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Residential Lighting Inventory Study Prepared by Insightrix Research Inc. July 22 nd , 2008 Background & Methodology Study Background and Objectives

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residential lighting inventory study

Residential Lighting Inventory Study

Prepared by

Insightrix Research Inc.

July 22nd, 2008

study background and objectives
Study Background and Objectives
  • SaskPower is interested in uncovering how residential customers are outfitting their homes with light bulbs in addition to their attitudes towards various types of bulbs.
  • Specific objectives of the study include determining:
    • Self reported lighting inventory information in the residential sector (e.g. how many light bulbs, what type of light bulbs, in what rooms, etc.)
    • Behavioral attributes of residential customers (e.g. duration of lighting use in various rooms, etc.)
    • Purchasing environment, behaviour, awareness and satisfaction with respect to light bulbs
  • To meet these needs, a quantitative research project was undertaken with Insightrix Research, Inc.
study methodology
Study Methodology
  • Due to the time involved in having respondents complete an inventory of the light bulbs used in their homes, typical telephone interviewing techniques are not appropriate.
  • Further, due to the strong desire for a representative sample of the general public, self-selection techniques such as a mail-out paper questionnaire are also not ideal.
  • Based on these requirements, Insightrix developed a unique hybrid research approach to achieve a representative sample while at the same time, accurate responses to the inventory section of the questionnaire.
study methodology cont d
Study Methodology (cont’d)
  • Specifically, the research methodology included:
    • Recruiting a random and representative selection of the general public to participate in the study via telephone
    • Once individuals agreed to participate in the research, they were offered two choices: receive an email with a link to an online version of the questionnaire, or receive a paper copy of the questionnaire in the mail
    • Online: upon receiving the email link, individuals printed out a copy of the inventory section of the questionnaire and proceeded to fill it out. They then returned to their computer and entered the data. Subsequent questions regarding attitudes and light bulb purchasing behaviours were also asked of respondents at this time.
    • Paper: upon receiving the paper questionnaire, respondents completed the inventory section. One week later, Insightrix telephone interviewers contacted these individuals to collect their responses. While on the phone a subsequent set of questions regarding attitudes and light bulb purchasing behaviours were also asked of respondents.
    • To facilitate positive response rates, a series of prizes draws were offered to those who participated in the research (2 laptop computers, 4 gift cards to home improvement stores - $400 each).
study methodology cont d6
Study Methodology (cont’d)
  • A total of 1000 respondents participated in the study from throughout the province.
  • To be eligible for the study, respondents must be SaskPower customers (i.e. their household must receive a SaskPower bill). However, respondents did not need to be the primary decision maker as it relates to the buyer of light bulbs in the household. This was to ensure a representative mix of the general population among SaskPower customers.
  • Regional quotas were set to ensure a balanced mix from within the province.
  • Data were weighted by region, age and gender to match actual adult population characteristics of SaskPower’s service area
  • Field dates: June 5th to June 30th, 2008
  • Margin of error: ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20
    • Note: margins of error among sub-groupings of the sample will be greater
study methodology cont d7
Study Methodology (cont’d)
  • Research Notes:
    • Responses to the lighting inventory question are based on current bulb usage at the time of the study (i.e. excludes holiday lighting)
    • Further, length of time light bulbs are on is likely impacted by the fact that the study was conducted during the point at which days are the longest during the year
    • If a respondent reported having “0” bulbs in a particular room (interior) / area (exterior) it was assumed they did not have this room / area in their home
    • Potential response error: while efforts were made to ensure respondents reported the number of bulbs in their homes, from a review of the raw data, some respondents may have still responded in terms of light fixtures rather than bulbs. This can result in reduced number of bulbs in the inventory exercise than may actually be the case.
regional distribution of interviews
Regional Distribution of Interviews

North Sk (n=248)

Central Sk (n=168)

Saskatoon (n=140)

Regina (n=199)

South Sk (n=245)

distribution of interior light bulbs
Distribution of INTERIOR light bulbs*

AVERAGE (all rooms): 37.55

* Excludes holiday lighting due to time of year of the study

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

distribution of exterior light bulbs
Distribution of EXTERIOR light bulbs*

AVERAGE (all rooms): 6.94

* Excludes holiday lighting due to time of year of the study

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

distribution of all light bulbs interior and exterior
Distribution of ALL light bulbs (interior and exterior)*

AVERAGE (all rooms): 44.49

* Excludes holiday lighting due to time of year of the study

Q1 / Q2: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

incidence of each room in home
Incidence of each room in home*

*NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific area (it was assume that 0 bulbs means the respondent does not have this room).

