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Singapore’s Education System. By Dewayne Wammack Arkansas State University Spring 2010. Flag and Location. CIA – The World Fact book – Singapore. n.d. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html#top. Facts.

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singapore s education system
Singapore’s Education System

By

Dewayne Wammack

Arkansas State University

Spring 2010

flag and location
Flag and Location

CIA – The World Fact book – Singapore. n.d. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html#top

facts
Facts
  • Island between Malaysia and Indonesia
  • Population
      • 4,657,542 (July 2009 est.)
  • Area of Island is 697 Kilometers
  • Slightly 3.5 times larger than Washington D. C.
  • Climate
      • Tropical
      • Two Distinct Monsoon Seasons
          • Northeastern Monsoon (December to March)
          • Southwestern Monsoon (June to September)
  • Natural Resources
      • Fish
      • Deepwater Ports

CIA – The World Fact book – Singapore. n.d. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html#top

slide4

Age Structure

  • 0-14 years: 14.4% (male 348,382/female 324,050)
  • 15-64 years: 76.7% (male 1,737,972/female 1,833,415)
  • 65 years and over: 8.9% (male 184,393/female 229,330) (2009 est.)
  • Median Age
  • total: 39 years
  • male: 38.5 years
  • female: 39.4 years (2009 est.)
  • Ethnic Groups
  • Chinese 76.8%, Malay 13.9%, Indian 7.9%, other 1.4% (2000 census)
  • Religions
      • Buddhist 42.5%, Muslim 14.9%, Taoist 8.5%, Hindu 4%, Catholic 4.8%, other Christian 9.8%, other 0.7%, none 14.8% (2000 census)
  • Languages
  • Mandarin 35%, English 23%, Malay 14.1%, Hokkien 11.4%, Cantonese 5.7%, Teochew 4.9%, Tamil 3.2%, other Chinese dialects 1.8%, other 0.9% (2000 census)
      • CIA – The World Fact book – Singapore. n.d. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html#top
slide5

Literacy

  • definition: age 15 and over can read and write
  • General Literacy rates (15 years and over) (2002): 93.7%
  • male: 96.6%
  • female: 88.6% (2000 census)
  • Literacy in two or more languages: 56%
  • Education Expenditures
  • 3.7% of GDP (2001)
  • Military Service Age and Obligation
  • 18-21 years of age for male compulsory military service; 16 years of age for volunteers; 2-year conscript service obligation, with a reserve obligation to age 40 (enlisted) or age 50 (officers) (2008)
  • Military Expenditures
  • 4.9% of GDP (2005 est.)
  • CIA – The World Fact book – Singapore. n.d. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html#top
slide6

GDP

  • $50,300 (2009 est.)
  • country comparison to the world: 8
  • Labor Force
  • agriculture: 23.8%
  • industry: 23.8%
  • services: 76.2% (2008)
      • CIA – The World Fact book – Singapore. n.d. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html#top
history of singapore
Historyof Singapore
  • Foundedas a trading post in 1819
  • Made a Crown colony of Britain in 1946
  • Attained full internal self-government 1959. Parliamentary System
  • 1963 joined Malaya, Sabah (North Borneo), and Sarawak in the Federation of

Malaysia. It withdrew from the federation on Aug. 9, 1965, and a month later proclaimed itself a republic. Malaysia released them from the Federation.

  • Developed into one of the cleanest, safest, and most economically prosperous cities in Asia.
  • Very strict civil obedience rules (has endured strict criticism)

(http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107963.html)

education levels in singapore
Education Levels in Singapore

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

slide10

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

pre school goals
Pre-School Goals
  • To develop the young child wholly.
  • Equip children with communication skills and teach them how to interact with others.
  • Be easily accessible to parents all over Singapore.
      • One near every residential housing area
      • Parents do not have to travel far to transport child

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

kindergarten 3 years of age not compulsory but taken by most
Kindergarten: (3 years of Age) Not compulsory but taken by most

Continued with goals established in Kindergarten 1

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

childcare system ages 2 to 7
Childcare System: Ages 2 to 7
  • Cares for children while parents are at work
  • Does not have to register with the Ministry of Education as Kindergartens are required
  • Regulated by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth, and Sports. Must register with the Ministry.
  • A fee is charged to the parents.
  • Over 600 in Singapore
  • Goals:
    • Care for children
    • Provide adequate playtime and study time for children
    • Allow children to adjust to demands of school life
    • Provide an enriching experience: expand creativity and imagination of the child.

