teaching children with visual impairments in physical education lauren j lieberman ph d
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Teaching Children with Visual Impairments in Physical Education Lauren J. Lieberman Ph.D. Sponsored by:. AAPAR is an Association of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. My background. Undergraduate at West Chester University in H & PE & APE

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teaching children with visual impairments in physical education lauren j lieberman ph d

Teaching Children with Visual Impairments in Physical EducationLauren J. Lieberman Ph.D.

Sponsored by:

AAPAR is an Association of the American Alliance for Health,

Physical Education, Recreation and Dance

my background
My background
  • Undergraduate at West Chester University in H & PE & APE
  • Masters at University of Wisconsin at LaCrosse in Special Physical Education
  • Ph.D. at Oregon State University in Movement Studies in Disability
  • Taught and coached at Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, MA

5. Currently teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in APE at the College at Brockport

6. Founder and Director of Camp Abilities

7. Extensive research and five books in this area

8. Consult with American Printing House for the Blind & NY State Deaf-Blind Collaborative

overview of presentation
Overview of Presentation
  • Types of Visual Impairments
  • General Instructional Strategies
  • Guide running techniques
  • Resources
  • Blind Sports
  • Role Models
types of visual impairments
Types of Visual Impairments
  • Acuity loss-Retinopathy of Prematurity
  • Field loss-Retinitis Pigmentosa
  • Far sighted
  • Near sighted
  • Intermittent vision-Cortical Visual Impairment
  • Other
slide6
Diagram of the EYE

Macula

http://www.nei.nih.gov/health/eyediagram/

slide9
Macular Degeneration - The deterioration of the macula, the central area of the retina, is the most prevalent eye disease. This picture shows the area of decreased central vision called a central scotoma. The peripheral or side vision remains unaffected so mobility need not be impaired.
slide10
Macular Degeneration

The deterioration of the macula, the central area of the retina, is the most prevalent eye disease.

Hemianopia

Damage to the optic pathways in the brain, can cause vision loss in half of the field.

slide11
Hemianopia-

Damage to the optic pathways in the brain, which can result

from acquired brain injuries due to stroke, tumor or trauma,

can cause vision loss in half of the field. The most common

defect, right homonymous hemianopia, occurs in corresponding

halves of the right field of vision.

slide12
Glaucoma

Damage to the optic nerve caused by high eye pressure.

Optic nerve sends messages about what we see from the eye to the brain.

If not treated, damage increases, causing a loss of peripheral (side) vision. Without treatment, may eventually lead to blindness.

slide13
Retinitis Pigmentosa

Congenital degeneration of the pigmented layer of the retina that leads to a severe loss of peripheral vision. Even though central vision may remain clear, traveling is difficult because of side vision loss. There are also issues with night vision.

slide14
What you need to know
  • What they can see
  • Previous experience
  • Learning style
    • Tactile modeling
    • Physical guidance
  • Additional disabilities
  • Other?
curricular considerations
Curricular Considerations
  • Open & Closed Sports
  • Modify activities as necessary
  • Infuse closed sports:
    • Track & field
    • Swimming
    • Biking
    • Archery
    • Bowling
adapting activities continued
Adapting Activities Continued..
  • Adapting rules
    • more time
    • no defender
    • slower the pace
    • change objective
    • change rules
    • sighted guide
    • touch/sound cues
    • other
adapting equipment
Adapting Equipment
  • Sound balls
  • Lighter balls
  • Heavier balls
  • Textured balls
  • Auditory targets
  • Guidewire to bases or around boundaries
  • Tactile markers on oars, treadmills, weight machines
  • Other
train support personnel
Train Support Personnel
  • Train peer tutors
  • Train paraeducators
  • Utilize teachers of the visually impaired, orientation and mobility instructors, and adapted physical educators
guide running techniques
Guide running techniques
  • See
  • http://www.campabilitiesbrockport.org/Teaching.htm
instructional strategies
Instructional Strategies
  • Physical Guidance and Tactile Modeling
  • See
  • http://www.campabilitiesbrockport.org/Teaching/tactile.htm
  • http://www.campabilitiesbrockport.org/Teaching/physical-guidance.htm
infuse blind sports into the curriculum
Infuse Blind Sports into the Curriculum
  • Goal ball
  • http://www.campabilitiesbrockport.org/Teaching/goalball-ncpad.htm
  • Beep baseball
  • http://www.campabilitiesbrockport.org/Teaching.htm
blind sports
Blind Sports

Goal Ball

Beep Baseball

slide23
Resources
  • APH.org
    • Click on PE web site
    • Click on products
      • Books
      • Sound sources
      • Auditory balls
      • Walk/run for fitness kit
      • Jump rope kit
      • & more!
  • www.campabilities.org
  • www.usaba.org
  • www.perkins.org
  • www.twu.edu./INSPIRE
  • Texas school for the blind
  • other
slide24
Marla Runyan

*Is legally blind, diagnosed with Stargardt’s Disease as a child, has been legally blind for 20 years

*First person that is legally blind to earn a sport on the U.S. Olympic team

*Former Olympic Distance Runner 1999 - 2006

*Motivational Speaker 2000 - present

*Communicative Disorders Specialist 2008 - present

career highlights
Career Highlights

•2-Time U.S. Olympian, 2000 and 2004 (1500m and 5000m)

•Olympic Finalist, 8th place finish 1500 meters 2000 Olympic Games

•Pan-American Games Gold Medalist, 1500m (1999)

•3-Time Outdoor Track National Champion, 5000m (2001 – 2003)

•3-Time Road 5k National Champion, (2002-2004)

•Former American Record holder, Indoor 5000m 15:07.33

•2002 NYC Marathon, 4th Place, Top American 2:27.10

•2003 Boston Marathon, 5th Place, Top American 2:30.33

•2004 Chicago Marathon, 7th Place, Top American 2:28.33

•2006 Twin Cities Marathon Champion, National Champion 2:32.17

slide26
Has a book

*No Finish Line, My Life as I see it

Although there are not many commercials that include people with disabilities, Nike did make one about Marla

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0nM8cvwWsg

erik weihenmayer
Erik Weihenmayer
  • http://www.touchthetop.com/education/seven-summits/mount-everest/
  • An accomplished climber, Erik Weihenmayer became the only blind man in history to reach the summit of the world's highest peak - Mount Everest on May 25, 2001. On August 20, 2008, when he stood on top of Carstensz Pyramid, the tallest peak in Austral-Asia, Weihenmayer completed his quest to climb the Seven Summits - the highest peak on every continent. (learn more about Erik Weihenmayer the world class adventurer)
other role models
Other role models
  • 2008 ParalympicWomens Goal Ball gold medalists
  • Triscia Zorn-Swimmer with a visual impairment-won most medals of any Olympian or Paralympian
  • Tim Willis-Paralympic runner
  • Jessie Lorenz-Paralympic Goal ball player & marathon runner
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