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

average number of interior light bulbs
Average number of interior light bulbs

AVERAGE (all rooms): 37.55

  • Lights controlled by Dimmers: (all rooms: 2.87)
  • Incandescent: 1.75
  • CFLs: 0.17
  • Fluorescent tubes: 0.02
  • Halogen: 0.40
  • Lights controlled by timers: (all rooms: 0.27)
  • Incandescent: 0.18
  • CFLs: 0.06
  • Fluorescent tubes: 0.01
  • Halogen: 0.02

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

average t ime at least one interior bulb is on hours
Average time at least one interior bulb is on (hours)

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

incidence of each exterior area
Incidence of each exterior area*

AVERAGE (all areas): 6.94

*NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific area (it was assume that 0 bulbs means the respondent does not have this area – however this may not be the case with respect to landscape/walkways and patio/deck).

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

average number of exterior light bulbs
Average number of exterior light bulbs

AVERAGE (all areas): 6.94

  • Outdoor Motion and Photo sensors: (all areas: 0.91)
  • Incandescent: 0.55
  • CFLs: 0.05
  • Fluorescent tubes: 0.0
  • Halogen: 0.32
  • Outdoor Timers: (all areas: 0.4)
  • Incandescent: 0.20
  • CFLs: 0.05
  • Fluorescent tubes: 0.01
  • Halogen: 0.13

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific area

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

average time at least one exterior bulb is on hours
AVERAGE time at least one exterior bulb is on (hours)

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

distribution of light bulbs
Distribution of light bulbs*

Three quarters (75.3%) of households have at least one CFL bulb in their home (exterior or interior).

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

slide21

Average number of light bulbs by home type (interior & exterior)

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

cfl bulb usage
CFL bulb usage

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of incandescent bulbs by interior room
Proportion of incandescent bulbs by interior room

AVERAGE (all rooms): 59.2%

TOTAL # of bulbs in room

7.0

5.7

5.7

5.5

5.2

3.9

3.8

3.7

2.2

6.1

1.9

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of clf bulbs by interior room
Proportion of CLF bulbs by interior room

AVERAGE (all rooms): 24.4%

TOTAL # of bulbs in room

7.0

5.7

5.7

5.5

5.2

3.9

3.8

3.7

2.2

6.1

1.9

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of fluorescent tubes by interior room
Proportion of fluorescent tubes by interior room

AVERAGE (all rooms): 59.2%

TOTAL # of bulbs in room

7.0

5.7

5.7

5.5

5.2

3.9

3.8

3.7

2.2

6.1

1.9

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of halogen bulbs by interior room
Proportion of halogen bulbs by interior room

AVERAGE (all rooms): 59.2%

TOTAL # of bulbs in room

7.0

5.7

5.7

5.5

5.2

3.9

3.8

3.7

2.2

6.1

1.9

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific room

Q1: The goal of this question is to identify every light bulb used in your home, INCLUDING those in lamps.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of incandescent bulbs by exterior area
Proportion of incandescent bulbs by exterior area

AVERAGE (all areas): 64.3%

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific area

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of clf bulbs by exterior area
Proportion of CLF bulbs by exterior area

AVERAGE (all areas): 11.1%

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific area

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of fluorescent tubes by exterior area
Proportion of fluorescent tubes by exterior area

AVERAGE (all areas): 13.1%

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific area

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

proportion of halogen bulbs by exterior area
Proportion of halogen bulbs by exterior area

AVERAGE (all areas): 11.5%

NOTE: Excludes respondents who reported “0” bulbs in a specific area

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

room with light bulb on the longest
Room with light bulb on the longest

60.4% of respondents who live on an acreage indicate the kitchen as the longest lit room in the house versus 42.9% of respondents who do not live on an acreage

Average hours this light is turned on: 4.5 hours

Q3: Thinking of the single light bulb that you have on the longest in your house each day, what room is it in?

Q4: Approximately how many hours is this light turned on everyday?

Base: All Respondents (n=999)

slide33

Summary by Exterior Space

Q2: Please complete a similar exercise for the exterior of your home.

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

attitudes towards features of light bulbs when purchasing
Attitudes towards features of light bulbs when purchasing

Rated a 2

"Not at All Important"

"Very Important"

Rated a 6

Bulb Wattage

Bulb Type (incandescent, CFL…)

Energy/Power Cost of Operating Bulb

Purchase Price

Light Colour (Soft Light / Daylight)

Light Bulb Appearance

Brand of Light Bulb

Q5: When shopping for light bulbs, how important are each of the following?