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

ministry of education
Ministry of Education
  • Government Expenditure on Education (in million SGD)

2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09

  • Recurrent 4975 5215 6352 6786 7486
  • Primary 1071 1126 1290 1497 1561
  • Secondary 1276 1328 1562 1781 1870
  • Pre-University 227 238 271 341 344
  • ITE 191 204 249 254 275
  • Polytechnics 594 623 729 817 932
  • NIE 73 85 100 102 113
  • Universities 1030 1058 1719 1491 1822
  • Development 1239 867 608 742 760
  • Government Recurrent Expenditure on Education Per Student (in SGD)
  • Primary 3575 3820 4243 5026 5306
  • Secondary 5746 5793 6246 7230 7456
  • Pre-University 8850 9445 10161 12386 12066
  • ITE 9399 9249 10209 10543 10834
  • Polytechnics 10695 10843 11903 12482 13260
  • Universities 17609 17793 18472 19011 20284

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

national education
National Education
  • Taught to develop pride and nationhood in the students
  • Install six core values (six messages)
    • Singapore is our homeland; this is where we belong
    • We must preserve racial and religious harmony
    • We must uphold meritocracy and incorruptibility
    • No one owes Singapore a living
    • We must ourselves defend Singapore
    • We have confidence in our future

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

non academic pursuits
Non Academic Pursuits
  • Holistic Education – creating well-rounded future Singaporeans to compete and survive in the modern world
  • Morally and Socially responsible
  • All schools teach Character and Moral education

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

primary education
Primary Education
  • Compulsory education begins in Primary. All students required to attend six years of education. (Core 6 years of education – Ages 6 to 15)
  • 131 Government owned and 45 Government aided Primary schools
  • Located near residential areas
  • Years 1 through 4: Foundation education
    • Communication and foundation for mathematical calculations
  • Years 5 and 6: Orientation
    • Bridge gap between foundation stage and secondary education system.
  • Allstudents take Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE)
  • Results of the exam will post students to secondary schools of their choice
  • Primary 1 and 2 have seen a reduction in class size from 40 to 30 students.
  • Streaming exercise
    • All students (except gifted) take a series of test to determine the stream they will be moved into in secondary school.

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

gifted education programs
Gifted Education Programs
  • In Primary 3 students can take a Screen test for Gifted Education placement.
  • In Primary 4 students take the selection test which is made up of an English paper, math paper and a General abilities paper.
  • Gifted Education Programs serve students from Primary 4 to Secondary 4.
  • 9 Gifted Education Programs in Singapore.
  • Smaller class size (25 per class)
  • Enriched curriculum
  • Extra subjects beyond the regular student requirements
    • Social Studies: Compulsory in GEP classes. Must pass in order to move to Secondary GEP program.
  • Independent Study Option
    • Compulsory
    • Primary 4: Undergo training in various aspects (Research skills, Library skills, Interview and survey skills and science experiment skills)
    • Primary 5 and 6: Research project

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

grading scale of the psle
Grading scale of the PSLE
  • Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html
secondary four groups
Secondary: Four groups

Four years Lead up to a Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education – Ordinary ‘O’ Level Exam

Four years lead up to a Singapore-Cambridge GCE - Normal ‘N’ Level exam with a possible fifth year followed by an Ordinary ‘O’ Level exam.

slide21

Mother language taught at a higher level in Special group compared to express group.

  • Normal technical group offer more technical courses than normal academic group
  • Students required to take co-curricular activities CCA.
    • Graded with other achievements.
    • LEAPS – Leadership, enrichment, achievement, participation, sevice
  • Specialization begins in Secondary school.
  • Grading system according to Singapore-Cambridge GCE ‘O’ Level examination

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

special education
Special Education
  • Can be exempt from having to attend school under compulsory education
  • Twenty special education programs in Singapore.
    • Managed by Volunteer welfare organization receiving money from the Ministry of Education.
  • Depending on the severity of the condition, a student can be mainstreamed in with the regular students.
  • The general mission of SPED schools is to provide the best possible education and training to children with special needs so as to enable them to function optimally and integrate well into society.

