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Planning and Evaluating Physical Activity Experiences
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  1. Planning and EvaluatingPhysical Activity Experiences Specification: Planning and/or evaluating physical activity programmes/experiences drawing upon knowledge underpinning achievement standards 90739 and 90740. (PE 3.1 & PE 3.2) Natasha Low

  2. Outdoor Experience Content • Purposes of OE – needs – of individual and group • Hauora and OE experiences • Benefits of OE experiences • Problems/concerns associated with OE experiences within schools • Nature of Risk • Safety vs Risk vs Challenge • Planning for OE • Safety Management Systems - “Safety and EOTC- A good practice guide for NZ Schools” #1 • Risk Management Planning Tools- SAPs / RAMS / Rainbow System (WaterSafe Guidelines for Schools #2) • Crisis Management • Evaluating OE experiences • Own experiential knowledge

  3. Outdoor Experience Court Room Battle Scenario Focus statement

  4. Examples in NZ Tihoi Venture School(St Paul's Collegiate School)

  5. Examples in NZ Tihoi Venture School www.stpauls.school.nz/main.cfm?id=60 • Year 10 from St Paul's Collegiate School (Hamilton) • 5 month residential programme • Experiential Education combining Social, Outdoor and Academic Studies MISSION STATEMENT"In this unique and challenging environment, through the medium of community living, a quality academic programme and wide ranging outdoor pursuits we aim to provide the best possible opportunities to promote the personal and social development of our students." Reading provided on the wiki: http://peandhealth.wikispaces.com/Physical+Education

  6. Examples in NZ Kahunui (St Cuthbert’s College) www.stcuthberts.school.nz/files/special.asp?MenuID=15&PageID=654

  7. Examples in NZ Kahunui (remote campus) www.stcuthberts.school.nz/files/special.asp?MenuID=15&PageID=654 • Year 10 from St Cuthbert’s College • 4 weeks, live-in supportive community • Remote campus, Kahunui in the Bay of Plenty • Based on the concept of learning through experience. Aims To advance student’s academic and social development, and to help them develop greater levels of physical, emotional and intellectual fitness.

  8. For each debate Divide into 3 groups (max 5 per group): the plus group; the minus group; the judge and jury. Each group has a role to play.

  9. Introduction • Keywords • Relevant content • Hard facts ?? • Background – own experiences this year

  10. Relevant OE Content • Purposes of OE – needs – of individual and group • Hauora and OE experiences • Benefits of OE experiences • Problems/concerns associated with OE experiences within schools • Nature of Risk • Safety vs Risk vs Challenge • Planning for OE • Safety Management Systems - “Safety and EOTC- A good practice guide for NZ Schools” • Risk Management Planning Tools- SAPs / RAMS / Rainbow System (WaterSafe Guidelines for Schools) • Crisis Management • Evaluating OE experiences • Own experiential knowledge

  11. Court Room Battle

  12. Court Room Battle

  13. Debate Guidelines • Justify judgements with reasons • Active listening We are here to learn from each other • Take turns to speak

  14. After the debate Group discussion In your group: • Examine bias • Challenge assumptions • Identify omissions Add to your group’s sheet

  15. Review sheets • Add ideas if desired

  16. Suggestions • Initiatives • New Ideas • Alternatives • Ways forward Write on strips of paper • Present Stick to main sheet

  17. Conclusion • Reflect • 1-2 main points from the debate Write on strips of paper • Present Stick to main sheet

  18. Reference #1 “Safety and EOTC- A good practice guide for NZ Schools” www.tki.org.nz/r/eotc/resources/ safety_e.php

  19. Reference #2 WaterSafe Guidelines for Schools www.watersafe.org.nz Rainbow system of supervision

  20. The following slides contain content relating to this topic. They are not intended as part of a power point presentation.

  21. Related organisations • Mountain Safety Council http://www.mountainsafety.org.nz/ Resources, Public Courses • NZ Outdoor Instructors Association http://www.nzoia.org.nz/ Resources, Instructor Training Courses

  22. Further reading • Outdoor Education Health & Physical Education NZ Curriculum, p46-47 • Curriculum links on camp - School camps are the perfect vehicle for the key competencies, Thorndon School teachers found earlier this year. • Striding towards success - EOTC has helped a low-decile secondary school keep more students on the path to success Education Gazette 30 June 2008, p7-9

  23. Nature of risk vs types of risk Nature of Risk • Risk The potential to lose something of value. The loss may be physical, mental, social or financial. The presence of risk creates uncertainty. • Types of Risk Absolute Risk Residual/Real Risk Perceived Risk The examiners report 2006: For Question 2 on Outdoor Experiences, candidates who did NOT achieve scholarship... Lacked ability to comment on aspects of risk and did not always distinguish between the nature of risk or types of risk • The marking schedule Scholarship 2004, Q2: Candidates should “explain or offer an interpretation of the nature • of risk”. Can consider in the critique: definitions of risk and its relationship of risk to other concepts such as • danger, accident, adventure, safety and challenge; Types of risk.