Base: All Respondents (n=1,000)

slide36

Demographic differences between key bulb attributes

Importance of Bulb Wattage increases with age.

Those who reside on an acreage are more likely than urban dwellers to rate bulb wattage important (69.5% vs. 61.4% who rated a 6 or 7)

Bulb Wattage

Importance of Bulb Type increases with age.

Respondents with children are more likely to consider bulb type an important attribute than those without children (55.3% vs. 43.5%)

Those of aboriginal ancestry are more likely to rate bulb type either 1 or 2 on the seven point scale than are those of non-aboriginal ancestry (20.6% versus 9.7%)

Bulb Type is rated either a 6 or 7 most often by heavy users of CFL bulbs (74.8%), followed by medium users (62.3%) and light users (49.0%).

Bulb Type (incandescent, CFL…)

Those more likely to provide low importance ratings (1 or 2) for cost of operating include:

-Those who rent (17.7% versus 8.3% of those who own a home)

-Those who live in a duplex, townhouse, or apartment (16.0% versus 8.4% of those who live in a house or condominium)

Energy/Power Cost of Operating Bulb

The importance of purchase price when buying light bulbs decreases as income level increases. Almost six in ten respondents who earn less than $30,000 in household income rate price either a 6 or 7 on a seven point scale (54.7%) while only three in ten people who earn $120,000 or more per year rate it the same (30.9%).

Respondents with children under 18 in the household rate purchase price either a six or seven more often than respondents with no children (51.4% vs. 43.1%).

Purchase Price

light bulb attributes importance tends to increase with age
Light bulb attributes: Importance tends to increase with age

Proportion who rated a 6 or 7

Generally, difference greater than 10 percentage points can be considered statistically significant.

Q5: When shopping for light bulbs, how important are each of the following?

Base: All Respondents (n=1,000)

primary retail outlet used to purchase light bulbs
Primary retail outlet used to purchase light bulbs

Younger residents (ages 18 to 34 and 35 to 54) are more likely to purchase their light bulbs at a big box retailer (55.6% and 49.0%) compared to their older counterparts (36.4%).

Older respondents (ages 55+) are more likely to patronize a hardware store for light bulbs (43.6% vs ~30% among the younger generations)

Q6: Where do you buy the majority of your light bulbs?

Base: All Respondents (n=1,000)

reason for purchasing light bulbs at specific retailer
Reason for purchasing light bulbs at specific retailer

Men are more likely than women to shop at a particular store because of selection (19.5% versus 11.5%), the store has the bulb they need (24.3% versus 15.9%) and the store has a wide selection of bulbs (29.0% versus 17.6%)

Q7: Why do you buy the majority of your light bulbs at this type of store?

Base: All respondents (n=1,000)

slide40

Reasons for shopping for light bulbs at specific store, by retailer type

Q7: Why do you buy the majority of your light bulbs at this type of store?

importance of lamp fixture attributes
Importance of lamp / fixture attributes

Rated a 2

"Not at All Important"

"Very Important"

Rated a 6

Purchase Price of Lamp/Fixture

Bulb Type the Lamp/Fixture Comes with or Can Accept (incandescent, CFL, halogen, ect.)

Maximum Bulb Wattage

Brand of Lamp

Q9: When shopping for table lamps, light fixtures or floor standing lamps, how important are each of the following?

Base: All Respondents (n=1,000)

slide42

Engagement of a sales representative & discussion of energy efficiency

Spoke to Sales Person during most recent light bulb purchase

Those ages 55+ are more likely to have spoken with a sales representative (11.6%) than are their younger counterparts (5.0% among those aged 18 to 34)

Q10: Did the sales person mention energy efficiency to you?

Base: Those who spoke to a sales rep (n=80)

Q11: Did you ask the sales person about energy efficiency?

Base: Those who spoke to a sales rep (n=80)

Q9: The last time you went shopping for light bulbs, did you speak with a sales person?

Base: All Respondents (n=999)

slide44

Awareness of CFLs and incidence of purchasing

Q12: Before participating in this research, have you heard of compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFL’s)?

Base: All Respondents (n=1,000)

Q13: In the past two years have you ever purchased any CFL light bulbs?

