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Introduction Rules and procedures Meetings Following the work Phased approach, Releases PowerPoint Presentation
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Introduction Rules and procedures Meetings Following the work Phased approach, Releases

Introduction Rules and procedures Meetings Following the work Phased approach, Releases

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Introduction Rules and procedures Meetings Following the work Phased approach, Releases

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  1. 3GPP – OMA WorkshopFrankfurt, 15 September 2003A Phased Approach to StandardizationJohn M Meredith3GPP Specifications ManagerETSI Mobile Competence Centre(john.meredith@etsi.org)

  2. Introduction • Rules and procedures • Meetings • Following the work • Phased approach, Releases • Project management, the Work Plan • Specs: drafting, maintaining, …

  3. Introduction • Rules and procedures • Meetings • Following the work • Phased approach, Releases • Project management, the Work Plan • Specs: drafting, maintaining, …

  4. IMT-2000 Family GPRS GSM W-CDMA DS FDD 3.84 Mcps TDD 1.28 Mcps (aka: TD-SCDMA) TC EDGE SC Paths from other technologies, e.g. IS-136, PDC… The paths to 3GPP technologies Voice & low-speed data Voice & medium-speed data Voice & high-speed data Circuit Switched Packet Switched IP (option)

  5. Rel '98 Rel '99 Rel-4 Phase 1 Phase 2 Rel '96 Rel '97 Rel-5 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 Evolution from GSM to 3G GSM UMTS GPRS EDGE 2003

  6. Introduction • Rules and procedures • Meetings • Following the work • Phased approach, Releases • Project management, the Work Plan • Specs: drafting, maintaining, …

  7. Rules and procedures (1) 3GPP operates according to the following rules and guidelines based upon the Collaborative Agreement http://www.3gpp.org/About/3gppagre.pdf as follows: The Working Procedures http://www.3gpp.org/About/WP.htm TSG working methodshttp://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/21900.htm Spec drafting rules http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/21801.htm

  8. Rules and procedures (2) The Working Procedures http://www.3gpp.org/About/WP.htm These cover procedural issues such as holding meetings, electing officials, participation rights, IPR policy, and so on. The Working Procedures are the top level of rules, and apply to all groups working under the banner of 3GPP from PCG downwards. If you have a question on rules and procedures, look here first.

  9. Rules and procedures (3) TSG working methodshttp://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/21900.htm TR 21.900 gives detailed procedural guidance on the creation of new specifications and their management (drafting, change control, filenames, etc.). It also covers the creation and management of work items, and gives further guidance on the running of TSGs and their WGs (e-mail exploders, e-mail decision making, etc.).

  10. Rules and procedures (4) Spec drafting rules http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/21801.htm Based on rules originally developed within ISO and long since adapted for use in most other international and national standardization bodies, TR 21.801 provides detailed instructions on the creation and modification of TSs and TRs. It covers both general guidance (e.g. the use of modal auxiliary verbs) and specific conventions (which word processor styles to use for different purposes). It also includes a list of permissible software tools (word processor, SDL chart generator, TTCN tool, graphics software, etc.).

  11. Introduction • Rules and procedures • Meetings • Following the work • Phased approach, Releases • Project management, the Work Plan • Specs: drafting, maintaining, …

  12. Where does the work get done? http://www.3gpp.org/TB/home.htm

  13. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TSG and WG meetings (1) http://www.3gpp.org/Meetings/meetings.htm

  14. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TSG and WG meetings (2)

  15. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TSG and WG meetings (3)

  16. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TSG and WG meetings (4)

  17. Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TSG and WG meetings (5)

  18. TSG and WG meetings (6) The calendar of future 3GPP meetings can be found on the web at http://www.3gpp.org/Meetings/meetings.htm

  19. TSG and WG meetings (7) Information on past 3GPP meetings can be found on the web at http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/PlenaryMeetings.htm

  20. Introduction • Rules and procedures • Meetings • Following the work • Phased approach, Releases • Project management, the Work Plan • Specs: drafting, maintaining, …

  21. How do I follow what is happening where? Help!! The guiding principles of 3GPP are openness and ease of access to the results. The following slides show the means by which those principles are upheld, so that the whole community of subscribers / users, network operators, equipment manufacturers, and national administrators can benefit from the fruits of 3GPP’s labours, whether or not they have been active participants. All information is publicly available on the 3GPP web site http://www.3gpp.org/ .