  24. Possible content focuses & contexts • Risk & Crisis Management e.g. - Extreme surf skier - Tasman Crossing kayakers • Prevention of risk • Emergency Procedures

  25. Risk & Crisis Management Possible content focuses & contexts - Extreme surf skier Surf skier Paul Wilford loves wild weather 12 Aug 2008 .. he insists that despite a number of paddlers getting into trouble recently, the sport is safe, and paddlers know what they are doing. http://www.3news.co.nz/TVShows/CampbellLive/VideoArchive 12th August 2008

  26. Risk & Crisis Management - Tasman Crossing kayakers Possible content focuses & contexts Australia to New Zealand by Kayak On November 13 2007 James, Justin and Lot 41 departed Forster, Australia. 62 days later they arrived in New Plymouth New Zealand. They had kayaked 3318km, braved 10 metre swells, faced howling winds of over 50 knots, endured severe food and sleep deprivation.. http://www.crossingtheditch.com.au/expedition/

  27. Possible content focuses & contexts – further information to examine & for breath of knowledge Trans-Tasman kayak trip abandoned December 06, 2006 ADVENTURER Andrew McAuley has been forced by cold weather to abandon his bid to become the first person to kayak from Australia to New Zealand. The trans-Tasman journey has been unsuccessfully attempted twice by other kayakers. The Australian www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,20882231-29277,00.html

  28. 'Crazy night' for kayak adventurersDecember 19, 2007 A "crazy, horrible night" is how one of two Australian kayakers has described the hours they spent floundering in the Tasman Sea while powerful waves and 30-knot winds hammered their disabled kayak. See Slideshow: Kayak across the Tasman The Sydney Morning Herald http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/crazy-night-for-kayak-adventurers/2007/12/19/1197740362303.html

  29. …hope theirs will be the first successful attempt by kayakers to cross the Tasman Sea after a series of failed bids. The most tragic bid occurred in February, when 39-year-old Australian Andrew McAuley died. (see article from 2006 – same guy)

  30. Australia to New Zealand by Kayak http://www.crossingtheditch.com.au/expedition/ On November 13 2007 James, Justin and Lot 41 departed Forster, Australia. 62 days later they arrived in New Plymouth New Zealand. They had kayaked 3318km, braved 10 metre swells, faced howling winds of over 50 knots, endured severe food and sleep deprivation, wasting muscles and adverse winds and currents to become the first kayak expedition across the Tasman Sea as well as become the longest trans oceanic kayaking expedition undertaken by two expeditioners. Find out how they did this incredible feat!!

  31. Australia to New Zealand by Kayak http://www.crossingtheditch.com.au/expedition/ PLANNING THE MOST CRITICAL PART OF ANY EXPEDITION, PROPER PLANNING IS THE BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS. CROSSING THE DITCH TOOK 62 DAYS. THE PREPARATION TOOK OVER 3 YEARS. MORE RISK MANAGEMENT REAL TIME DECISION SUPPORT, HEAVY WEATHER MANAGEMENT, CRISIS PLANS…GET O THE HEART OF WHAT IT TAKES TO WIN. MORE TRAINING CROSSING THE DITCH WAS GOING TO PUSH JAMES AND JUSTIN TO THE VERY LIMIT. TRAINING THEIR BODIES AND MINDS TO BE CAPABLE OF SUCH A FEAT WAS CRITICAL. MORE TECHNOLOGY LIVE GLOBAL TRACKING, COMMUNICATIONS, ELECTRIC SYSTEMS…CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY ON BOARD LOT 41. MORE

  32. Surf skier Paul Wilford loves wild weather Campbell Live 12 Aug 2008See video footage: www.3news.co.nz/TVShows/CampbellLive/VideoArchive/tabid/67/ • While most of us spend the winter months trying to stay as warm and dry as humanly possible, others are champing at the bit to get their outdoor fix. • For surf ski rider Paul Wilford his motto is rather simple: the wilder the weather, the better. • And he insists that despite a number of paddlers getting into trouble recently, the sport is safe, and paddlers know what they are doing. • Paul lives in Auckland, the perfect play ground for water lovers; he goes out training most days.  • So we jumped on a boat this morning to put Paul through his paces. • We were driving at eight and a half knots, which is about 16 kilometres an hour. And Paul was keeping up no probs. • Paul is one of a few kiwis who travel the surf-ski circuit, but the local scene is getting bigger as the boats become more affordable. • His 17 kilo kayak cost him $2500. • On a calm day, it is rather mesmerising watching Paul glide through the water. He makes it look easy, graceful even. • But for Paul this is boring.  He is one of the few people who believe the stormier the weather the better.  He will deliberately go to sea in the worst possible conditions. • The serious dangers of this sport were brought home last month when Bay of Plenty canoeist James Moore, also an extreme weather canoeist, lost his life in some of this winters worst storms. • Paul heads to Perth in January to compete in the Surf Ski World Cup.

  33. Further OE Content 5 stages of safety management 1. Initial planning & approval; 2. Preparation for EOTC (people and programme management); 3. Pre-event planning checkpoint; 4. Running the event; 5. Post-event review and evaluation “Safety and EOTC- A good practice guide for NZ Schools” http://www.tki.org.nz/r/eotc/resources/safety_e.php#1

  34. Further OE Content Risk Management Planning process • Assess the risk (What could go wrong?) • Causal Factors (Hazards) People Equipment Environment • Strategies to Prevent Things Going Wrong • Emergency Procedures

  35. Further OE Content Risk Management Strategies 1. Eliminate risk if possible 2. Isolate risk if you can’t eliminate it 3. Minimise risk if you can’t isolate it 4. Cancel activity if you can’t minimise the risk (Ministry of Education, 2002. pg 69) Rainbow System of Supervision Resources www.watersafe.org.nz

  36. Hauora and OE experiences