Base: Respondents who have heard of CFL light bulbs (n=962)

types of cfl bulbs purchased
Types of CFL bulbs purchased

Younger respondents (ages 18 to 34) are more likely to purchase dimmable CFLs than their older counterparts (ages 55+): 9.4% vs. 3.5%

Q14: What types of CFL’s have you purchased within the last two years? (select all that apply)

Base: Respondents who have bought CFL’s in the last 2 years (n=769)

slide46
Cool Light (or white coloured) CFL bulbs are the most mentioned colour of CFL bulbs respondents have purchased in the last two years

Q15: What colours of CFL’s have you purchased within the past two years? (select all that apply)

Base: Respondents who have bought CFL’s in the last 2 years (n=769)

reasons for buying cfls
Reasons for buying CFLs

Women are more likely than men to mention environmental reasons as their motivator when first purchasing CFL bulbs (47.3% vs. 40.0%)

Those ages 18-34 are more likely than their older counterparts to indicate bulbs last longer (72.3% vs. 49.4% of 34-55 and 40.4% of those 55+) and because I got a deal/on sale (17.4% vs. 8.5% of 35-55 and 5.2% of those 55+) as their primary motivator when first buying CFL bulbs for the first time

Respondents ages 18-34 are more likely than older demographic groups to indicate environmental benefits as a reason to continue to buy CFL bulbs (50.2% vs. 35.6% of those 35-54 and 28.9% of those ages 55+)

Because I got a deal/on sale is more often noted by both those ages 18-34 (8.4%) and 35-54 (7.7%) than by those 55 and older (2.8%) as to why they continue to purchase CFLs

Q16: What prompted you to buy CFL Bulbs in the first place

Base: Respondents who have bought CFL’s in the last 2 years (n=769)

Q17: Are there any other reasons why you continue to purchase CFL bulbs?

Base: Respondents who have bought CFL’s in the last 2 years (n=769)

slide48

Incidence of purchasing EnergyStar® CFL’s

Older aged CFL users (55+) are more likely than their younger counterparts to say that they don’t know whether the CFL bulbs purchased are Energy Star qualified (57.1% versus 42.1% of 18-34 year olds and 38.0% of those ages 35-54)

Q18: Were any of the CFL’s you purchased EnergyStar® qualified?

Base: Respondents who have bought CFL’s in the last 2 years (n=769)

satisfaction with cfl bulbs
Satisfaction with CFL bulbs

Rated a 2

"Not at All Satisfied"

"Very Satisfied"

Rated a 6

Overall Satisfaction

Bulb Life

Reliability and Durability of Bulb

Colour of Light

Energy Savings

Brightness

Q19: How satisfied are you with the CLF’s purchased in the following areas? Please use a scale from 1 to 7, where “1” is not at all satisfied and “7” is very satisfied.

Base: Respondents who have bought CFL’s in the last 2 years (n=769)

slide50

Demographic differences between satisfaction attributes

Females (61.2%) tend to be more satisfied than males (51.0%).

Those with high school or less education are more likely to be satisfied (63.9%) than are those with a university degree (48.8%).

Overall Satisfaction

Older respondents (aged 55+) tend to be more satisfied than their younger counterparts (those aged 18-34 and 35 to 54): 57.7%, 40.8%, 42.5% respectively.

Less affluent respondents (household income of less than $30,000) tend to be more satisfied than those households earning over $90,000 per year (62.2% vs ~30.5%)

Colour of light

Brightness

Females (49.3%) tend to be more satisfied than males (35.4%).

Females (67.0%) tend to be more satisfied than males (52.6%).

Older respondents (aged 55+) tend to be more satisfied than their younger counterparts (those aged 18-34): 67.2% and 54.3% respectively.

Satisfaction tends to decline with household income

Reliability / durability

Females (67.2%) tend to be more satisfied than males (54.7%).

Those living in duplexes, apartments or townhouses tend to be more satisfied (77.5%) than those living houses or condominiums (59.4%)

Bulb life

Younger respondents tend to be less satisfied (35.8%) than their older counterparts (47.6% among 35-54 year olds and 49.5% among those aged 55+)

Less affluent respondents (household income of less than $30,000) tend to be more satisfied than those households earning over $120,000 per year (54.1% vs 26.4%)

Energy Savings

likelihood of purchasing cfl bulbs in the future
Likelihood of purchasing CFL bulbs in the future

88.8%

People aged 55+ are more likely to say not at all likely than are younger segments of the population (5.2% vs. 1.8% among 35 to 54 or 2.0% among 18 to 34)

A greater percentage of those who have completed university are more likely to purchase CFL bulbs in the future (94.8%) than are those with high school or less education (84.9%)

Respondents in the Saskatoon are more likely to purchase CFL bulbs in the future (93.7%) than are those in Regina (82.7%).

Those with children under 18 in the household are more likely than those without children to say they are somewhat or very likely to buy CFL bulbs again (92.3% versus 87.5%)

Q20: How likely are you to buy CFL’s in the future?

