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CHEST PAIN PowerPoint Presentation

CHEST PAIN

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CHEST PAIN

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  1. CHEST PAIN

  2. Objectives • Describe various etiologies for chest pain • Review approach to chest pain • Focus on life threatening causes of Chest Pain.

  3. What are the 6 cause of chest pain that can kill?

  4. Chest Pain That Can Kill • Acute Coronary Syndromes • Pulmonary Embolism • Aortic Dissection • Esophageal Rupture • Pneumothorax • Pneumonia Various others: Pulmonary HTN, Myocarditis, Tamponade

  5. Common “benign” causes of chest pain?

  6. Benign Causes • Musculoskeletal • Esophagitis • Bronchitis (Chest Pain secondary to cough) • Recently placed nipple rings • “Non-Specific Chest Pain” * *Most common – means we don’t know, but it is not going to hurt you.

  7. As a general rule any chest pain is ischemic in origin until proven otherwise!

  8. History matters! • Location: Central, left, or right • Associated symptoms: SOB, sweating, nausea • Timing: Gradual or sudden onset • Provocation: What makes worse or better? • Quality: Visceral vs somatic • Radiation: Back, neck, arm • Severity: Scale of 1-10

  9. What are the key parts of the rest of the History?What can you get out of the pt in 4 minutes?

  10. The Rest of the History • Past medical history • Meds – Cardiac meds? Nitro? ASA? Plavix? Coumadin? • Allergies – Always important! • Social – Smoker? Alcoholic? Cocaine? • Family – Sudden Death? Early MI? DVT? PE?

  11. What are the key parts of the Physical?What can you exam in only 2 minutes?

  12. Key Emergency Physical • General Appearance • Vital Signs • Heart (Muffled? Regular? Fast?) • Lungs (Equal? Wet? Tympanitic?) • Neck (JVD?) • Abdomen (Distention?) • LL (Edema? calf tenderness?)

  13. Approach to Chest Pain INITIAL GOAL in ED is to identify life threats • MI, PE, aortic dissection Remember ABCs always first

  14. What do you do in the first 60 seconds?

  15. First 60 seconds • How does the pt look? • What are the pt’s vital signs? • EMS story?

  16. Next 5 minutes?What are 2 bedside tests to consider?What is an important and cheap medication you should consider?

  17. Next 5 Minutes • Brief History • Brief Physical (ABCs) . • What are 2 bedside tests that can be done to help stratify the pt? • EKG • Portable CXR • What is an important and cheap medication you should consider? • ASA (More on this later)

  18. Next 10 Minutes • Patient already stabilized, initial data gathered, and initial orders submitted • Secondary survey: More detailed history and physical exam • Address patient’s pain • Goal now is to categorize patient • Chest wall pain- Musculoskeletal • Pleuritic chest pain- Respiratory • Visceral chest pain- Cardiac

  19. Myocardial ischemia or infarction • Pressure-type of chest pain • Generally involves central to left-sided pain with radiation to jaw or arms • Exacerbated by activity, relieved with rest • Relieved with nitro SUBLINGUAL • Associated with nausea, diaphoresis, syncope, shortness of breath • Enquire about cardiac risk factors: age, sex, smoking history, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, previous myocardial infarction and family history

  20. Work-up • E CG • CXR to look for signs of congestive heart failure • Cardiac enzymes: CK (will begin to rise 6 hours after infarct and remain elevated for 24-48 hours), troponin (will begin to rise 12 hours after infarct and remain elevated for 2 weeks). Need to follow serially if first set negative.

  21. NSTEMI

  22. STEMI

  23. Management Strategy for NSTEMI Initial therapy • Morphine for pain • Oxygen if hypoxic • Nitro spray/drip for pain • Aspirin

  24. Management Strategy for STEMI • Morphine, oxygen, nitro, aspirin • Beta blockers, Ace inhibitors • Early invasive strategy with either thrombolytic therapy or percutaneous coronary intervention (preferred)

  25. Pulmonary Embolus Risk Factors • Hypercoaguability • Malignancy, pregnancy, estrogen use, factor V Leiden, protein C/S deficiency • Venous stasis • Bedrest > 48 hours, recent hospitalization, long distance travel • Venous injury • Recent trauma or surgery

  26. PE Diagnosis • Symptoms • SOB or dyspnea- Present in 90% • Chest pain (pleuritic)- 66% of patients with PE • Cough • Sudden onset • Signs • Tachycardia > 100 beats per minute • Tachypnea > 20 breaths per minute • Hypoxia < 95% on RA (no other cause) • Lower extremity swelling

  27. PE Treatment • IV fluid to maintain blood pressure • Heparin (Will limit propagation but does not dissolve clot) • Unfractionated: 80 u/kg bolus, 18 h/kg/hr • Fractionated (Lovenox): 1 mg/kg SC BID • Fibrinolytics • Consider with large if pt is unstable • No study has shown survival benefit, but very difficult to study. • Alteplase 50–100 mg infused over 2–6 hrs, (bolus in severe shock)

  28. Pneumothorax • Can be asymptomatic or present with acute pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea • Primary pneumothorax predominantly in healthy young tall males • Due to trauma (MVA accidents – associated with rib fractures, iatrogenic – during line placement, thoracentesis) • Increased alveolar pressure from asthma or barotraumas (BiPAP, ventilator-associated) • Rupture of bleb in COPD patients

  29. Pneumothorax • Decreased expansion of chest • Decreased breath sounds and • Decreased tactile/vocal fremitus on side of pneumothorax • Hyperresonant percussion note • Usually easily confirmed by CXR

  30. Needle Decompression

  31. Aortic Dissection • Abrupt onset • The pain usually is described as ripping or tearing • Tearing or ripping pain that is felt in the intrascapular area • New diastolic murmur, asymmetrical pulses, and asymmetrical blood pressure measurements • Risk factors: HTN, Marfan syndrome, coarctation of aorta.. • Widened mediastinum on a portable anteroposterior (AP) radiograph • TEE considered diagnostic test of choice

  32. Aortic Dissection Diagnosis • CXR- Widened mediastinum, abnormal aortic knob, pleural effusions • Not sensitive (25% have wide mediastinums) • Chest CT- Very sensitive and specific • Quickly obtained • Must think about kidney + contrast • Angiography- Gold standard • Most reliable anatomy of dissection • Bedside US – evaluate aorta and look at heart to r/o tampanode.

  33. Aortic Management • Involve CT surgery early • Blood pressure control • Goal SBP 120-130 mmHg • Beta blockers are first line (Labetalol and Esmolol) • Can add vasodilators i.e. nitroprusside • Admission to ICU • Ascending dissections will need surgery • If dissection is only descending, management is only medical

  34. Key Points • Not every chest pain is MI, however every chest pain should be considered as ischemic until proven otherwise • A good history and physical exam may help with the diagnosis • EKG is the best single diagnostic test to help rule out MI

  35. Thank You