-56) and 83 parents of children with diabetes (18 men – 65 women, mean age 41 years, SD = 7 ranged 24-54) participated to the present study. The families were recruited if their children had been diagnosed with autism or diabetes for at least 1 year and had no other comorbid chronic illnesses. No children age restrictions were applied. The two groups were completed a) the Other of Shame scale (OAS) b) the Experience of Shame Scale (ESS) c) the Symptom Check-List Revised (SCL-90) d) the Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire (HDHQ) and e) questionnaire concerning socio-demographic information. Materials and Methods Table 1: Cronbach's a (alpha) coefficients of questionnaires’ internalconsistency • Holroyd J, McArthur D. (1976). Mental retardation and stress on the parents: Α contrast between Down’s syndrome and childhood autism. Am J Ment Retard, 80:431−436. • Honey E, Hastings RP, McConachie H. (2005). Use of the questionnaire on resources and stress (QRS-F) with parents of young children with autism. Autism, 9:246-−255. • Kersh J, Hedvat TT, Hauser-Cram P, Warfield ME. (2006). The contribution of marital quality to the well-being of parents of children with developmental disabilities. J Intellect Disabil Res, 50:883−893 • King GA, Zwaigenbaum L, King S, Baxter D, Rosenbaum P, Bates A. (2006). A qualitative investigation of changes in the belief systems of families of children with autism or Down syndrome. Child Care Health Dev, 32:353−369. References Shame, anxiety and paranoid hostility were found significant for families with a child with autism. Conclusion