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  1. 1. Fitness and Wellness and Stress Management(14 hrs.) TCLEOSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES 07/27/04

  2. Unit Goal: 1.1. Demonstrate an understanding of lifestyle, nutrition, and fitness concepts required to maintain a high level of fitness and wellness. • 1.1.1. Describe the importance of fitness and wellness in the law enforcement profession. • 1.1.2 Identify healthy nutritional strategies. • 1.1.3. Develop a personal nutrition plan.

  3. Unit Goal: 1.1. Demonstrate an understanding of lifestyle, nutrition, and fitness concepts required to maintain a high level of fitness and wellness.

  4. 1.1.1. Describe the importance of fitness and wellness in the law enforcement profession.

  5. DEFINITION OF PHYSICAL FITNESS: The condition of the body which enables an individual to use his/her body in activities requiring strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, coordination, agility, power, balance, speed, and accuracy, without undue experience of fatigue and exhaustion.

  6. DEFINITION OF WELLNESS: That condition of the human organism which consists of its health and disease status and risk potential. There are varying degrees of wellness, ranging from death to optimal well-being. Genuine health or wellness is not just the absence of disease or infirmity, it is a state of positive well-being. It induces the physical, mental, spiritual, and socio-emotional dimensions of life. Total well-being translates into the practice of positive lifestyle behaviors and good health habits.

  7. THE FITNESS/WELLNESS RELATIONSHIP

  8. Physical fitness can be divided into two categories: • Health related: strength, dynamic strength (muscle endurance), flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, body composition. • Motor related: coordination, agility, power balance, speed accuracy. • The health-related components are more important to wellness and quality of life than the skill-related components linked to motor performance.

  9. FACTORS INFLUENCING FITNESS/WELLNESS

  10. The concept of the wellness lifestyle can be visualized in terms of a wellness pyramid:

  11. Wellness Pyramid • Self-responsibility • Stress management • Smoking cessation • Weight control • Nutrition • Exercise

  12. Regular exercise and proper nutrition make up the foundation on which the Wellness Pyramid is built. • Adequate attention and proper application to these two areas will set the standard for positive improvements in the areas.

  13. Self-responsibility is the cap which holds down all the other areas in the pyramid. • Rather than being an area of mastery itself, it lends support to the successful application of the other wellness areas.

  14. How we act, react, function, and perform during our everyday life has the greatest impact on fitness/wellness. • It is these behaviors that directly influence our fitness level and where we are on the wellness continuum (death to optimal well-being).

  15. THE HEALTH AND DISABILITY STATUS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT AS A PROFESSION

  16. As an occupational group, law enforcement professionals have a poor health profile.

  17. High risk with high incidence of stress-related disorders: • Alcoholism • Divorce • Suicide

  18. THE IMPORTANCE OF FITNESS FOR THE LAW ENFORCEMENT PROFESSION

  19. Physical fitness has a significant impact on:

  20. Physical health • Reducing coronary risk • Minimizing hypo-kinetic disease • Weight reduction and control • Fatigue tolerance • Energy production

  21. Emotional health • Decreased anxiety and depression • Improved self-concept • Ability to deal with stress

  22. Job Performance • Increased alertness • Reduced absenteeism • Increased productivity • Reduced health care cost

  23. 1.1.2. Identify healthy nutritional strategies.

  24. ESSENTIAL DIETARY COMPONENTS: • Carbohydrates • Fats • Proteins • Vitamins, minerals • Water

  25. DAILY DIETARY CONSUMPTION • Consume at least 4 servings of fruit and vegetables (at least one fresh or frozen fruit or vegetable and at least one fruit that is high in vitamin C). • Consume at least 4 whole grain, bread, pasta or cereal servings. • Consume at least 2 dairy product servings (low fat milk, yogurt or cheese). • Consume at least 4 servings of fruit and vegetables (at least one fresh or frozen fruit or vegetable and at least one fruit that is high in vitamin C).

  26. DAILY DIETARY CONSUMPTION • Consume no more than 4 oz. (uncooked weight) of meat - lean red meat, skinless poultry or baked, broiled or poached fish.  • Prepare and consume foods without adding salt (use spices instead).  • Drink no more than 4 servings of coffee, tea or other beverage containing caffeine.

