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Respecting the Differences: Social Work Practice and Implications for Thailand. Walai Jantawiboon Baylor School of Social Work. http :// www . thaiwebsites . com / Download / pages / monksatwork_chiangmai . htm. Agenda. Brief introduction to Thailand

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Respecting the Differences: Social Work Practice and Implications for Thailand


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    1. Respecting the Differences: Social Work Practice and Implications for Thailand Walai Jantawiboon Baylor School of Social Work http://www.thaiwebsites.com/Download/pages/monksatwork_chiangmai.htm

    2. Agenda • Brief introduction to Thailand • American and Thai perceptions of well-being & values • Social Work Approach - Discussions and activities • Implications for social work practice in Thailand and across cultures

    3. Objectives The participants will: • Understand the unique features of social work practice in Thailand. • Examine the similarities and differences in practicing social work in the United States and Thailand. • Discover how social workers can practice effectively across cultures.

    4. Thailand – Quick Facts

    5. 2 min VDO http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOJy_rr9Sy4&feature=related

    6. Social Work in Thai สังคมสงเคราะห์săng-komsŏng-krór สังคมsăng-kom = Society, Social สงเคราะห์ sŏng-krór = Assist, Help http://www.thai2english.com/dictionary/22254.html

    7. Dimensions of Well-Being Ingersoll-Dayton et al. (2001). Psychological well-being Asian style: The perspective of Thai elders.

    8. Value System Asians are more others-oriented - Drawing on their religious heritage, Asians do not regard the self as distinct from others. Ingersoll-Dayton et al. (2001). Psychological well-being Asian style: The perspective of Thai elders.

    9. Value System Westerners are more self-oriented - Influenced by individuals’ free will and valuing the individuals’ unique set of internal traits and emotions - autonomy and differentiation from others.

    10. Approach • Eclectic • Cultural Sensitivity & Awareness • Critical Thinking

    11. Eclectic • Putting some ideas of several theories together to suit the purpose of our clients • Consistency, planning, and testing decisions • Team-based basis is preferred to individual basis • Three things in common - a view of human nature, a value system, and an approach to our clients • Continuing, lifelong education to mature in practice Ellor, J. (n.d.) Eclectic Counseling [Unpublished] Payne, M. (2005). Modern social work theory.

    12. 3-Minute Activity Cultural Sensitivity & Awareness Rice Beans Bread

    13. Cultural Sensitivity & Awareness • Self-Awareness • Appreciation and sensitivity to others’ cultures • Willingness to learn about cultural differences • Respect for other worldviews Fong, R. & Furuto, S. (2001) Culturally competent practice: Skills, interventions, and evaluations.

    14. Critical Thinking • Careful examination and evaluation of beliefs and actions • Use of standards (Social workers’ code of ethics and principles) -- clarity, accuracy, relevance, and completeness • Evaluating evidence, considering alternative points of view, willing to present and listen to opposing views Gibbs, L. & Gambrill, E. (1999) Critical thinking for social workers: Exercise for the helping profession.

    15. Case Study http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpfRSifxO8s

    16. Let’s think critically together. • What are your views about this story? • What do you see from the story about the client’s culture - beliefs and actions? • What would you like to explore more about helping in this context?

    17. Implications for Social Workers • Applying generalist practice model – engagement, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation, termination, follow-up. • Looking from strengths perspective. • Looking critically at different levels of approach – micro (individual), mezzo (family & group), and macro (community and larger extent).

    18. Implications for Social Workers • Being sensitive to a client’s culture (beliefs, values, actions). • Relationship building is very crucial. • Clients are experts of their lives as long as they are cognitively and mentally able to make an informed decision.

    19. Take Away “The purpose of life is to serve and to show compassion and the will to help others. Only then have we ourselves become true human beings.” Albert Schweitzer

    20. References Payne, M. (2005). Modern social work theory (3rd ed.). Chicago: Lyceum. Ellor, J. (n.d.) Eclectic Counseling [Unpublished] Fong, R. & Furuto, S. (2001) Culturally competent practice: Skills, interventions, and evaluations. (Eds) Boston: Allyn and Beacon. Gibbs, L. & Gambrill, E. (1999) Critical thinking for social workers: Exercise for the helping profession. CA: Pine Forge Press. Ingersoll-Dayton, B., Saengtienchai, C., Kespichayawattana, J., & Aungsuroch, Y. (2001). Psychological well-being Asian style: The perspective of Thai elders. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 16(3), 283-302.