What they know and what they think
Download
1 / 35

What they know… and what they think - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 93 Views
  • Uploaded on

What they know… and what they think. The Results of the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the 2009 Attitudes and Behaviors Survey. The Lingo…. A Risk Factor is simply, something in a teens life that increases the potential for them to make an unhealthy choice about their life.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'What they know… and what they think' - jewel


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
What they know and what they think

What they know… and what they think

The Results of the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the 2009 Attitudes and Behaviors Survey


The lingo
The Lingo…

  • A Risk Factor is simply, something in a teens life that increases the potential for them to make an unhealthy choice about their life.

  • A Protective Factor is the opposite; something in a teens life that increases the potential for them to make a healthy choice about their life.

  • Everyone has both risk and protective factors in their life, the goal of the work of the coalition is to increase protective factors and reduce risk factors.


What is the youth risk behavior survey
What is the Youth Risk Behavior Survey?

  • The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is given to students throughout the state of Vermont every two years (at participating schools)

  • The survey measures student perceptions around different types of risky behaviors, including alcohol, tobacco, drugs, sexual behaviors, eating disorders, etc.

  • The survey also measures youth assets (positive attributes) in their lives.


The attitudes and behaviors survey
The Attitudes and Behaviors Survey

  • The Attitudes and Behaviors survey, developed by the Search Institute, measures our teens “assets” and determines how our teens perceive themselves with regards to the 40 Developmental Assets,

  • The A & B Survey looks at both internal and external assets.

    • Internal Assets are about “inner” things, such as personal ethics, motivation, etc., and are usually intrinsic in the values demonstrated.

    • External Assets are around our teens, in their environment and their sphere of influence. These might include infrastructure, signage, community resources, people in their lives, and attitudes. These are areas where community coalitions often have more of an opportunity to provide positive change.


Making sure we re not in a bubble
Making sure we’re not in a bubble

  • Inconsistency in how someone answers a question (or questions) can lead to their responses being eliminated.

  • We don’t JUST use this data to inform how we do stuff. We look at other data sources and use that as well.

  • We try to use qualitative as well as quantitative methods for gaining info. about what is important for our youth and our community.


Why this matters to the coalition
Why this matters to the coalition

  • Looking at data sources helps “drive” the work of the coalition in the direction that is most necessary, i.e., if there is a rising need for interventions around prescription drugs (as reported by our teens) then we can respond appropriately.


The what about alcohol
The What about Alcohol

Percent of students who consumed at least one drink of alcohol during the past 30 days

What’s important about this slide: students are using more as they get older, and data is showing that the usage is going up over time.


More data about alcohol trends
More Data about alcohol trends

Percent of students who binged on alcohol (had five or more drinks of alcohol in a row within a couple of hours) during the past 30 days.

What’s important about this slide: Binge drinking continues to be an issue with 37 percent of students binging.


First consumed prior to age 13 early onset
First consumed prior to age 13 (early onset)

Percents of students who first consume alcohol, other than a few sips, prior to age 13.

What’s important about this slide: One the whole, early onset seems to be on the decline, the outlier being the 8th grade students. This might be something we need to take a look at for the future.


Types of alcohol consumed
Types of Alcohol Consumed

What’s important about this slide: Our teens are changing their consumption patterns towards consuming liquor as opposed to beer or wine.


Where are they getting it
Where are they getting it?

What’s important about this slide: Girls in our community continue to get alcohol from other people, with a secondary source of giving money to someone else to purchase it for them. We should take a look at who those people might be that they are getting it from.


Where are they getting it1
Where are they getting it?

What’s important about this slide: Boys in our community continue to get alcohol from other people, with a secondary source of giving money to someone else to purchase it for them. We should take a look at who those people might be that they are getting it from.


Briefly what this might say
Briefly, what this might say…

  • Alcohol usage, particularly binge drinking is increasing in our community.

  • Teens are getting alcohol predominantly in the home and from other people. This indicates a good way to do some targeted work in Milton.

  • Teens are providing alcohol to each other!

  • What teens are consuming is changing over to hard liquor.

  • Our restaurants and stores don’t seem to be the place where teens are getting their alcohol. Great job store owners!


Tobacco trends
Tobacco Trends

Percent of students who have ever smoked a whole cigarette


More about tobacco
More About Tobacco

Percent of students who smoked cigarettes during the past 30 days

What’s important about this slide: on the whole, smoking continues to trend downward. YAY!


Early onset tobacco
Early Onset - Tobacco

Percent of students who smoked a whole cigarette prior to age 13

What’s important about this slide: Early onset continues to trend downward, although our 8th graders again indicate a higher number than the students in higher grades.


In the same room
In the Same Room

Percent of students who, during the past seven days, were in the same room with someone who was smoking cigarettes.

What’s important about this slide: Consistently, outside of the margin of error, students are reporting increased exposure to secondhand smoke. This is definitely a hot button concern!


Do most high school students smoke
Do most High School students smoke?

Percent of students who think most high school students smoke cigarettes (55%+)

What’s important about this slide: On the whole, our students indicate that they don’t think that most of their peers are smoking.


