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INTRODUCTION TO NONBIASED ASSESSMENT OF MULTICULTURAL STUDENTS WITH LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT PowerPoint Presentation
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INTRODUCTION TO NONBIASED ASSESSMENT OF MULTICULTURAL STUDENTS WITH LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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INTRODUCTION TO NONBIASED ASSESSMENT OF MULTICULTURAL STUDENTS WITH LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT. I. DIAGNOSTIC PIE**. Language is a system of symbols used to represent concepts formed through exposure and experience Students’ experiences may differ from mainstream school expectations

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i diagnostic pie
I. DIAGNOSTIC PIE**
  • Language is a system of symbols used to represent concepts formed through exposure and experience
  • Students’ experiences may differ from mainstream school expectations
  • If teachers refer ELL students for testing, there may be a difference, not disorder, because of experiential differences
  • LI=disorder in both L1 and English!!
4 quadrants in the diagnostic pie
4 quadrants in the “Diagnostic Pie”**
  • Quadrant 1==normal ability, adequate background
  • Quadrant 2==normal ability, limitations of linguistic experience, environmental exposure
  • Quadrant 3==LI, adequate background
  • Quadrant 4==LI limitations of linguistic experience, environmental exposure
iii legislation idea 2004
III. LEGISLATION: IDEA 2004**
  • We must evaluate in a nondiscriminatory manner
  • Tests must be administered in most proficient communication mode
  • Testing cannot reflect limited English; must reflect child’s ability in area tested
slide8
The IDEA does not require that standardized measures are used**
  • Traditionally, many special educators have used standardized tests because they believe that a quantitative score is mandated by federal law; however, the law does not exclude subjective or qualitative measures. It leaves the choice of measurement tools and criteria to the educator.
iv pre evaluation process
IV. PRE-EVALUATION PROCESS**
  • Before doing formal testing, it is extremely important to carry out the following:
    • 1. Language proficiency testing
    • 2. Ethnographic interviewing and case history
    • 3. Teacher evaluation of student’s classroom performance
language proficiency testing
Language Proficiency Testing**
  • Primary language?
  • Dominant language?
  • Interview parents, teachers, interpreters who have worked with the student
youtube video
Youtube video: **
  • Channel Celeste Roseberry
  • Assessment of ELLs with Language Impairment: Gathering Case History Through Interviews
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2myRI8XZ0g
v testing in the primary language
V. TESTING IN THE PRIMARY LANGUAGE**
  • Problem: great heterogeneity within languages (dialects)
  • Problem: Limited data on normal development in other languages
  • Problem: Differences in vocabulary and linguistic knowledge bases of students who immigrate vs. those born and raised in U.S.
vi selecting assessment instruments
VI. SELECTING ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENTS
  • A. Appropriateness of Test Content
slide20
B. Adequacy of norms
  • C. Possible Examiner Bias
f possible value bias
F. Possible Value Bias**
  • Example: Test of Problem-Solving Skills-Revised—”What should she do now?”
  • Preschool Language Scale—”Why do you brush your teeth?” African American children in some communities “Because my momma told me to.” (scored as incorrect; correct answer is “because you get cavities if you don’t”)
vii nonbiased assessment considerations in standardized testing
VII. NONBIASED ASSESSMENT: CONSIDERATIONS IN STANDARDIZED TESTING**
  • A. Introduction
  • Standardized, formal tests are commonly used with ELL students
  • Many speech-language pathologists and other special educators operate from the belief that we must always obtain quantitative data such as percentile ranks and standard deviations
  • However, the IDEA permits the use of qualitative, subjective measures which we will discuss more in the next section
slide26

**The Native Americans have a saying: When you are riding a horse and it dies, dismount--and find a new one. But many of us keep wanting to revive the old horse of standardized testing with ELL students.

b pitfalls of using standardized tests with ell students formal test assumptions
B. Pitfalls of using Standardized Tests with ELL Students—Formal Test Assumptions**
  • There are very few standardized tests in most languages
  • Most standardized tests are developed from a Western, literate, middle class framework
bias in standardized testing potentially unfamiliar items
Bias in Standardized Testing: Potentially Unfamiliar Items**
  • Household objects
  • Vehicles
  • Sports
  • Musical instruments
  • Types of clothing
  • Professions/occupations
  • Historically related events and people
  • Foods
  • American nursery rhymes
  • Geography
  • Games
slide37

Give the student extra time to respond**

  • If the student gives a “wrong” answer, ask her to explain it and record her explanation; score it as correct if it would be correct in her culture
  • Repeat items when necessary
i will often have 2 columns
I will often have 2 columns: **
  • First attempt Second attempt
    • - +
    • - +
    • - -
    • - +
    • - --
    • -- +
what i don t want to see
What I don’t want to see: **
  • First attempt Second attempt
    • - -
    • - -
    • - -
    • - -
    • - -
ix considerations in test interpretation
IX. CONSIDERATIONS IN TEST INTERPRETATION**

Don’t identify a student based solely on formal test scores

Ascertain if the student’s errors are typical of other students with similar backgrounds

Interpret overall results as a team

In assessment reports, include disclaimers about departure from standard testing procedures

x interpreting test results
X. INTERPRETING TEST RESULTS**
  • Always do this as a team
  • In your diagnostic report, be SURE to describe how you altered administration of tests
  • Review results with family members and others from the culture—are these results typical?