Base:Respondents who have bought CFL’s in the last 2 years (n=769)

reasons for not purchasing cfls in the future
Reasons for NOT purchasing CFLs in the future

Q21: Why are you not likely to purchase CFL’s in the future?

Base: Respondents who are not very or not at all likely to purchase CFLs (n=94)

summary
Summary
  • Overall, residents have an average of 37.55 light bulbs in their homes and another 6.94 outside their home (a total of 44.49 bulbs overall).
  • Three out of four homes (75.3%) have at least one CFL bulb in their home
  • Further, nearly one quarter (24%) of all the light bulbs in people’s home are in fact CFLs. However, incandescent bulbs continue to dominate Saskatchewan households (59% of all bulbs inside houses).
summary cont d
Summary (cont’d)
  • As anticipated, the room in which lights are left on the most is the kitchen / kitchen eating area (average of 5.3 hours / day)
  • The living room (3.5 hours / day) and den / study / family room (3.1 hours / day) are the next key areas drawing electricity in the form of light bulbs.
  • Rooms in which there is a comparatively high proportion of incandescent bulbs (and a higher number of bulbs in that room to begin with) include the bedrooms (68% incandescent), living room (62% incandescent) and hallways, stairs and entrance ways (64% incandescent). The first two areas are among the rooms in which lights are also on most often (living room and bed rooms).
    • These findings suggest targeted campaigns could be developed to encourage residents to phase out incandescent bulbs in these rooms.
    • This is especially effective in halls, stairs and entrance ways where people tend to simply “travel through” these areas as opposed to spend time there.
  • All areas of home exteriors have a high incidence of incandescent bulbs. Targeted campaigns could focus on converting bulb in fixtures attached to the home and within garages.
summary cont d56
Summary (cont’d)
  • Areas with lower penetration of CFL bulbs include:
    • Bathrooms (perhaps due to lighting preferences)
    • Dining rooms (perhaps due to existing fixtures)
    • Laundry and utility rooms (higher incidence of fluorescent tubes)
    • Basements (higher incidence of fluorescent tubes)
    • Storage areas (likely due to minimal use)
  • These findings indicate that targeted campaigns can also be used to suggest areas where residents can replace their incandescent bulbs with CFLs.
summary cont d57
Summary (cont’d)
  • Key attributes when purchasing light bulbs include: bulb wattage (63% consider “important”), bulb type (64%), energy efficiency (52%), and purchase price (46%). Light colour (34%), bulb appearance (12%) and brand of bulb (9%) are far less important to consumers.
  • Virtually all light bulbs are purchased at big box retailers (46%), hardware stores (36%) and grocery stores (15%) – a total of 97%.
  • Convenience (56%) and price (42%) are the primary cause for buying bulbs at these locations.
    • This points out that although consumers name price as less important than other factors, it is in fact paramount to purchase decisions for many shoppers.
  • A large majority of consumers (92%) did not engage with a sales representative when purchasing their most recent bulbs, suggesting that shoppers are really left to their own discretions when shopping for these items. This stresses the importance of point of purchase information in addition to supplemental information from various sources (such as SaskPower) convening the benefits of CFL bulbs over incandescent bulbs.
summary cont d58
Summary (cont’d)
  • Overall satisfaction with CFL bulbs is generally high (56% rated their satisfaction a 6 or 7 out of 7).
  • Areas of greatest satisfaction include bulb life (61%) and reliability / durability (60%).
  • Satisfaction is slightly lower for light colour (47%), perceived energy savings (45%) and brightness (42%).
    • Weaker satisfaction with energy savings may be due to the fact that it is difficult to measure real savings, given that the price and consumption of electricity varies throughout the year (and generally go unnoticed by consumers – what is focused on the most is the bottom line of the bill).
  • Perhaps most telling however, nearly nine in ten (89%) are very or somewhat likely to purchase CFL bulbs again in the future.
implications
Implications
  • Overall the results illustrate that the penetration of CLF bulbs in Saskatchewan households is strong:
    • An impressive 75.3% of households have at least one CFL bulb in their home
    • Further, results show nearly one quarter (24%) of all the light bulbs in people’s home are in fact CFLs.
    • Nearly nine in ten (89%) of those who have purchased a CFL bulb, are very or somewhat likely to purchase more in the future
  • These findings suggest the penetration of CFL bulbs is progressing and Saskatchewan residents have high intentions of phasing out their incandescent bulbs.
  • Through ongoing tracking, the true migration rate can be measured.