What this might mean
What this might mean…

  • Tobacco is on the decline in most grades and overall in Milton, this is great news!

  • YIKES!!! Second hand smoke is dramatically higher than it’s been in the past. This is huge!

  • Kids are still being exposed at a young age to smoking and cigarette use.

  • It’s nice to see that on the whole, students see that most of their peers are not smoking.


The other drugs
The “Other” Drugs

  • Some things to consider

    • Marijuana, because of it’s prevalence is separated out from some other types of drugs

    • Prescription Drug use/abuse is in here this year! In 2007, the YRBS asked about prescription pain relievers and stimulants in one question. They were separated out this year.


Marijuana early onset
Marijuana – Early Onset

Percent of students who used marijuana prior to the age of 13.

What’s important about this slide: Early onset of marijuana usage is reducing (again, other than the 8th grade students) and the numbers continue to be low for early onset with marijuana usage.


Marijuana ever used
Marijuana – Ever Used

Percent of students who used marijuana one or more times during the past 30 days

What’s important about this slide: Marijuana usage continues to be an issue for our teens, with other half of our seniors reporting having used it before.


Marijuana use past 30 days
Marijuana Use past 30 Days

Percent of students who used marijuana one or more times during the past 30 days

What’s important about this slide: Some of our teens are using marijuana, and there doesn’t seem to be a specific trend from grade to grade in this area.


Prescription drug use 2009
Prescription Drug use - 2009

What’s important about this slide: Prescription drug use is something that is happening in our community, and there seems to be more usage of pain relievers than stimulants.

Blue = Percent of students who have ever used a prescription stimulant, such at Ritalin or Adderall, not prescribed to them.

Green = Percent of students who have ever used a prescription pain reliever, such as Oxycontin, Vicodin, or other prescription pain killer, not prescribed to them.



What this could mean to us
What this could mean to us…

  • Prescription drug use is becoming something to know more about and our community has an opportunity to address this issue in a timely way.

  • “Harder” drugs continue to be on the very fringes of our population

  • Marijuana is STILL one of our largest issues. Teens are using it, regularly and it’s also regularly available.


What the a b survey shows us
What the A&B Survey shows us…

  • Some things to keep in mind

    • This survey was given to our CURRENT 7th-12th graders (then 6th-11th graders)

    • Total sample was 597.

  • This survey indicates both thriving (or protective) and risk factors (yup, that lingo again!) as well as other areas.


The high points
The High Points

  • 73% of our students indicate that their family life provides a high level of love and support

  • 72% of our students indicate that their best friends model responsible behavior

  • 67% of our students indicate that they are out 2 or fewer nights a week with friends with “nothing special to do.”

  • 71% of our students indicate that they act on their convictions and stand up for his or her beliefs

  • 72% say they tell the truth, even when it’s not easy.


Middle of the road
Middle of the Road…

  • 52% of students indicate that they care about his or her school.

  • 52% of students indicated that they place a high value on helping other people.

  • 54% of students indicated that they place a high value on promoting equality and reducing hunger and poverty.

  • 48% of students indicated that it is important to not be sexually active or to use alcohol or other drugs.

  • 48% of our students indicate having a high self-esteem.

  • 45% of our students indicate that they can resist negative peer pressure and dangerous situations.

  • 49% of our students indicate that they receive support from three or more nonparent adults.

  • 55% of students indicate that they feel safe at home, school and in the neighborhood.

  • 53% of students indicate that school provides clear rules and consequences.

  • 53% of students indicate that their neighbors take responsibility for monitoring young people’s behavior.


Hot button issues
Hot Button Issues…

  • 15% of our students indicated that they spend 3 or more hours per week in lessons or practice in music, theater or other arts.

  • 24% of students indicated that their parents and other adults model positive, responsible behavior.

  • 29% of students indicated that they spend one or more hours/week in activities in a religious institution.

  • 27% of students indicate that they read for pleasure three or more hours per week.

  • 29% of students indicated that they know how to plan ahead and make choices.


The assets of our youth 2007
The Assets of our Youth – 2007

What’s important about this slide: Our youth average assets are 18.9 for 2007. This is out of 40 assets that are indicated as important for youth to succeed in life.


The assets of our youth 2009
The Assets of our Youth - 2009

What’s important about this slide: Our youth average assets are 19.4 for 2009. This is out of 40 assets that are indicated as important for youth to succeed in life. What’s exciting is that it looks like our teens assets are trending upwards!


Assets by grouping 2007
Assets by Grouping - 2007

What’s important about this slide: This breaks out the assets by group. Notice the in 2007, the largest number of students fell into the 10-20 and 20-30 brackets.


Assets by grouping 2009
Assets by Grouping - 2009

What’s important about this slide: This breaks out the assets by group. This shows that our teens are moving up over time as the bottom group is smallest, second group is larger, third is smaller and fourth is larger.


What now
What now?

  • We can create recommendations about how to build assets in our community and for our teens based on the results of their feedback.

  • Ask a coalition staff member to attend a meeting of your club or organization to “spread the wealth” of what our teens are saying.

  • Determine what YOU can do to make a difference for Milton.


ad