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Bloom’s Taxonomy How will it impact in your classroom?. Eileen Herteis The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre. What is Bloom’s Taxonomy?. A theory to identify cognitive levels (Levels of thinking) Represents the full range of cognitive functioning up to and including adult levels

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Bloom s taxonomy how will it impact in your classroom l.jpg

Bloom’s Taxonomy How will it impact in your classroom?

Eileen Herteis

The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


What is bloom s taxonomy l.jpg
What is Bloom’s Taxonomy?

  • A theory to identify cognitive levels (Levels of thinking)

  • Represents the full range of cognitive functioning up to and including adult levels

  • Not necessarily demonstrated by all children

  • These levels can be improved with practice

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


Bloom s taxonomy l.jpg
Bloom’s Taxonomy

Evaluation

Synthesis

Analysis

Application

Comprehension

Knowledge

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


Bloom s taxonomy provides l.jpg
Bloom’s Taxonomy Provides

1. The basis for creating C-L-E-A-R student learning expectations:

  • Comprehensible to students

  • Learner-Centered

  • Evident, observable in fulfillment

  • Attainable, but of a high standard

  • Relatedto the course content and goals

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


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Bloom’s Taxonomy Provides

2. Cues for asking questions that

stimulate classroom discussion

3. A framework for ensuring that you

encourage students’ higher-order thinking skills

Note: This is a taxonomy, not a hierarchy.

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


In the following slides l.jpg

This column represents the learner behaviour or outcome you desire or wish to test.

This column

represents the verbs

which should start the

learning expectations or

questions.

In the following slides

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


1 knowledge low level thinking l.jpg

The learner should be able to desire or wish to test.

Acquire specific facts, ideas, or vocabulary

Recall and move information from short-term to long-term memory

Cues and starter verbs include

Define

List

Record

Repeat

Name

Recall

1. Knowledge (low level thinking)

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


2 comprehension low level thinking l.jpg

Learners should be able to desire or wish to test.

Grasp the meaning of material learned

Communicate what

has been learned and interpret it

Reach understanding

Cues and starter verbs include

Describe

Discuss

Explain

Identify

Locate

Report

2. Comprehension (low level thinking)

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


3 application low level thinking l.jpg

The learner should be able to desire or wish to test.

Use learned knowledge

in new or concrete ways, or

to solve new problems

Cues and starter verbs include

Apply

Illustrate

Demonstrate

Dramatize

Employ

Use

3. Application (low level thinking)

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


4 analysis high level thinking l.jpg

The learner should be desire or wish to test.

able to

Take ideas and knowledge apart

Dismantle concepts into their components and

seek links between concepts (compare)

find what is unique (contrast)

Cues and starter verbs include

Analyze

Calculate

Distinguish

Examine

Experiment

Relate

Solve

4. Analysis (high level thinking)

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


5 synthesis high level thinking l.jpg

Learner should be able to desire or wish to test.

Re-organize parts to create a new or original concept or idea

Make predictions based on analysis of knowledge

Cues and starter verbs include

Arrange

Compose

Formulate

Construct

Predict

Design

Create

5. Synthesis (high level thinking)

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


6 evaluation high level thinking l.jpg

Learner should be able to desire or wish to test.

Make judgements or decisions based on logical criteria or conditions

Rate or assess

conclusions

Make valid choices

Cues and starter verbs include

Assess

Select

Rate

Estimate

Compare

Judge

Revise

In my opinion

6. Evaluation (high level thinking)

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


Other points l.jpg
Other Points desire or wish to test.

  • Bloom felt that problem solving was best suited to higher levels of thinking but also should include the level of application

  • Younger children due to their egocentric nature & incomplete neurological development initially focus on the lower levels of cognition

  • However, asking some higher order questions help children to practice to look beyond simple interpretations of factual material

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


Other points14 l.jpg
Other Points desire or wish to test.

  • Students need to have the information and understanding of a concept at the lower level before they can solve a problem or think at a higher level. E.g. you need to know & understand the plot of a story before you can analyse the story and recreate a new ending.

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


Teaching gifted students classes l.jpg
Teaching Gifted Students/Classes desire or wish to test.

  • All activities need to encourage students to work on a daily basis with higher order thinking activities

  • Expectations and application activities should beat a synthesis, evaluation or analysis level

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


Two useful resources l.jpg
Two Useful Resources desire or wish to test.

  • Bloom, Benjamin S. (Ed). Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: TheClassification of Educational Goals. Handbook I. Cognitive Domain (pp.201-207). New York: McKay. 1956.

  • Miller, W & Miller, M. Handbook for College Teaching (pp.33-51). PineCrest Publications. 1997.

Eileen Herteis, The Gwenna Moss Teaching & Learning Centre


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