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Anatomy of Normal Human Gait L. J. Rizzolo Yale University PowerPoint Presentation
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Anatomy of Normal Human Gait L. J. Rizzolo Yale University

Anatomy of Normal Human Gait L. J. Rizzolo Yale University

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Anatomy of Normal Human Gait L. J. Rizzolo Yale University

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  1. Anatomy of Normal Human Gait L. J. Rizzolo Yale University

  2. Main Points • Need a language to discuss gait • How we use a muscle differs from the anatomical description • The language of the physical therapist facilitates discussion • Fascial compartments organize our thinking • A clinical approach focuses the discussion on a limited subset of muscles and nerves • A more comprehensive understanding can be built on this foundation Larry Rizzolo, Yale University

  3. Types of Contraction Muscles can only pull by contraction --- They cannot push • Force of Deltoid > gravity  Arm abductsconcentric contraction • Force of Deltoid = gravity  Arm is stationary isocentric contraction • Force of Deltoid < gravity  Arm adducts eccentric contraction Muscle Interactions Agonist vs Anatgonist  Fine control of motion Synergist  Modifies action by antagonizing unwanted motion Fixator  Maintains position of one joint to enable movement of another joint Larry Rizzolo, Yale University

  4. Femoral artery & nerve Obturator a. & n. Deep femoral a Sciatic Nerve Ant. Tibial a. Deep Peroneal n. Superficial Peroneal n. Post. Tibial a. Tibial n Peroneal a. Start simple: One compartment, one nerve Thigh • Which muscles to include? • Primary Clinicians focus on those that are: • Easy to test • Easy to see atrophy • Reporter for the rest of the compartment Leg Larry Rizzolo, Yale University

  5. Exercises based on this approach http://info.med.yale.edu/surgery/anatomy Choose the <Exercises> link  <lower limb> link  Select from the exercises menu Larry Rizzolo, Yale University