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

people first language
People First Language
  • Labels Not to Use                                 People First Language==================                             ======================The handicapped or disabled                People with disabilities

He is autistic/he suffers from autism He has autism

She is learning disabled                        She has a learning disability

He is mentally retarded                       He has a cognitive impairment

She suffers from a birth defect         She has a congenital disability

He's crippled                                        He has a physical impairment

She needs handicapped parking          She needs accessible parking

She has a problem with                        She has a need for

They are disabled                                They have special needs

Normal or healthy kids                        Typical kids

pre universities
Pre-Universities
  • Prepares for further education after secondary school
  • Must take part in Singapore-Cambridge General Certification of Education advanced level
      • GCE ‘A’ Level
  • Prestigious qualification
  • Assists in finding suitable University of students choice.
  • Junior colleges and Centralized Institutes

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

junior colleges
Junior Colleges
  • 1965 – created to broaden skills of those wanting to enter
  • 1969 – first Junior college established in Singapore
  • Provides most direct route to University
  • Seventeen JC’s in Singapore
  • Two year education preparing for GCE ‘A’ Level Exam as well as entrance to University
  • Focus both intellectual and mental discipline which promotes independent and self-directed learners.
  • Receive GCE ‘A’ Level certificate – recognized by Universities all over the world
  • Students select courses to work toward specialization
  • Students must obtain less than 20 points in their L1R5 during GCE ‘O’ Level examinations
  • Not easy to achieve results needed to enter JC
  • Students pay a subsidized fee of $6.00 per month and miscellaneous fee between $9 and $22 per month.
  • Independent JC’s can run as high as $300 per month
    • Scholarships offered to offset the cost of independent JC’s

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

centralized institutes
Centralized Institutes
  • Similar to Junior Colleges
  • Allows three years instead of two to complete. (slows down process)
  • Only one in Singapore
  • Only Pre-University to offer a commerce course: two subjects
    • Principles of Accounting
    • Management of Business
  • L1R4 must be less than 20. Easier to achieve than the score for Junior college

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

subject streams
Subject Streams
  • Science and Mathematics
  • Arts and Humanities

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

master plan three installments
Master Plan (Three Installments)
  • Master Plan I
    • 1997 – 2002
    • Enhance Linkages between the school and the world around it.
    • Encourage creative thinking and lifelong learning
    • Encourage innovative processes in education
    • Promote administrative and management excellence in education

All students need access to computers.

Students will have hands-on computer use for 30% of the curriculum time by 2002.

Ranked second in the world behind Finland in internet access in schools (2002)

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

slide29

Master Plan II 2003 – 2008

    • Move from supporting current curriculum to designing curriculum taking in account the new teaching methods possible through technology.
    • Move from teacher-centered to pupil-centered strategy for learning
    • Schools will have greater autonomy and flexibility in the use of funds for IT.

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

slide30

Master Plan III 2009 – 2014

    • Strengthen integration of ICT into curriculum pedagogy and assessment to enhance learning and develop competencies for the 21st century
    • Provide differentiated professional development that is more practice based and models how ICT can be effectively used to help students learn.
    • Improve sharing of best practices and successful innovations
    • Enhance ICT provisions in schools to support the implementation of Master Plan III
    • Goals
      • Strengthen competencies for self-directed learning
      • Tailor learning experiences according to the way that each student learns best
      • Encourage students to go deeper and advance their learning
      • Learn anywhere

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

issues
Issues
  • The effect non-coed schools have on the students.
  • Creating schools for the elitist. (Streaming according to the test in Primary)

Do the positive results outweigh the negative consequences of the these methods?

references
References

CIA – The World Fact book – Singapore. n.d. Retrieved March 26, 2010, from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/sn.html#top

Education: Key to Our Future – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01348/academic.html

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26,2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

Ministry of Education – Singapore. Retrieved March 26, 2010 from http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/primary/

NationMaster - Singapore Education statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2010, from http://www.nationmaster.com/country/sn-singapore/edu-education