  22. Following the work (1) Each TSG and each Working Group have declared terms of reference. This makes it relatively easy to determine which group you need to follow if you are interested in a particular area of work. http://www.3gpp.org/TB/home.htm Every TSG and every WG has an e-mail exploder. In most cases, anybody can join the exploder(s) in which he has an interest. There is no restriction to representatives of 3GPP Individual Members, to active participants, etc – anybody can join. http://www.3gpp.org/email/lists.htm The meeting calendar for all groups is set well in advance. Increasingly, registration of intended participation in meetings can be done on-line. http://www.3gpp.org/Meetings/meetings.htm#calendar.

  23. Following the work (2) All meeting documents – invitation, agenda, contributions (so called “temporary documents”), meeting report, etc – are available on the file server, and remain there indefinitely. All TSGs and WGs use a standardized file naming convention. From the file name, you can determine the originating TSG or WG the year in which the document was created, and via the table at:http://www.3gpp.org/ftp/Specs/html-info/PlenaryMeetings.htm the meeting number* at which it was presented.You can thus easily get to a given document of interest. * At the time of writing, this table only covers plenary TSG meetings. It is hoped to expand it to cover WGs in due course..

  24. Following the work (3) The agreed work plan is published after every TSG SA meeting, and forms the basis for the programme for the next three months. (More details on the management of the work plan are given later in this presentation.) http://www.3gpp.org/Management/WorkPlan.htm The specifications resulting from the Working Groups’ activities are available on the file server, and can be downloaded individually or en masse. For a given spec, you can also track the change history from version to version. (More details on how to find the spec which interests you are given later in this presentation.) http://www.3gpp.org/specs/numbering.htm

  25. Following the work (4) If, after all that, you still cannot find the information you need ... The contact coordinates of all TSG and WG officials (Chairmen, Vice-Chairmen, Secretaries) are available, as are those of the Support Team. http://www.3gpp.org/tb/officials.htm http://www.3gpp.org/Support/MCC_photos.htm

  26. Introduction • Rules and procedures • Meetings • Following the work • Phased approach, Releases • Project management, the Work Plan • Specs: drafting, maintaining, …

  27. 3GPP Releases (1) Specifications are grouped into “Releases” A mobile system can be constructed based on the set of all specifications which comprise a given Release. A Release differs from the previous Release by having added functionality introduced as a result of ongoing standardization work. http://www.3gpp.org/specs/releases.htm

  28. 3GPP Releases (2) A 3GPP system definition consists of all the technical specifications of a given “Release”. Together, these specifications define a set of features provided by the system.

  29. Release N 3GPP Releases (3) A new Release consists of the features of the old Release augmented with additional features of the new Release: Feature X Feature Y Release N+1 Feature Z

  30. Introduction • Rules and procedures • Meetings • Following the work • Phased approach, Releases • Project management, the Work Plan • Specs: drafting, maintaining, …

  31. Feature 1 spec Feature 2 spec Feature 3 spec Project Management (1) Traditional systems analysis and project management techniques break the idea down into progressively more manageable elements. Until it is possible to identify individual component specifications.

  32. Feature 1 spec Project Management (2) To be adopted onto the work programme of 3GPP, each feature must have the support of at least four 3GPP individual member organizations, which agree to contribute actively to the development of the necessary technical specifications. A Work Item Description (WID) is prepared using a standard form, and is approved by the TSG. A named individual – the “rapporteur” - is identified for each feature and, where necessary, for each component subtask of the feature. It is the rapporteur’s responsibility to monitor work, and, for example, to hold extra ad hoc meetings to ensure progress is made. He will also prepare a short report on the feature to each TSG meeting, and will maintain the WID, presenting any changes to the TSG for approval.

  33. Feature 1 spec Project Management (3) Most “features” are too complex to be handled as a whole, so each is broken down into a number component tasks (“building blocks”). Each of these components is managed independently, with the feature rapporteur coordinating progress.

  34. Feature 1 spec Project Management (4) Even building blocks may be too complicated to manage as a whole, and further functional decomposition to smaller “work tasks” is possible. } work items Features, building blocks and work tasks are generically known as “work items”.

