design of robotic heads for use in assistive robotics dan ricks n.
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Design of Robotic Heads for Use in Assistive Robotics Dan Ricks. Outline. What Do Robots Look Like? Current Robots Used in Autism Research What Should Robots Look Like? Input. HRI Robot Classifications. Machine. Realistic. Mascot. The Uncanny Valley. Current Humanoid Autism Robots.

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Design of Robotic Heads for Use in Assistive Robotics Dan Ricks


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Presentation Transcript
outline
Outline
  • What Do Robots Look Like?
  • Current Robots Used in Autism Research
  • What Should Robots Look Like?
  • Input
hri robot classifications
HRI Robot Classifications

Machine

Realistic

Mascot

current humanoid autism robots
Current Humanoid Autism Robots

Robota

Kaspar

Infanoid

Keepon

FACE

how they chose their robots
How They Chose Their Robots…
  • Infanoid (Koyoto and Nagoya Universities) – The robot was built to show emotion, but little effort was put into covering the mechanical parts.
  • Keepon (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Japan) – Tried to make it as simple as physically possible to avoid distractions.
  • FACE (University of Pisa, Italy) – Used to teach the intricacies of human emotion, and so a very lifelike head was built.
  • Robota (University of Hertfordshire) - Used limbs, head, and clothes from a doll.
  • Kaspar (University of Hertfordshire) - After doing the study with Robota, they tried to make a robot that balanced looking human as well as being simple and plain. They used a CPR dummy mask for face.
does appearance matter case 1 theatrical robot
Does Appearance Matter?Case 1: Theatrical Robot

Actor in Robot Costume

Actor in Normal Clothes

Touch

Gaze

Near

does appearance matter case 2 robota
Does Appearance Matter?Case 2: Robota

Robota in Doll Clothes

Robota in Plain Clothes

Andy

Don

Billy

current therapies they do
Current Therapies They Do
  • Act as the object of joint attention.
  • Perform imitation activities.
  • Play turn-taking games.
  • Practice eye contact.
  • Used as a toy in unstructured playtime.
  • Enact and teach appropriate behavior in social situations.
  • Make a facial emotion and have the child label it or match it to a picture of a human making that same face.
  • Tell the child a social situation and have the child pick an emotion for the robot.
how can we tell if they re interested
How Can We Tell if They’re Interested?
  • Ask Them
  • Observationally Based
  • Physiological Feedback
observation based
Observation Based
  • Put the child in a room with the robot performing some routine.
  • Videotape and measure:
    • Eye Gaze
    • Touch
    • Imitation
    • Proximity
physiological feedback
Physiological Feedback
  • Have the child wear a BioPac system.
  • The child plays rigged games.
  • A parent and a therapist identify whether a child likes the game, is bored, or anxious.
  • Researchers associate these emotions with their physiological levels.
  • Now the computer can automatically label their emotional states. The computer and therapist agree 81% of the time.

This study was performed by the Marino Autism Research Institute in conjunction with Vanderbilt University

input
Input
  • What abilities should the face have?
    • Ekman Faces
    • Happy vs. Unhappy
  • Which faces would be appropriate?
  • Should we/how can we, test to see if they are appropriate?