  27. DAILY DIETARY CONSUMPTION • No more than 2 servings of alcoholic beverage. • No more than one serving of sweets (candy, cookies, pie, sweetened beverage).

  28. Information about serving sizes may be found in nutrition and diet books.

  29. MORE GUIDELINES FOR A HEALTHY DIET • Eat enough calories to attain and maintain desired body weight. • Eat a balanced diet and a variety of foods at each meal. • Establish consistent eating patterns and do not skip meals.

  30. MORE GUIDELINES FOR A HEALTHY DIET • Eat smaller, easily digested meals.  • Eat slowly, in a relaxed pleasant place.  • Eat fewer foods that are high in cholesterol.  • Eat fewer foods that are high in fat (no more than 30% of daily intake).

  31. MORE GUIDELINES FOR A HEALTHY DIET • Substitute polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fats for saturated fats. • Eat more complex carbohydrates and less refined, simple sugars.  • Increase dietary fiber.  • Drink 6-8 eight-ounce glasses of water a day.

  32. MORE GUIDELINES FOR A HEALTHY DIET • Avoid excessive sodium (salt). • Limit caffeine. • Limit alcohol.

  33. Balance, variety, and moderation are the keys to adequate nutrition.

  34. NUTRITION ASSESSMENT

  35. Four Categories: • Healthy (prudent) Diet, • Calorie Control, • Fat/Cholesterol Control, • Sodium (salt) Control

  36. The purpose of the Nutrition Assessment is to assist students in evaluating their individual eating habits. The assessment will also help students develop their personalized Nutrition Plan.

  37. 1.1.3. Develop a personal nutrition plan.

  38. NUTRITION PLAN Using the student's Nutrition Profile (assessment results), discuss what categories need improvement. Develop a Nutrition Plan to document the student's goals and to give to the student for his/her personal use.

  39. The Nutrition Plan should include strategies for: • a healthy diet • calorie control • reducing fat and cholesterol • reducing sodium (salt)

  40. MAINTAINING HEALTHY NUTRITIONAL STRATEGIES • Motivation • Behavior Modification

  41. Sources of Nutrition and Fitness Information: • Institute for Aerobics Research - Dallas, Texas • American Heart Assoc. • American Cancer Society • American Dietetics Assoc. • Registered Dietitians

  42. Sources of Nutrition and Fitness Information: • American Diabetes Assoc. • Sports Medicine Research Journals • Nutrition Books • Fitness Books

  43. There are some defeats more triumphant than victories. Michel de Montaigne (1553 - 1592)

  44. Unit Goal: 1.2 Be aware of the causes and effects of stress in the lives of peace officers. • 1.2.1 Identify common stressors of peace officers. • 1.2.2. Identify emotional and physical symptoms of stress. • 1.2.3. Explain post-traumatic stress disorder. • 1.2.4. Recognize the positive role of stress and approaches to coping with stress. • Unit Goal: 1.3. Become aware of the problems, symptoms, and responses to substance abuse in law enforcement. • 1.3.1. Identify the extent of alcohol and drug abuse in the work place and in law enforcement. • 1.3.2. Explain the consequences of personal use of alcohol/drugs. • 1.3.3. Discuss responsibilities an officer has to a co-worker when substance abuse threatens the safety and efficiency of the department. • Unit Goal: 1.4. Develop personal strategies for the positive management of stress. • 1.4.1. Describe the role of attitude and perception in stress management. • 1.4.2. Recognize stress reduction techniques. • 1.4.3 Discuss psychological reactions that officers often experience following a shooting incident.

  45. Unit Goal: 1.2 Be aware of the causes and effects of stress in the lives of peace officers.

  46. 1.2.1 Identify and discuss the common stressors of peace officers.

  47. All occupations experience stressSome stress is "good"

  48. Job stress

  49. External to agency • Frustration with judicial system • Lack of consideration by the courts for scheduling officer appearances • Perceived lack of public support • Negative or distorted media coverage of policing • Officers' dislike of the decisions and interests of city council, county commissioners, or legislature

  50. Internal to agency • Policies that are offensive to officers • Poor training and inadequate career development opportunities • Lack of identity and recognition for good performance • Poor economic benefits, working conditions, equipment • Excessive paperwork • Inconsistent discipline • Perceived favoritism regarding promotions and assignments • Explore Myths • Ex: Weak people are more susceptible to stress.