  35. Release N A new Release consists of the features of the old Release augmented with additional features of the new Release: Feature X Feature Y Release N+1 Feature Z

  36. Release N Some features may not be ready in time to be included in the new Release, and are held over till a later Release: Feature X Feature Y Feature Z To Release N+2

  37. A “Feature” is defined by its “Work Item Description” sheet. It is manifested by a set of new technical specifications and changes to existing specifications.

  38. Remember that a Feature is defined as: "new or substantially enhanced functionality which represents added value to the existing system" [3GPP TR 21.900]. This definition presumes that Features are defined in a commercial, non-technical way. Thus even senior management may see at a glance the commercial and financial implications of adding, or not adding, a feature to the system.

  39. A Feature can be broken down into “building blocks”, which can in turn be broken down into “work tasks”. In fact, the functional decomposition of a Feature into lower level tasks is rather ad hoc, and depends on the complexity of each individual Feature. As the level of break-down increases, the lower levels will be defined in progressively more technical terms. The number of levels of decomposition should be sufficient to allow reasonably accurate estimation and progress tracking of the work. The number of levels should be restricted by this aspect, and not continued to artificially deep nesting simply because further breakdown is possible; it is only necessary to go into sufficient detail to allow a reasonably accurate degree of project management.

  40. The standardization activity is typically arranged into the well-known three stages. Defines the service aspects of a feature (or part thereof) from the end-user's point of view. Stage 1 Defines the logical functionality and information flows amongst the functional entities involved in providing the service. Stage 2 Specifies any necessary functionality of physical entities (equipment) and the detailed protocols of the signalling between them. Stage 3

  41. For complex Features, stage 1 may be preceded by a feasibility study (sometimes called "stage 0") to analyse the market and potential technical difficulties of a given service or approach. Sometimes TSGs (notably RAN) create pre-standardization "study items" which produce reports forming the foundation for subsequent concrete standardization in "work items".

  42. Stage 1 specifications are normally produced by TSG SA1, and stage 2 specifications by SA2, though the stage 2 may need specialist knowledge from other TSGs' working groups.

  43. A separate stage 3 specification will be required for each protocol concerned with providing the service, which may well impact the whole equipment chain from User Equipment, through the Radio Access Network, to the Core Network, and on to network management interfaces, and to fixed networks. The service may require new codecs. Depending on the nature of the Feature, it may only be necessary to change existing specifications rather than to create completely new ones. This is particularly so at stage 3, where the service has to co-exist with all other services. However, this will vary from case to case.

  44. Feature Y Feature X Feature Z Stage 1 Stage 1 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 2 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 3 Stage 3 Each feature has the three stages. Stages 1 and 2 usually require the production of new TSs. Stage 3 may also require new TSs but may simply be implemented by a number of change requests to existing protocol TSs.

  45. Further stages not originally envisaged by CCITT are the development of Operations and Maintenance (O&M) specifications (mainly within SA5) and of Test specifications. Whilst O&M specs can be developed more or less at the same time as the stage 3 protocols, it is usually prudent to wait until the protocols are fairly stable (i.e. field tested) before embarking on detailed test specifications. Thus whilst the O&M specs may be only six months behind the stages 3, the test specs follow a year or more later.

  46. Feature X Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Development of the TSs and CRs needed to implement each feature starts with stage 1, progresses to stage 2, and concludes with stage 3.

  47. Feature X Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 In practice, there is feedback from stage 2 to stage 1 and from stage 3 to stage 2 (and even from stage 3 to stage 1), so the real progress is more like this:

  48. Feature Y Feature X Feature Z Stage 1 Stage 1 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 2 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 3 Stage 3 Overall progress is estimated and monitored by the sum of the individual features.

  49. For good technical and commercial reasons, a “freeze” date is set for each Release. At the point of freezing a Release, the list of features to be included in the Release is fixed, and any features under development which cannot be completed within an agreed time frame are postponed to a later Release. A feature is “completed” when all its component specifications are stable enough to be published by the SDOs and implemented by equipment manufacturers and network operators. Prior to “freezing”, the following milestones must have been achieved:

  50. Prior to “freezing”, the following milestones must have been achieved: • The features to be included in the Release will have been determined. (And any features which are to be delayed to a later Release will have been identified.) • For each feature, the stage 1 specifications must have been completed. • In addition, the stage 2 specifications should have been completed, or very nearly so. • Further, the stage 3 specifications should have been completed, or are planned to be completed within a fairly short time span.